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jake Feb 06, 2006, 03:22am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
gerrite,
when you sample a signal you have a sampling frequency which is twice the frequency you want to sample otherwise you get aliasing.
simply put if you want to sample a 20Khz sine wave then you have to use a sampling frequency of 40Khz, in egineering (not really audio) it is common to over sample a signal to make sure you have extra data.
so yes the sampling frequency does determine the frequencies which are represented.
a 1Hz sampling frequency can easily sample signals from 0.5hz downward and would be useless to sample anything above 0.5Hz

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Adam L Feb 10, 2006, 03:40pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
Good post Jake.

I came across some "audible theshold" graphs. At 20hz for most people an 82db volume level is needed for us to "hear" the sound. At 15hz, it becomes around 90db and keeps rising afterwards. It's similar for the high frequencies.

The advantage of sampling at higher frequencies is both extended bandwidth (from 22.05KHz to 48KHz+ at 96KHz sampling rates), which means some more "airyness" for those folks who have the money for supertweeters that extend to 40KHz, but most importantly moves the "ringing" that results from the brick wall filter which is audible at 22.05KHz. People complain about metal (aluminum usually, sometimes titanium) tweeters that resonate at 22-23KHz. It would be no surprise that they can hear the ringing of a digital filter which is an important reason why sampling rates have increased.

ken Fraleigh Feb 15, 2006, 11:54pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
This issue is addressed in creatives help file. It is not a crossover frequency, It is a cutoff frequency. It is ment to be used to protect smaller speakers from to much low frequency, or just set it to 10 Hz if using a sub/sat system. If you use all three analog outputs (on the x-fi) this setting changes to a crossover frequency slider.

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Daniel du Prie Jan 21, 2010, 01:39am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
The cutoff frequency refers to the frequency at which the signal will be sent to the subwoofer instead of the satellite speakers.

If you have it set at say 80 Hz then all signals below 80 Hz get redirected to the subwoofer. This is to stop the satellites from getting overloaded and clipping when you are using a lot of bass boost.

If you have a x.1 system then where you put the slider depends on your satellites. Basically the higher the frequency the less bass goes through your main system. If you small, tinny satellites you'd probably set it higher. If you have big powerful staellites you'd set it pretty low. I have a Logitech 5.1 Z5500 system and I set it at 80 Hz though I could probably get away with setting it a bit lower.

If you just have a 2.0 (or even 1.0?) system then I'd just set it to the lowest setting - 10Hz - because any bass redirection will get redirected nowhere due to the lack of a subwoofer. I'd then adjust any bass boost til it sounded just right ie making sure there's not so much gain that my speakers clip.

Dublin_Gunner Jan 21, 2010, 07:10am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
Daniel du Prie said:
The cutoff frequency refers to the frequency at which the signal will be sent to the subwoofer instead of the satellite speakers.

If you have it set at say 80 Hz then all signals below 80 Hz get redirected to the subwoofer. This is to stop the satellites from getting overloaded and clipping when you are using a lot of bass boost.

If you have a x.1 system then where you put the slider depends on your satellites. Basically the higher the frequency the less bass goes through your main system. If you small, tinny satellites you'd probably set it higher. If you have big powerful staellites you'd set it pretty low. I have a Logitech 5.1 Z5500 system and I set it at 80 Hz though I could probably get away with setting it a bit lower.

If you just have a 2.0 (or even 1.0?) system then I'd just set it to the lowest setting - 10Hz - because any bass redirection will get redirected nowhere due to the lack of a subwoofer. I'd then adjust any bass boost til it sounded just right ie making sure there's not so much gain that my speakers clip.


4 year thread revival. Epic.

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Plug & Play Jan 21, 2010, 07:27am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency

That was some time off to research a point....ffs. I hate this kind ofs**t.

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G. G. Jan 21, 2010, 09:08am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Cutoff frequency
what is it with newbies replying to threads that are several years old as if it was just opened yesterday.... What do they do all day.... searches on whatever tinkles their nipples and then answer to threads that has been dead for several years?? And then when they do that..... they disappear into non existence.


Original thread poster - " how do I make my Pentium II go faster ? "

Newbie answers to thread 5yrs later - "well, you need to check your motherboard and then do blah blah blah blah blan....."


by now.... the original poster has either a current system or overseas in some far reaches of the 3rd world helping villages digging water wells.


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Daniel du Prie May 06, 2010, 06:09am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: May 06, 2010, 06:16am EDT

 
>> Re: Cutoff frequency
GG - we do it just to baffle and faze people like you I'm sure :P
And for the Cult of the Trace lol

(Actually the real reason I added to a 5 year old thread is because in my country this thread happens to show up on page 3 of Google search results when you search on this topic. Just because a thread is not "live" doesn't mean it's disappeared into a black hole. The next person who wonders WTF is a cutoff frequency anyway and lands on that search result might benefit from the extra info. Or not. Isn't that what the internet is supposed to be all about - a never fading, ever growing free flow of information? Plus I was bored and had time to kill. I admit it. I'm a nerd.)


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