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  How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1? 
 
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S. Johns Mar 03, 2009, 01:01pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
Found on the WEB (where else?)
Do you know the BIOS Mfg? This may help ;-)
Using a Backdoor BIOS Password

Some BIOS manufacturers implement a backdoor password. The backdoor password is a BIOS password that works, no matter what the user sets the BIOS password to. These passwords are typically used for testing and maintenance. Manufacturers typically change the backdoor BIOS passwords from time to time.
AMI Backdoor BIOS Passwords

AMI backdoor BIOS passwords include A.M.I., AAAMMMIII, AMI?SW , AMI_SW, BIOS, CONDO, HEWITT RAND, LKWPETER, MI, and PASSWORD.

Award Backdoor BIOS Passwords eight spaces(!)- Other reported Award backdoor BIOS passwords include 01322222, 589589, 589721, 595595, 598598 , ALFAROME, ALLY, ALLy, aLLY, aLLy, aPAf, award, AWARD PW, AWARD SW, AWARD?SW, AWARD_PW, AWARD_SW, AWKWARD, awkward, BIOSTAR, CONCAT, CONDO, Condo, condo, d8on, djonet, HLT, J256, J262, j262, j322, j332, J64, KDD, LKWPETER, Lkwpeter, PINT, pint, SER, SKY_FOX, SYXZ, syxz, TTPTHA, ZAAAADA, ZAAADA, ZBAAACA, and ZJAAADC.

Phoenix Backdoor BIOS Passwords: BIOS, CMOS, phoenix, and PHOENIX.

Backdoor BIOS Passwords from Other Manufacturers

Reported BIOS backdoor passwords for other manufacturers include:

Manufacturer BIOS Password
VOBIS & IBM merlin
Dell Dell
Biostar Biostar
Compaq Compaq
Enox xo11nE
Epox central
Freetech Posterie
IWill iwill
Jetway spooml
Packard Bell bell9
QDI QDI
Siemens SKY_FOX
SOYO SY_MB
TMC BIGO
Toshiba Toshiba

Remember that what you see listed may not be the actual backdoor BIOS password, this BIOS password may simply have the same checksum as the real backdoor BIOS password. For Award BIOS, this checksum is stored at F000:EC60.

Some I used back in 1999-2005 - farmerbrown, farmerjoe ;-)

Good Luck!

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S. Johns Mar 03, 2009, 01:14pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
Some Toshiba's can be convinced to bypass the startup BIOS password if you hold down the <LEFT-SHIFT> key while booting the system.
How LAME is that?? ;-)

S. Johns Mar 03, 2009, 01:22pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
Some Toshiba-related stuff I found on a Malaysian site:
Toshiba Bios Password Deletion

Satellite P100 & Satellite Pro P100

With notebook turned off;

* Open Wi-Fi Cover
* Remove Mini Card Wi-Fi card
* Locate & Short Out JP8 for 5 Seconds
* Remove short and turn on
* NO BOOT
* Press & Hold Power button to turn off
* Turn on again & password is cleared

Satellite L10, L20, L30 & Satellite Pro L20

With notebook turned off;

* Open Wi-Fi Cover
* Locate & Short Out JP1 for 15 Seconds (Satellite L10)
* Satellite L20/Pro L20 short out G1

Satellite M100 & Tecra A6

With notebook turned off;

* Open Memory Cover
* Remove Memory
* Remove Black plastic insulation
* Locate & Short CMOS CLR1 for 15 Seconds

NOTE:
All the following models use the same password removal process.

Satellite: 17xx Series, 1000, 1110,1130, 1200, 1900, 2430, 3000 P20,P30, P33, A30, A70, A80, M40X, M50,M60, M70, M100

Tecra A3/S2, A5, A6

* The jumper is always located under or near the memory modules
* Depending on the model the jumper could be labelled J1, J2, J5, J7, J9 or CMOS CLR1 (M100 & A6)

Satellite A100 & Tecra A7

1. Remove Strip cover
2. Remove 2 x K/B screws
3. Move K/B Unit up but donít disconnect
4. Release & Remove Mini Card Wi-Fi Card
5. Locate & short C88 Pin 1 & 2 together
6. Power on Machine while still shorting Pin 1 & 2
7. As soon as the TOSHIBA logo appears, remove short
8. If machine boots, Password has been removed

Satellite A100 (PSAA2A-02C01N)

1. Remove Memory Cover from base of machine
2. Release & remove right side Memory Module
3. Lift black plastic insulation
4. Locate & short PAD500 Pin 1 & 2 together
5. Power on machine while still shorting Pin 1 & 2
6. As soon as the TOSHIBA logo appears, remove short
7. If machine boots, password has been removed

TECRA A4 & Satellite M40

1. Open modem & Wi-Fi card cover
2. Remove mini PCI Wi-Fi card
3. Lift up black plastic
4. Locate & short C738 Pin 1 & 2 together
5. Power on machine while still shorting Pin 1 & 2
6. As soon as the TOSHIBA logo appears, remove short
7. If machine boots, password has been removed

TECRA S1

1. Open palm rest cover
2. Remove mini PCI Wi-Fi card
3. Lift up black plastic
4. Locate & short C5071 Pin 1 & 2 together
5. Power on machine while still shorting Pin 1 & 2
6. As soon as the TOSHIBA logo appears, remove short
7. If machine boots, password has been removed

