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  DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable 
 
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Sam Jones Jan 06, 2006, 09:23pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I am trying to find a good modem/router to bridge a connection with my ISP and my switch. We have DSL (Phone wire) and I need to connect that to a switch with an RJ45. Does anyone have any suggestion of good ones to use, preferable ones with good firewalls and has wireless?
Any Suggestions would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks in advance

Sam


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Max Steiner Jan 06, 2006, 09:58pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
You need a DSL/ADSL modem. In Digital Subscriber Line (DSL), the "internet" travels over 2 of the 4 strands in UTP wire, but it's in a modulation that a switch, computer, or other net device doesn't readily understand. You need an "interpreter" -- a modem. :)

Then, once it's been "translated", the "internet" travels over 4 of the 8 strands in Cat5_ (or Cat5). So, you'll find that on the back of the DSL/ADSL modem, you'll have UTP in (the RJ11 jack) and Cat5/Ethernet out (RJ45).


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Charles Johnson Jan 23, 2006, 11:40am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
I would suggest getting a good cable/DSL router to put between the modem and your computers. If you plan to run 2 or more computers on your network and give each internet access, you'll need a way to give each PC its own IP address. The only way you can do that with a simple switch is if you have extra IPs from your ISP. This costs more money. Once you have your modem installed, connect the RJ45 jack on the modem to the WAN port of the router, then each PC to a LAN port on the router. If you still want to use your switch, connect the "uplink" port on the switch to one of the LAN ports on the router. If your switch doesn't have an "uplink" port then it probably has an auto-sensing function so you can use any port you like to go to another switch or router. Check your switch's operating manual if you aren't sure.
Having a router on your network has several benefits besides letting you connect multiple devices to the internet. In this day and age of hackers and other nefarious types trying to get into your computer, the firewall built into just about every modern DSL router is pretty much a necessity. Most routers also have features that let you filter net access to indvidual PCs on a schedule, or you can block certain websites, good features if you have kids getting online. There are plenty of wireless routers out there now too so if you have or plan to have a laptop you won't have to string Cat5 all over the place in order to move from room to room.
One other thing about DSL modems: I have seen some that have a built-in router and switch, but they were provided by the ISP. Check with your ISP to see if they offer something like that or perhaps they can tell you where to get one if you wish.

Dublin_Gunner Jan 23, 2006, 12:07pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 23, 2006, 12:08pm EST

 
>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
"The only way you can do that with a simple switch is if you have extra IPs from your ISP"

Not true. You can connect the modem / router to one PC, set it up as a server, and share the internet conenction to the other PC's in the network.

Did it in my friends house recently, got the modem connected to a crappy PC under the stairs which is now a server, set up a wireless network to 3 other PC's in the house and shared the connection.

Works like a charm, and only needed 1 IP address from the ISP, so no extra cost ;-)

Ya gotta think outside the box..........

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Charles Johnson Jan 23, 2006, 12:16pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
I got so wrapped up with the previous post I forget your question about a good router. I would say stick with name brands like D-Link, Linksys (part of Cisco), Netgear etc. I have personally used D-Link and Linksys routers. Back in 2001-2002 I used a Linksys BEFSR41 cable/DSL router with a 4-port switch. It frequently locked up so I would have to unplug the power for a minute then plug it back in to make it work. Lucky for me I had borrowed it so I gave it back<g>. For a year or so after that I had dialup so I didn't need a router. In 2003 I got broadband again (RoadRunner) I bought a used D-Link DI704P which had a 4-port switch and printer port built in so I didn't have to have to use resorces on a computer to print something. The router worked flawlessly for over a year until I gave up cable when money got tight. I was trying to diagnose a cable problem for a friend a few months later and found out the modem was bad when it fried my router. When I got DSL I found a D-Link DI604 on eBay which has been working flawlessly for nearly a year now. It has lots of features but isn't expensive. It even has a cable diagnostic feature to tell you if one of your Cat5 cables is bad. After some friends had asked me to look at their laptops with built in wireless I decided to get a wireless router, so when WalMart had a sale on routers I got a Linksys WRT54G for a very good price. After nearly a month I can report not one problem with daily operation. I will say that if you know how to set up basic network settings don't use the included "setup" CD. The Linksys is pretty easy to set up without the CD. I haven't had much chance to test the wireless range yet but when I left the wireless unsecured *somebody* got a connection and used my broadband for a day or 2. I don't know how far away they are, since I live in an apartment complex. I eventually kicked them off and put the security back in place on the wireless side. A coworker who also lives in an apartment has been able to surf with their laptop doing the same thing that person was doing, getting a free ride on somebody else's internet. If you do get a wireless router, be carefull about leaving your wireless unsecured. Somebody could be using your internet connection to do bad or illegal things, not to mention if they are downloading alot they will slow your internet surfing down too.They could also be trying to get into your computer(s) to do any number of things.
Bottom line: do some reasearch, check several sources and see what routers you see consistently get good reviews, shop around at local stores and online. A cheap little-known brand router might work fine, or it might be a POS. Stick with the recognized brands and you should be fine. All the routers I have mentioned are less than $80 brand new in the box with warranty.

Charles Johnson Jan 23, 2006, 12:32pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
Dublin makes a good point, but not many folks have an extra PC they can do that with. I was talking more toward the average computer owner who can't dedicate a whole PC to sharing the net connection, and/or wouldn't know how to set that up to begin with. I've used that method myself, and known somebody who did and it works fine alot of the time but then the computer needs a restart for something, or Windows crashes and there goes your internet connection until it's restarted etc. In my opinion way too much hassle for most internet sharing purposes. Routers are cheap compared to the price of a PC, not to mention a PC uses many times more power than a router and as I just mentioned a router is much much more reliable than a PC for routing/inernet sharing.

