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  Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable? 
 
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john albrich Dec 18, 2009, 10:28pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?

I'd get rid of the air-transfer efficiency loss as well. What I'd think you want is the most efficient way to xfer heat from your hardware all the way through to the freezer's external heat radiator. Take off the inside wall of the freezer/frig and thermally couple your hardware to the freezer's internal "heat sink" (usu mounted behind the thin plastic sheet in the back of the freezer).

One might also consider filling any empty space in the freezer with relatively high heat capacity material to provide superior latency when there is a high prolonged heat surge from your hardware. Air has low heat capacity and doesn't "store cold" very well. Even water would help and could be stored in plastic soda bottles (with room for expansion). But it could be anything with decent heat capacity including solid blocks of metal.

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Gerritt Dec 18, 2009, 10:45pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
I like the idea...
But John, have you actually tried it?
Your approach is more efficient than mine, but even at that we may have condensation issues.
Like I said before, I'd love to see someone try this with some older HW before I give it a shot myself.

Good input, none the same!
Love having you back!

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
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herbey zepeda Dec 20, 2009, 09:33am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
The problem with regrigeration is condensation, wouldn't it be better to use an air conditioner, air flows faster than in a refrigearator, condensation will occur if the temperature outside the cooled area is warm enough, but since the cold area is inside, I would thjink condensation will not be very likely in the inside, furthermore, given that the air is flowing inside, this will probably keep the humidity in the inside at lower levels. So maybe we could place the computer box into another larger box. The larger box will have an intake and an exhaust, the intake would be connected to the air conditioner box. Then in thecomputer we could put the appropriate fans, but not remove the case to still acomplish the bernoulli efffect (higher air flow for the individual parts), because the intake of the computer would be taking cold air constantly this would keep the circuitry cool. THis will be like putting the computer in a small cold room.

Jason Morris Feb 23, 2010, 08:02am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Hi Everyone,

Just to let everyone know that I have tested my watercooling Radiator in my Chest Freezer.

I own a Triple Radiator with a Danger Den cpu and gpu waterblock, they are cooling a "Core 2 Extreme QX6800 2.93Ghz Rev B3 1.36-1.4volts" and a "Nvidia GTX280".

Just to let everyone know that my processor runs very hot and requires alot of voltage for overclocking.

I've provided two screen shots of my processor being overclocked to 3.4ghz (Watercooled)
and 3.53ghz (Chest Freezer+Watercooled) see below

Watercooled Results - http://i903.photobucket.com/albums/ac235/jasonsupreme/Waterrad.jpg

Chest Freezer+Watercooled Results - http://i903.photobucket.com/albums/ac235/jasonsupreme/FreezerRad.jpg

I am happy to say that combinding a radiator in a freezer has knocked off a huge 20 DEGREES Celcius!

But I still believe Phase Change cooling does a hell lot better just like the previous ones


Vapochill PE
Vapochill XE (Extreme)
Vapochill LS (Light speed)

how ever the vapochill was far too noisy please check out the NEW Phase Cooling system by Thermal Take it's low in noise and comes with a fantastic case watch the video clip here.

Thermaltake Xpressar RCS-100 - http://xpressar.com/product/rsc100/rsc100-features.html

~Vel Feb 23, 2010, 04:49pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
Er. Wouldn't water cooling in a freezer, erm, freeze?

Jason Morris Feb 23, 2010, 05:29pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Is putting computer parts into a refrigerator feesable?
I haven't left it in over night to know, I've only tested it for 4/5hrs because I'm not the only one who uses that freezer i believe it could freeze but since the lid was slightly open and half of the water is outside of the freezer in a warmer temperature there's a possibility it won't freeze. I'll be ordering a compact freezer of my own so I'll see how it goes leaving it on over night and if it freezes then I'll just have to take it out when the PC is turned off.
as for the 5 hours i tested it for as far as the PC is turned on the lowest temp in the bios was 48c @3.6ghz and the rad was not getting any colder to become frozen.
To be honest i don't think a refrigerator would get the temps down that much more than having it outside of a fridge because these PC components run really hot.


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