Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 804 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s September 20 - 01:52am EDT 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / Case Modding /
 

  Can I run a power supply outside of the case? 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Jordan B Jul 22, 2006, 08:28pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List Replies: 14 - Views: 9351
Hi hardware experts,
I bought a giant Zalman CNPS7700 fan to keep my machine quiet, and upon installation I found that while the fan fit on my motherboard, it ran into the power supply. "Screw it" I said, and took the power supply out and installed the fan anyway. I was thinking of modding my case to have the power supply a little higher, sticking out of the top of the case. But that would be ugly and it wouldn't fit on my computer stand. I'm wondering, can I just run the power supply from outside of the case? The cords would reach. Is that dangerous at all? I remember learning somewhere that the case was grounded, and wondered if the power supply had to be touching the case for that to work. If it was touching the outside of the case would it work?
Thanks,
Jordan


Want to enjoy fewer advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
Jul 22, 2006, 08:30pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
It should work fine. I've done it before (but not as a permanant solution, only while testing). The ground is provided through the ground plug on the PSU to your electrical outlet. Just make sure that the fans have plenty of ventilation.

Liquid Shadow Jul 22, 2006, 08:30pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
I don't think there should be a problem as long as you have the PSU mounted securely on something.



--------------------------------------------------------------
ADK 1Q AR Laptop
Core i5 520M | 4GB RAM | ATI HD4570
Jordan B Jul 22, 2006, 08:35pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Holy moly that was fast! Ok thanks--yeah I think I might mount it on my computer stand with parts from an old computer. I just found a commercial external power supply too so I'm glad I'm not the only one. Thanks again!

Liquid Shadow Jul 22, 2006, 08:37pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Yep HWA is a very active forum hehe.



--------------------------------------------------------------
ADK 1Q AR Laptop
Core i5 520M | 4GB RAM | ATI HD4570
Jordan B Aug 11, 2006, 12:50am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Heya,
So I ran the power supply outside the box and it's been running fine until now. The problem is that because the cables are so short, the power supply is very close to the machine and the cords are very tight. I installed some more RAM the other day and accidentally knocked the motherboard power supply out; the computer wouldn't boot until I plugged it back in.
Today the mouse stopped working. I tried rebooting and it took forever to shut down, so I force shut it off. On a reboot the monitor was slow to come on, then the machine froze again. I turned it off and now the monitor won't turn back on. When I hit power the drives spin and the fans spin, but I don't get any POST beeps.
What gives? I checked all the power connections and they're fine. The monitor's plugged in as is everything else. I've unplugged all USB devices. The keyboard light does not come on and the computer is unresponsive.
Don't know if this adds or just confuses things, but I thought I'd mention that USB's been more and more on the fritz for me. My mouse flies around the screen, my Skype phone has gotten stuttery, etc. Is this a systematic motherboard failure that's just been getting worse and worse?
Thanks,
Jordan

Jordan B Aug 11, 2006, 01:04am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
I pulled out the new memory and still no go.
Looking at my diagnostic leds, it gets past System Power ON (which means the processor is not damaged, yay), but hangs on Early Chipset Initialization.
Could this be an overheating issue?

Dublin_Gunner Aug 11, 2006, 04:48am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Make sure to check all of the power cables are plugged in and secure. Also make sure that nothing is obstructing airlfow to & from the fan(s) on the PSU.

Lancool PC K62
Phenom II x3 @ 3.5Ghz
4GB DDR2-800
ASUS GTX570 DirectCU II
john albrich Aug 11, 2006, 06:29am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Removing the PSU did effectively eliminate one case fan. Unless you replaced the open position with another case fan. It's possible overheating is at work, but if you've been monitoring ambient temps and not seen anything unusual, that's probably not it. Unfortunately, it can be hard to detect isolated hot-spots on the mobo.

When you accidently unplugged the mobo power...was power on? (possible damage to mobo electronics, possible disk data loss/corruption)

Was the unplugging particularly violent or at an angle? (possible connector/cable/mobo damage)

Does the mobo plug have a locking clip? (possible connector/cable/mobo damage)

and, of course, the CPU heat-sink must be 100% properly affixed. Any error in mounting the new heat-sink/fan assembly to the CPU can cause unpredictable results.

Jordan B Aug 11, 2006, 09:22am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
Thanks for your responses.
All of the cables feel like they're plugged in, but it may be worth unplugging / plugging in again.
I did not replace the PSU fan because the zelman fan is giant and it said it would cool off other components around it. Don't know about hot spots though. Right now I have a big gap where the power supply was and you can see the zelman fan spinning. I was monitoring system temps and the processor didn't go above 65 C and the system 55 C. I had alarms set if it did; sometimes it would go off if I put the zelman manually on a low speed but I've been running it on high ever since.

