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  Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable? 
 
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FingerMeElmo87 Aug 30, 2005, 11:49pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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i was thinking about current cooling options out on the market; stardard fans, liquid, and phase change. well one day while looking in the luandry room for something i notice that we had a kenmore mini fridge that no one uses. then it hit me "why not put a computer parts in the fridge?" you can usually get the temps inside to below freezing easily. so why not put a computer into a mini frigde? with adequit cooling and plenty of space theres plenty for expandability. the only problem i thought of is humidity. ice freezing to a mother board doesnt sound so good. tell me some one; is this at all feasable?


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Chris M Aug 31, 2005, 12:07am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
If you can eliminate the problem of condensation, it's perfectly feasible. Consider also the amount of heat you are outputting. Can your fridge handle the load?

--
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G. G. Aug 31, 2005, 12:18am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
dont do it. too much humidity will cause condensation and especially when you open the door just to peak inside. Go open your house refridge just for three seconds and see how fast the edge of the door, shelves, and stuff get condensated. Now just imagine that with your components. It doesnt take very long. It is like as soon as you open the door. How much condensation will always vary depending on the weather and environment ie house, land, etc..... Now I am saying this about all the components in the fridge.... BUT.......... if you were to do a water cooling system for the computer and put the pump, resoviour, and radiator in the fridge.... this would be great. If you want to know more about this type of setup then contact PCGeek because he has one of a dooozzzzieeee working.

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FingerMeElmo87 Aug 31, 2005, 12:24pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
ok well what about a phase change. is it possible to model a phase change cooling system the same way that a liquid cooling setup would be. instead of the cooling liqiud there would be R507 gas and obviously there would be no radiator nor a resorvior. there will just be a compressor with an outlet for the compressed gas/liquid and an inlet for the uncompressed gas to be recompressed. now the pipe with the compressed gas would lead to the valve that releases it but unlike in conventional refrigeration methods there would be two outlet valves instead of one. one would go to the cpu and another would go to the video card (or a second if in SLI. then the valve would be a three port valve) then circle back to the compressor to be recompressed. is it feasable?

COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR
l I
/ \ / I \
CPU GPU or GPU CPU GPU
\ / \ l /
l l
COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR

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FingerMeElmo87 Aug 31, 2005, 12:25pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
ok well what about a phase change. is it possible to model a phase change cooling system the same way that a liquid cooling setup would be. instead of the cooling liqiud there would be R507 gas and obviously there would be no radiator nor a resorvior. there will just be a compressor with an outlet for the compressed gas/liquid and an inlet for the uncompressed gas to be recompressed. now the pipe with the compressed gas would lead to the valve that releases it but unlike in conventional refrigeration methods there would be two outlet valves instead of one. one would go to the cpu and another would go to the video card (or a second if in SLI. then the valve would be a three port valve) then circle back to the compressor to be recompressed. is it feasable?

COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR
l I
/ \ / I \
CPU GPU or GPU CPU GPU
\ / \ l /
l l
COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR

Phenom II 720 BE @ 3.41Ghz w/ Zerotherm Nirvana NV120
G.Skill 2 x 2GB DDR2 1066 @ 5-5-5-15
GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4
VisionTek HD 4850 512MB GDDR3
500GB Seagate 7200.12 - Windows 7 RC1
Hiper Type-R 580 WATT PSU
FingerMeElmo87 Aug 31, 2005, 12:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
ok well what about a phase change. is it possible to model a phase change cooling system the same way that a liquid cooling setup would be. instead of the cooling liqiud there would be R507 gas and obviously there would be no radiator nor a resorvior. there will just be a compressor with an outlet for the compressed gas/liquid and an inlet for the uncompressed gas to be recompressed. now the pipe with the compressed gas would lead to the valve that releases it but unlike in conventional refrigeration methods there would be two outlet valves instead of one. one would go to the cpu and another would go to the video card (or a second if in SLI. then the valve would be a three port valve) then circle back to the compressor to be recompressed. is it feasable?

COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR
l I
/ \ / I \
CPU GPU or GPU CPU GPU
\ / \ l /
l l
COMPRESSOR COMPRESSOR

Phenom II 720 BE @ 3.41Ghz w/ Zerotherm Nirvana NV120
G.Skill 2 x 2GB DDR2 1066 @ 5-5-5-15
GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4
VisionTek HD 4850 512MB GDDR3
500GB Seagate 7200.12 - Windows 7 RC1
Hiper Type-R 580 WATT PSU
Merc Aug 31, 2005, 12:28pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?

Merc
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G. G. Aug 31, 2005, 01:22pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
now i havent seen one that has multiple chill cords from the compressor.

take a look at some of these as a start. -

http://www.asetek.com/
http://www.jab-tech.com/customer/home.php?cat=194


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FingerMeElmo87 Aug 31, 2005, 07:13pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
yeah. i see that having multiple cords leading fom the compressor would be badass ass but then again no one else has anything to offer like that. i guess this would be more along the lines of some serious do it yourself projects. time to take apart my brothers mini fridge.