TE 2300

1. Remove 2 x B12 screws from bottom of system
2. Remove strip cover
3. Remove keyboard screws 1 x B2.5 & 1 x SF4
4. Remove 1 x 4mm screw & Wi-Fi cover
5. Remove mini PCI Wi-Fi card if fitted
6. Locate & short points as shown in picture below
7. Power on machine while still shorting points
8. Short for 5 seconds
9. Nothing will appear on the screen
10. Turn system off holding down power button
11. Password is now removed

TE2300 Motherboard

Satellite A60

1. Open Wi-Fi slot cover
2. Lift up black plastic
3. Locate & short C561 Pin 1 & 2 together
4. Power on machine while still shorting Pin 1 & 2
5. As soon as the TOSHIBA logo appears, remove short
6. If machine still asks... Start over and Repeat as necessary
7. If machine boots, password has been removed

If you need your Toshiba bios password removed and your model is not listed above then chances are itís a procedure that can only be done at an authorised repair centre.

SOURCE: http://www.laptop-repair.info/toshiba_bios_password.html

derek greig Mar 04, 2009, 12:58am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
no M1 there then :(

Awais ghouri Mar 04, 2009, 02:06am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
sorry i have toshiba tecra M9

and i dont have bios password

S. Johns Mar 05, 2009, 12:06am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
But that shouldn't matter. Toshiba engr only have so much intelligence. TRY THEM ALL! ;-)
Did you try shorting pin 2 to 13 on PPort and turning on the power?

R C Jun 19, 2009, 12:35am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jun 19, 2009, 01:00am EDT

 
>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
S. Johns, thank you for this - your instructions for "Satellite M100 & Tecra A6" enabled me to fix my Toshiba Satellite Pro M70-137, model no. PSM76E-00500KEN, without having to spend any money! I believe this is essentially the same machine as the Satellite M70, though with a different graphics card and CPU.

In case anyone else has a similar problem, here's what happened and what I did:

I had reformatted the hard drive and installed Windows 7 RC, and was installing various drivers. I thought I would re-flash the BIOS with the version 5.30-WIN, described as "This Bios is ONLY compatible for Notebooks with Windows Vista!!!" on http://uk.computers.toshiba-europe.com/innovation/download_bio...service=UK . Probably a dumb thing to do but I figured almost everything else for Vista seems to run OK on Windows 7 so perhaps this would (or perhaps I'd break my laptop).

Anyway, I ran the Windows program to flash the BIOS and the machine stopped dead when it said it was flashing block 17 of 19. On reboot everything seemed fine though, and I could not re-flash since the utility kept saying that "The new BIOS image is the same as the current system BIOS, so the BIOS will not be changed." I thought perhaps everything had worked OK despite the premature power-off, so I rebooted the machine and pressed F2 for BIOS setup.

At that point I was prompted for a password. It's a Phoenix BIOS so I tried all the documented Phoenix backdoor passwords but nothing worked. I also tried "Toshiba" in case Toshiba are dumb, but apparently they're not, and a blank password didn't work either. I had never set a BIOS password so this prompt seemed to be a bug caused by the BIOS upgrade, unless Toshiba intentionally lock users out of the BIOS setup these days.

This wasn't a BIOS boot or Supervisor password request it seems - I could get into Windows without entering a password but I just couldn't get into the BIOS configuration with F2.

So, following your instructions I disconnected mains and removed the battery, opened up the RAM compartment, removed both RAM sticks, and peeled off the plastic cover over the circuitboard underneath. The plastic was clear, not black, and it had stickers with various code numbers on them. I did not see anything marked CMOS CLR1, or CMOS anything. The only thing that looked like a candidate for shorting was a little zigzag-shaped thingy on the circuitboard labelled J1. This was up towards the top left as I held the laptop upside down with the battery hole away from me. This J1 didn't look like a normal jumper: it was just two exposed metal ends of tracks on the circuitboard with a small space between them. I held a flat-head screwdriver across it for about 15 seconds a couple of times then reassembled the laptop.

When I rebooted I could get into the BIOS setup with F2 as usual, and the password prompt had gone. Windows 7 works fine too.

This is a 2005-model laptop where you supposedly cannot reset the BIOS or Supervisor password without going to a Toshiba dealer, but in this case I could reset the password for BIOS setup just by shorting J1.I hear that proper passwords are set in an EEPROM on these newer Toshiba laptops and cannot be cleared by shorting a jumper, so perhaps this was just CMOS corruption causing a bug rather than a password becoming set. Still, for anyone who hasn't set a password but is being prompted, shorting this jumper is worth a try.

I am still slightly worried about the BIOS flash stopping at block 17 of 19, but BIOS setup and Windows 7 seem to work fine - Windows 7 feeling more responsive than XP ever did.

derek greig Sep 21, 2009, 05:52pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
laptop/notebook BIOS passwords cannot be reset by shorting the CMOS battery. BIOS passwords in most laptops are stored in a special chip on the motherboard and the only way to bypass this password is to replace this laptop security chip

ka stad Apr 20, 2011, 12:07pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How to remove BIOS password from Toshiba Tecra M1?
I read in the manual that you need to use a docking station connect the printer port and hold down key while the system is starting up. I found this in the service manual. I have the same problem but have not tried this yet. I do not know if a printer with work or if i need the loop back connector.
thanks

-K


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