Rory Witham Jan 23, 2006, 12:44pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
A modem/router will or should I say can have ports (RJ45) you then bridge this so that it forwards to the switch which then goes to the computers. BUT as you can get 4 ports there is no need for the router.

Good ones start from about £25.00 or you can spend around £75.00 for a modem router with a good firewall and even 145MB/s Wireless connection.
I have one on my site that I use and a few people use from HWA - only one listed :) its wireless and £65.00


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Charles Johnson Jan 23, 2006, 04:13pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
Rory, with the exception of business DSL installations I have seen, the DSL modems I have seen here in the US only convert phone line to a single RJ45 jack and do not have routing capabilities for multiple computers. Most non-business DSL service here uses a dynamic IP so if you want to use more than one PC you need a separate router to translate the single IP into several internal IP addresses. The DSL ISPs are hoping you'll pay extra for either *their* router or for extra IP addresses. Using only a switch between modem and computer(s) leaves each device visible to the ISP and since only one computer at a time can use an IP you won't have much luck with multiple PCs without a router.
If you must use a particular switch, you can get a router with only 1 LAN port, but those are pretty scarce these days. I think Linksys still makes the BEFSR11 which only has a WAN port and a single LAN port but the comparable 4-port BEFSR41 is only $10 US more in price and saves the cost of a switch(unless you need more than 4 ports).
As far as combined modem/routers go, you could probably get one but I wouldn't go that route personally. I prefer picking my own so I can get the features I want, and I control it myself. Even the wireless routers on the market now aren't terribly expensive. I don't know how you get 145mbps wireless, must be some protocol not available here in the US. I bought my Linksys wireless router with 4-port switch for less than $50 US.
Sam, how is it you have DSL but no modem? Does your ISP make you buy your own?

Dr. Peaceful Jan 23, 2006, 06:02pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
If you're looking for an all-in-one ADSL modem + Router + Firewall combo, there aren't much in the market. Here are two examples:
1. Zoom modems, preferably Model 5590 X6 for wireless or Model 5654 X5 with wires. I never use them so I don't know how reliable are they. Here's the link, http://www.zoom.com/products/adsl_overview.html

2. Netgear, Model DG632 wired ADSL modem + Router and Firewall. This one only give ONE RJ45 out port. So you HAVE to use a switch. Here's the link, http://www.netgear.com/products/details/DG632.php
Netgear is good brand, but I never use this particular product.

The advantage of using these combos is you don't have to use separate products (i.e. one router + one modem). Hence, save space and get ease of operation. The disadvantage of these is if you change your ISP from DSL to Cable, then very likely you can't not use these device no more. I don't know if you can still use it as just a router / switch only without the DSL modem, any one know here?

So the safest way is still to add a firewall router onto your ISP's DSL modem.

Charles Johnson Jan 23, 2006, 07:41pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
Good point Harry. DSL modems aren't always compatible with every DSL service out there. If you ever move or just decide to change providers, the DSL modem from one service might not work with the next, so having an all-in-one modem/router/switch could end up being a waste of money. Like Harry said, the safest way is to use the standard modem with your own router. This also allows you to make your own choice about what router is best for you in terms of features, wireless capability, price point etc.

Rory Witham Jan 24, 2006, 02:55am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
OK, So I Must know nothing about it.. or do i??

If you're looking for an all-in-one ADSL modem + Router + Firewall combo, there aren't much in the market. Here are two examples:
1. Zoom modems, preferably Model 5590 X6 for wireless or Model 5654 X5 with wires. I never use them so I don't know how reliable are they. Here's the link, http://www.zoom.com/products/adsl_overview.html

Works on ALL types of networks, a routed modem is effectivly a switch, a device with NAT give a single external IP and VPN to the internal network.
Demands of the users have caused the makers of modem routers to be built with the features that they most need with out haveing to by POS and other hardware to make things work. Manurfactuing costs dictate that is cheap for a company to build a set standard to fulfil the needs of the many that reproducing the smae thing with different settings and abilities ( excluding wired and wireless) You will also find that the differnce between a single and a quad port is just the ports and the hardware remains the same - Like the missing chips on certain motherboards -

Johnson if you having used real technologies and consider your self to be correct, You are or should I say were correct about 4-7 years ago. for the past 4 or so year most - if not all modems support all international setting for PPOE and PPOA connections and the internation modulations and VCI's
Modems with routers, do not require switching and add to the average joe a more complex set up with regards to the bridging and IP asignment needed for computers to work together, Also switches often make for a slower internet speed and are less flexible.



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Lou Bot Jan 24, 2006, 10:51am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
Sam - is the DSL for residentual or business? Does the DSL have static IP's or dynamic? Since I am not sure what you have there is a broad range of routers / modems. I recommend Netopia routers. The phone company installs Netopia routers at my client's offices. One of the nice things about Netopia the DSL modem and the router are built into one unit.You can connect to the router via web-base or an emulation program that supports telnet, also connect through windows command prompt. Check em out


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Charles Johnson Jan 24, 2006, 11:33pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: DSL RJ11 to RJ45 Network Cable
I had forgotten about Netopia. We had 3 of them on our DSL lines at work untill we switched to T-1 almost 3 years ago. They are still sitting in a drawer collecting dust. One is a single port, the other 2 are 4-port. I vaguely remember seeing a Netopia modem/router another time but it was also at a business. Sam, if you can get a Netopia it sounds like just what you are looking for. I don't know anything about Zoom products so I can't recommend either way on them. I never had a part in managing or administering the 3 Netopias we had at work, but in the few months I was around them they worked fine as far as I know.


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