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Greg M Aug 31, 2005, 07:29pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
I see nothing wrong with putting one in a fridge as long as you keep it in a dry room, seal the opening the cables are coming in from, and dont open it unless the whole computer is room temp. Put your drives outside the fridge for easy access.

Also, find some of that de-humidifier stuff that you get with shoes and other random things and put a small mound of that in, replacing it whenever it becomes saturated.

As far as refidgerated water, you still have the same issues of condensation on the water blocks, and if your system is highly effective, behind the CPU.

Another option would be put the computer in the fridge, submerged in a non-conductive liquid. Then condensation is not an issue.

----
FX-55, 2x 1GB GSkill, X1800XT (512MB), 2x250GB RAID-0, DFI SLI-D
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FingerMeElmo87 Aug 31, 2005, 08:11pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
does anyone know were you can get some R507 gas? and whats this about nonconductive liquid? are you talking about submerging the motherboard and everything else in this liquid?

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GIGABYTE GA-MA790X-UD4
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Tim Sep 12, 2005, 10:06am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Yes. Yes he is.

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Paul Bruce Aug 30, 2008, 12:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
It's definately possible. I don't think it's reasonable for non-enthusiasts or feasable for long-term computing. Until it is:

http://pbruce.blogspot.com/2008/08/computer-refrigerator-or-both.html

Sander Sassen Aug 30, 2008, 04:02pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Feasible? Yes, most certainly, I pioneered the idea almost ten years ago, have a look:

http://www.hardwarecentral.com/hardwarecentral/reports/article..._3580756_1

Cheers,

Sander Sassen
Editor in Chief - Hardware Analysis
ssassen@hardwareanalysis.com
Gerritt Aug 30, 2008, 08:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
DO NOT SUBMERSE your PSU!

Everything else should be fine.
You'll want your liquid to be non-organic, as organic oils will break down and leave residue that can be conductive or capacitive.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
Meats_Of_Evil Aug 30, 2008, 11:46pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Whats wrong with submerging a PSU? I've seen it done using vegetable oil.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Gerritt Sep 01, 2008, 08:12am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Liquids that are non-conductive at low wattage/voltage can become conductive at higher voltages (110-240VAC). Additionally vegitable oil is one of those organics that I mentioned that are a no-no as they will break down and become conductive over time. Vegitable oils can be used in the short term, but almost never survive as a longterm solution. The breakdown from contamination can be slowed through the use of a closed airfree system (such as using a floating airshield such as sheet plastic), it is still more prone to thermal breakdown over time than the non-organic alternatives. Also keep in mind that a low viscosity/high circulation rate will be more efficient than a high viscosity/ low circulation rate in moving heat away from the components.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
herbey zepeda Dec 15, 2009, 08:16pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Dec 15, 2009, 08:21pm EST

 
>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?

TamTheBam Dec 16, 2009, 01:05pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?

I've thought about this many a time - using a refrigeration stylee cooling method COMBINED
with my watercooling. But not the whole coolign system. Only the res/pump or rads.
Enough to maybe get the temps down by another 10 degs possibly.
I aint done it, cos I could never be bothered with all the hassle. But, if I did use a
fridge of some sort, it would be "part" of the loop not involved in the whole loop.
Condensation would not present a problem. If you think it does, the please take time
to re-read what I just posted. :)

....I'm back, but only as a part-timer... :)
<a class= Dec 16, 2009, 01:17pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Dec 16, 2009, 01:19pm EST

 
>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
The only thing fridge requires is to make sure the environment is sealed. So, if a case was completely closed it would work BUT the problem is

1. Running cables out of 100% sealed fridge.
2. Components such as high end cpu/videocards in CF/SLI generate so much heat, you'd need a very powerful freezer.
3. Must have an air intake but has to be dry so no condensate builds up inside the chassis.

We were actually thinking about taking out old Athlon 3200+ pc and getting a 120$ fridge, and just playing around with it. Take the PC case apart leaving only mounting frame, load it into the fridge and go from there.

_______________________________________________________
3930K @ 5.00Ghz | GA-X79-UD3P | 16Gb DDR3 | GTX770 | W7 x64
Gerritt Dec 18, 2009, 09:46pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
OK, so if I understand the latest question:
Could I put my radiator and/or resevoir in a mini-refrigerator/freezer?
I'm thinking it could be done if you have a liquid cooled system already, and you notice a few caveats.
1. All refrigerators/freezers require a great deal of time to come up/down in tempurature.
2. You would have to have the system on and the refrigerator on all of the time or wait for the tempurature stablization.
3. If you were to use a cheap mini-fridge you'd probably have to change the thermostat and/or the compressor to provide for more BTU exchange if you were to actually achieve any great gains.

Having said that:
1. This could be a cheap way of increasing your overclock without having to worry overly about condensation on the actual electronic components.
2. You could start with a $10 fridge off of Craigslist or eBay and drill away, vs. the several hundred $ solutions available.

I'd love to see someone that put the Radiator in the freezer compartment of a mini-fridge, and the Resi in the Fridge proper. You may have to increase the airflow in chassis in order to reduce the possible condensation, but I think this could be a cheap way of pushing the operational temps down and the MHz up.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO

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