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James Chong Jan 09, 2008, 01:16pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
This is a quick correction to what I just posted. For the HDD that came with my Vaio, I have removed the Raid 0 configuration to gain more room.

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James Chong Jan 09, 2008, 01:24pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply

Scott Murphy Jan 10, 2008, 01:29am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
as for the reset button thing my Sony didn't ha reset button but the mobo had the conections for it, so when the new case came along with reset button i just hooked it to the jummpers labeled "reset" next to the jumpers labeled "pwr

James Chong Jan 12, 2008, 09:21pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Further to my post several days ago, I went ahead and bought the PC Power and Cooling PSU with 750 watts (I know it is an overkill) and Sapphire 2600XT, hoping I can replace the two in my Sony Vaio with these. The main purpose is to make use of the HDMI feature of the 2600XT to connect my Vaio to my Sony 60" TV home theater.

Has anyone tried to replace the X300 VGC in the Vaio RB54G? The PC Power and Cooling PSU has all the connectors for all the drives and mobo in the Vaio and I could not detect any unusual connections that might pose a problem due to proprietary issue in switching the PSU and VGC. Any comment or suggestion would be greatly appreciated.

James

Scott Murphy Jan 13, 2008, 01:00pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Is the power supply the same dimensions. I know mine was an odd size and shape which resulted in the purchase of a new case.

Geoff Layton Feb 29, 2008, 05:35pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 29, 2008, 05:47pm EST

 
>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Hi guys

Sorry to push in
I've got a sick Vaio PCV-1146.
It froze as I unplugged an external harddrive, without disconecting first ..... I know, I know. When powered up the fans run and the optical drives twitch and the green LED on the MOBO is on, but that's it. I've been round the power supply leads with a test meter and they all look OK except there's a little 3 pin plug with Black, Blue and White. There's -12v on the blue but nothing on the white, I would expect -5v or is it fan control or something. Any ideas

Thanks

James Chong Mar 01, 2008, 09:18pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply

James Chong Mar 01, 2008, 10:05pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Hi Scott,

This is an update to what I finally did in regards to changing the power supply of my Sony Vaio VGC-RB54G. The PC 750 watt power supply unit turned out to be too deep. I went back to the computer store exchanged it with an Emerax 530 watt power supply unit. I also exchanged the ATI 2600 Pro XT video graphic card with the Sapphire HD3850 512 MB, a more powerful video graphic card. The Emerax 530 watt power supply unit is near-identiical in dimensions to what was originally installed in my Vaio RB54G, thus fitting perfectly. The installation of the Sapphire video graphic card was straight forward, except that I had to remove the modem card from the PCI slot. This would give more air flow to the fan on the Sapphire video card.

I have experienced no propriety issues with installing the non-Sony power supply and video card. It has been over a month since I installed the power supply and video graphic card, and my computer is working OK.

Right after I installed my Sapphire video card, I installed Microsoft Flight Simulator X, and four other flight simulator programs. All of them are working fine. The Sony Vaio RB54G came out in 2005, and is not a powerful computer, so I don't expect lightning speed, but the graphics with the HD3850 video graphic card represented a major improvement to what I had. More importantly, I was able to connect the computer to my Sony 60" LCD rear-projection TV via a 16-foot HDMI cable.

Finally, I would like to thank Scott for your comments and help.

James

Richard Hard May 14, 2008, 12:16am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: May 14, 2008, 12:27am EDT

 
>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Upgrading a Sony VAIO destop computer power supply is almost impossible. The Sony power supplies are proprietary and made to fit the available space. Standard ATX or micro ATX power supply boxes are larger and won't fit the existing space. There is simply not enough space if the DVD and CD-ROM drives remain in place.

You can mod the case by moving the power supply outside the case or moving the two optical drives outside the main case into a custom case, but that is a lot of work.

Sony does not like to offer technical advice for "modding" or upgrades, even if the computer is no longer in warranty. A typical ATX power supply can usually be priced from $15 to $90 (depending on features and wattage), but Sony power supplies are three times that price or more.

Modding and upgrading is a standard or typical thing these days and Sony is alienating it consumer base. I've owned (and still own) several refurbished Sony VAIO desktop computers, but I will probably go another route in the future.

I haven't tried the Emerax 530W power supply yet. I am anxious to see if it will work on my RZ46G.

Richard Hard May 14, 2008, 12:26am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
They do use a proprietary PSU. They are made to fit their VAIO case and are two to four times more expensive.

Another post said that the Emerax 530W power supply fit the case almost identically to the Sony PSU.

Richard Hard May 14, 2008, 12:57am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Where did you buy the "Emerax 530W" power supply? What is the exact model number? The website http://www.emeraxusa.com does not have a 530W PSU listed. They have a 525W, but it appears to be a standard ATX sized power supply. If it is a standard ATX, then it will not work in my Sony VAIO destop computer case.

Please help with the information about the PSU that worked for you and where you got it.

