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  A+ certification - a deception or a need? 
 
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Patrick Eberhart Feb 19, 2004, 12:08am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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For those of us who learned how to add and subtract in binary back in the early 60's and have built more systems than we care to remember it comes as quite a shock to have some young punk shove an A+ certificate in our face and declare their superiority over us. Truth is that A+ certification is lagging in several ways.

At one time teachers were not required to be certified. If you had practical experience then that was quite enough. Many trade schools used local tradesmen who could rebuild and engine for example to provide "know how" to its students.

Today, however, teachers are not only required to be certified in their ability to teach but also in the subject matter they are teaching. Not only must they be certified initially but they must be re-certified periodically. This has become especially true for mechanics since cars have had emission devices installed that relied upon sophisticated sensors and which have required a computer to act like a brain. Even a common driver license has an expiration date and most of us who drive get plenty of practical experience each and every day.

While the time periods for re-certification may differ to accommodate changes in subject matter and methods of teaching the fact of re-certification for teachers is one that is here to stay. This is no true for A+ certification. A+ certification ignores the fact that changes occur in computer technology each and every day. Ironically the companies that are making a bundled on A+ training and certification could be making even more money if they attached an expiration date.

But how long should the interval be? Miller's law suggests that a regular time interval is possible. Has anything occurred in the past eighteen months that you could not learn in one night and take a test on the next day? How about three months? Whatever the time interval A+ certification likewise ignores the value of a troubleshooting chart. The reason is simple: if A+ certification was based upon the tech's ability to use a troubleshooting chart then the correct subject for A+ certification would be the troubleshooting chart rather than the tech. Once troubleshooting charts are certified then the next logical step would be to certify computer to run them and before long techs would not need to be certified at all.







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Rory Witham Feb 19, 2004, 12:34am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: A certification - a deception or a need?
Indeed, the fact do also tell that teacher are certificated as teacher not in the given subject. most teacher are quaified in the subject how ever there qualification will be from a older generation. thus teaching an old subject surpassed by the modern world of technology.

did you read my off topic about qualifications?


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