Mobo was not on when I unplugged it, but I did try turning it on with it partially plugged in before I realized what the problem was. Plugging it back in showed no immediate problems. The connector has a locking clip and does not look damaged.

Should I try reinstalling the fan? I'll try reconnecting all the cables too.

Thanks,

Jordan

john albrich Aug 11, 2006, 07:07pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
The Zalman will basically sit there and stir the air....VERY effectively. But, it won't make a lot of diff as far as air volume into or out of the case goes...and that external cool air being brought in, and the warm air being forced out, are what cool your system and the components.

If by removing the PSU you created a net reduction in cool air volume flowing in to or warm air out of the case, then you'll likely see more heating overall.

Peter West Aug 18, 2006, 09:20pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
The PSU usually has a fan that sucks air out of the case above the CPU. If you remove the PSU from a standard case then you might need to increase the airflow out of the case by using additional fans. However, if you're not overclocking then I'd not expect this missing fan to be a problem.

I have a custom designed case so I can travel with a full PC. I've had both an X-Connect 500W and now a Silverstone Strider 600W. They both come with removable cables and my PSU sits happily outside the case. Now my case has a fully reworked fan design so there are no hot spots. Just to add to the externalized bit my HDD's and DVD are also external. Not specialized external devices but the same old HDD's and DVD drive that would go inside the box. Never once have I had a problem with the HDD's overheating.

Best regards,

Best Regards,
Pete.

DFI LanParty 925XT2 (RIP)
Gigabyte GA-8N-SLI Pro
3.4Ghz P4
2 Gig Corsair XMS
BFG 7800GT OC. (500/1202)
Aug 18, 2006, 10:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
The PSU usually has a fan that sucks air out of the case above the CPU. If you remove the PSU from a standard case then you might need to increase the airflow out of the case by using additional fans. However, if you're not overclocking then I'd not expect this missing fan to be a problem.

Yeah, but whether or not you're overclocking, if the PSU vent fan is the only thing keeping your CPU/GPU/etc from a catastrophic failure, then that's a problem by itself. :|

Jordan B Aug 23, 2006, 02:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
So I probably fried the machine, huh. I took it into a repair shop and they said the mobo was no good, and there was some charring/browning on the ATX power connector. He said there was no way to tell if the processor got fried too. I wonder if I overheated it.
So I need a new mobo and a new case that can handle and properly cool my components.
I had my last mobo before this one fry too, the atx connector was totally fried, so I replaced the power supply, memory, board, processor, fan, graphics card, everything but the case and the hard drives. In the possibility that there was a surge, is my power supply ok? It's 350W and still powers the drives and fans so I think it should be. The last one was only like 200W which is why I think it got so fried.
Here's my email to the repair guy, your guys' input is appreciated as well. They sell Orion cases, would you guys recommend them?
Thanks!
---
If the motherboard looks like it was shocked, do you think the power supply is ok? Is there any way to test that?
What kind of motherboard would you recommend? I would need one that has enough space for the fan,
(list here: http://www.zalman.co.kr/product/cooler/7700-775MBlist_eng.htm )
that supports the processor (P4 2.8 Ghz Socket 775),
that supports the graphics card (AGP 8x Radeon Pro 9800 128 MB)
and supports the memory (Kingston 1GB DDR400 C3, # KVR400X64C3AK2).
Should I just get another one of the same mobo (MSI Neo 3 865PE), or wouldn't you recommend that? I was quite happy with it until it fried.
What kind of case would you recommend? I agree that I would need a bigger case, but don't know anything about motherboard sizes or case types. How soon could you get one? Likewise, I don't know enough about my memory type to know what would be compatible and what wouldn't be.
I think I would probably like to get your recommendations on a case and mobo, and buy the case from you guys, and then order and install the mobo myself. I can install the components myself, but I appreciate your help and I would like to buy something from you guys.
Thanks,
Jordan

Jordan B Aug 23, 2006, 03:15pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Can I run a power supply outside of the case?
I've ruled my options down to three boards, the Asus P5P800 SE, the ECS 865PE-A7, and the DFI 865PE-TAG if anyone has any recommendations...All seem to be compatible with the Zalman.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.asp?N=2000200280+107...tegory=280
Thanks


Write a Reply >>


 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.