Richard Hard May 15, 2008, 02:47am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
You're wrong on this issue. Sony power supplies are proprietary and does not use standard ATX or other third party power supplies. They won't fit for one and then there is the issue of that three pin cable near the twenty pin main motherboard connector.

Richard Hard May 15, 2008, 03:01am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Yeah, that three prong cable bypasses the BIOS after start-up so that you don't have to manually press the F3 (or is it F2) key on the keyboard.

john albrich May 15, 2008, 06:36am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: May 15, 2008, 06:11pm EDT

 
>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Geoff Layton said:
...Any ideas...

If you find you need to replace the PSU,

You might try seeing if you can cross-reference using the UL database,
http://database.ul.com/cgi-bin/XYV/template/LISEXT/1FRAME/index.htm

and then searching for the "equivalent" PSU here
http://www.circotech.com/power-supply-emachine-power-supply.html

You may or may not find a match, and you should verify all details.
Especially important is to verify the physical attributes of the PSU...such as location of the mounting screws, the fan outlet relative to the mains power input side, and the cable output side relative to the interior of the case. For example, when some PSUs are mounted in the case, the cables may extend from the bottom of the PSU, or from the end closest to the front-panel of the PC. Cable orientation can cause real problems with mounting and installation of internal devices...especially classically upper-bay devices like CD/DVD drives.



Given your problem description, it's also possible a different issue is involved.

Have you tried unplugging your PSU from the wall, waiting at least 5 minutes, then removing ALL* un-necessary devices needed to get throught POST, then resetting your motherboard CMOS, then trying power-on again?

By the way, this can require multiple attempts at resetting CMOS. I've had to do this over 3 times in a row to get the computer to finally respond...unplugging from the wall between each CMOS reset and power-on attempt.

You must unplug from the wall (or in some other way remove mains power from the PSU). Just using the front-panel "power" switch won't work.



*ALL means the only things you have left are the PSU, mobo, ONE stick of RAM, display, and video card (only if required to connect your display...use integrated video instead if possible.**) You do NOT have anything else connected internally or externally including the keyboard and mouse.

**Keep in mind that a bad/mis-seated video card can cause a power-on failure including a failure where the PC won't display anything, and can cause the computer (or a PCI-based diagnostic card) to not post any error codes or beeps.


edit to add-
Remember to follow proper ESD procedures at all times. ESD can cause permanent damage to computer components.
edit to add-
bad/mis-seated video card info
edit to add-
comment on importance of verifying physical attributes of the PSU relative to mounting

Richard Hard May 15, 2008, 11:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
After much searching I think I've finally found the solution. No replacement of existing power supply or new computer case is needed. Simply use a supplemental power supply.

For about $50 you can add a [b]"Ultra Power Partner 5.25" Bay 325-Watt ATX Power Supply, Item Number ULT40063" [/b]to an existing 5.25" bay in your computer case and it will provide all the power needs of that new high end graphics card.

Here's a tech article on this subject (easy read) and it describes our predictament to a tee.
http://compreviews.about.com/od/cases/a/SupplementalPSU.htm

Tiger Direct sells this for $50 (or Circuit City, Amazon.com, etc.) http://www.ask.com/bar?q=Power+Partner+Power+Supply&page=1...%3D2700091. Go here for full product specs and pictures.

James Chong May 26, 2008, 03:51pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Hello all,

Sorry I have been away for a while and did not look up the discussions/questions posted by several of you.

I posted here on May 1, 2008, that I was able to change the power supply to my Sony Vaio RB54G without any problem. I ready that again and found a small typo. The Enermax power supply that I installed was 535W, and not 530W as originally stated. On the box, it also has the label "FMA II". It is SWLI and PCI Express ready. The PCI Express "ready" means that there are connectors for connecting to the newer PCI express x 16 video cards. My Enermax power supply has two fans instead of one in the original Sony power supply in my Vaio. In the 535W Enermax, there is an external control of the fan in the power supply, so the fan speed can be adjusted manually. I bought the Enermax PSU from a local store specialized in computer products and accessories (similar to Micro-Center in the US). I got it on sale for $94 Canadian (listed at $140) early this year.

As I indicated in my posting on May 1, I had absolutely no problem in installing the Enermax power supply. This PSU is slightly longer than the one from Sony but there is enough room. The locations of the four holes on the Sony computer case hwere the the power supply is to be attached are identical to the locations of the holes of the Emerax. I have also looked closely into other brands of power supplies, including the 750W Antec that I bought first. The locations of the four screw holes are also identical to those on the Sony case. This led me to believe that Sony was using the industrial standard at least in the case with my VGC RB54G. Thus, installing the Enermax was a snap, just mounting the unit with the four screws. The other cables from the power supply to the SATA drives and DVD writer and ROM drive are straight forward too, as the cables/connectors were color coded.

Further to installing the Enermax, I also installed a new video card Sapphire HD3850. This was also straight forward. The new video card has greatly improved the graphics. However, I still find it slow when I played Microsoft FSX. So, last week when I was in Detroit, I bought a more powerful video (ATI HD3870 512 MB) to replace the HD3850. I am about to install this new card. According to the specs for the HD3870, it should make another major leap. The two video cards alone have set me back for approximately $600. This is obviously not the most economical way to upgrade my Vaio, as $600 can almost pay for a new computer. My justification is that I would learn something in the process.

So, I hope I have answered some of your queries. For those of you still having problems with your computers, it is possible that there are proprietory issues with these particular models of Sony.

James

Tyler Durden Jun 04, 2008, 02:50pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
OK. This post is long, but you guys seem to really be the ones to ask about this...
Here's a thought...
I've been contemplating what to do with my Sony PCV-RZ54G for a while now.
I did get a better video card...the 6800 gsx (AGP bus).
I then got a bigger power supply, a 410w ATX that I took out of an old Dell. Basically, it was free, and Dell is notorious for making good PSU's. I had to modify the back of my case with a dremel tool to fit the PSU, and it's not really mounted tightly. I really don't care about this though, since it sits back out of sight anyways.
Now, here's my thought. I want to upgrade the mobo. Hopefully to one that supports overclocking, 4GB of RAM, and is ATX form factor, NOT microATX, because I want to put this stuff in a new case as well to solve the extreme overheating issue. Also, when I get some more dough, I'm just going to use the new ATX case for a whole new pc later down the road.
I know, everyone is saying I might as well just buy a mobo cpu combo or bare bones kit for a few bills and be light years ahead of the P4 3.2, and 512MB AGP card.
But this is really just for kicks, and the thrill of building and modding a pc.
Now the problems I may encounter are this:
1. I will need a mobo that supports the tuner card and card reader that comes with the pc.
2. I would like to stick with the AGP bus so I don't have to buy a new video card.
3. I would like to stick with DDR400 PC3200 RAM so I don't have to buy new RAM.
4. My current mobo that came with the pc is this: Asus P4SD-VL. Does anyone know if there is anything special about this mobo that makes the Sony hardware work only with it?? Also, what is the form factor for this mobo? I think it's micro ATX, but I'm not positive.

Also, The RZ54G has AV, coax cable, and S-Video, and i-Link ports in the front of the case. Does anyone know if these are somehow proprietary to this mobo? Would I be able to connect them to a different one?
Overall, the PCV RZ54G is a very strange model, because it was made for Windows Media Center Edition. There are some strange connectors inside for the tuner cards input and outputs that I don't know if I will be able to connect to a diff mobo.
Any ideas for a diff mobo? Any thoughts and help is greatly appreciated.



David Dowling Jun 12, 2008, 07:11pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
So, all I can say is that I changed my vid cards around and lost some compatability with some software. If you are not too worried about that then I would guess you don't need to worry about the extra video inputs, etc. They should not be propriatary as far as what they are, just make sure the mobo has spots for any of the original pieces that you may still want. Ie, if you use a DV cam you may want to make sure the mobo has that i400 spot somewhere extra other than the main panel. Everything should be standard, however like I said the Giga software wouldn't work with my coaxial input anymore.

James Chong Jun 18, 2008, 10:57pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply

James Chong Jun 18, 2008, 11:49pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Vaio desktop power supply
Hi Tyler and David,

My Sony VGC RBG desktop first came out in 2005, thus already several years old. I don't know if it is older than your Sony PCV-RZ54G desktop or not. My Sony is also loaded with Windows XP Media Center and with a TV tuner card + Gigapocket. The mobo is made by Intel. I have changed the original power supply to one (Emerax) with 535w. I have also changed the original video card (ATI X300) first to an Sapphire HD3850 512 MB, then last month to a bigger card, Visiontek HD3870 512 MB. Both require PCIe x16 slot. The HD3870 is huge. I had to remove two cards (TV tuner and modem) so the new card would have enough air circulation for the onboard fan. I don't use the modem and find no reason to use the TV tuner either, since I have HD personal video recorder/receiver for satellite boardcast.

With the Visiontek HD3870, I could now connect my computer to my 60" Sony TV via HDMI for media and for my flight simulation games. So far, I have not found incompatibility with any of my installed software (Microsoft Office Professional, WordPerfect, CorelDrtaw, media programs, etc. etc.). Most importantly, I have not encountered any proprietary issues as experienced by other Sony desktop owners.

My RB54G is a mid-tower desktop. It has a mobo with an ATX form factor (12" x 9.6"). Only a mini-desktop would have a mobo with a micro ATX form factor. I have already maxed out my RB54G with 2 GB ram. That's the limitation of the mobo in this model. Also, the processor is dated (2005).

For the above reasons, I would not do any more upgrades to the RB54G. My next computer would either be a complete package from HP or Dell, or from my assembly of individual components starting with a full tower and a new mobo. A full tower would have enough space for cooling, particularly when multiple high power video cards and fast processor are being used for speed and extreme graphics. I would only keep my current Sony for more mundane business, like emailing or internet surfing.

James



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