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  Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound 
 
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Heather F Jan 26, 2007, 12:50pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Hi everyone. My computer will not turn on. It isnt making any noise, fans arent running...etc. All that is going on is the green light on the back is blinking and a clicking/ticking sound is made with each blink. Any advice on what to try? I am a computer novice with hardly any computer knowledge when it comes to hardware. I dont have lots of cash to take it to have it looked at so i was hoping I may be able to fix the problem.
one more thing....i had gone away for the weekend and the computer was on when i left. when i came home there had been a power failure and my cmputer had of course been shut down. This is when the problem happened i suppose...i noticed it when i got home from my trip. thanks

heather :)


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phil Jan 26, 2007, 01:09pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
1. is this a laptop or a desktop?
2. if it is a brandname computer what is the make and model# ?
3. where is the green light located? (ie, on network card, next to power cord.. etc)

as much information as possible would be of great help, or pictures.. if you have a digital camera you could take a picture of the mystery green light and post it to a site like http://www.photobucket.com so we could see what you're talking about.

---
can't access HWA unless I use a proxy... lol

pfft ..f**k that! (almost sounds like work)
Heather F Jan 26, 2007, 01:23pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 26, 2007, 01:24pm EST

 
>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking light on back and ticking sound
ok....it is a desk top, it is an HP pavilion a610n model.

the green light is on the back of the tower in the upper left hand corner under the power cord. it is the only "working thing" at this moment! it just blinks non stop if i plug in the computer. with each blink is a clicking/ticking sound. when i unplug the computer totally from the wall the light slows down the blinking and slowly stops. i think it is the power supply light? i unplugged the power cord from the computer and let it sit for quite a while (over a day) and still nothing. any ideas? do i need to jsut take it somehwere and find the cash?!!! is my computer shot...does this mean i have lost everything on it? can you tell im stressed about this???

by the way...i am using a second computer of mine from the same plugs/outlets that the HP was hooked up to and this one works fine.

thanks.....heather

john albrich Jan 26, 2007, 02:37pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
I would suspect that your computer documentation should tell you what the LED is for.
IF it is for Power Supply Unit (PSU) status indication, the blinking may tell you specifically what is wrong.

The odds are that the PSU was damaged by the power glitch. You might want to order a crude go/no-go PSU tester US$10-25 from place like geeks.com or tigerdirect.com etc. Ultimately it's a good basic test tool to have available. Examples:
http://www.geeks.com/details.asp?invtid=PS-124&cat=PWR
http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-detai...CatId=1107

Be warned that with a suspect PSU, any diagnostic work you subsequently perform may FURTHER damage components in the computer, including the motherboard..

If that is not an acceptable risk, then wait until you have at least run the basic PSU test using the test tool from above.

If that is an acceptable risk to you, then you might proceed with further diagnostics.

In the meantime, disconnect all power cables in the computer except for the mobo cable. Then, power up the computer again. If it still has the same symptoms, then it's likely either your PSU, the mobo, or both.

If it's not blinking, the fans come up etc. then power down, then you can go through a series of powering off, adding one of the disconnected devices at a time and power up until you find the offending device(s)

Note: even if you determine the PSU has failed, you may find that after replacing the PSU there are additional failures within the computer.

Note: even if the PSU tests good, you may wish to consider buying a better PSU with higher capacity. A better PSU can provide better protection from power-line/AC-mains transients and glitches.

john albrich Jan 26, 2007, 02:46pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 26, 2007, 02:59pm EST

 
>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
You can get online .pdf documentation from HP for your a610n by going to this webpage,
http://welcome.hp.com/country/us/en/support.html?pageDisplay=support

selecting the

"See support and troubleshooting information" option,

and entering "a610n" in the field.

That will take you a set of options where you can get the documentation, or even do some basic online troubleshooting in a "chat" mode with an HP technician. Just click on the desired link.



Edited to include:
I went a little further myself, just to see what HP was providing in the documentation...

The a610n "Quick Start" guide at
http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c00188588.pdf
identifies the green LED on the PSU as the "Power LED". That's all it tells us.


Unfortunately, in the Troubleshooting section of the "Getting Started" manual at
http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c00188939.pdf
there is no indication of how to use the PSU "Power LED" as a diagnostic.

phil Jan 26, 2007, 02:47pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 26, 2007, 02:50pm EST

 
>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
HP tech says: "green light flashes if the PSU(power supply unit) or the hardware is faulty"

picture referance in case you need it:
when i say 20/24 pin ATX cable.. i mean this
http://www.kjell.com/kjellfakta/atx/images/ATX-24pin.jpg
it's got a clip on the one side you have to push in before it will come out, reversly it will click when it goes all the way back on.

additional motherboard power cablehttp://atozincomputer.com/Productinfo_files/Atx%20power%204pin.jpg

floppy drive power cablehttp://www.walkerlaw.com/pham/power_cable_fdd.jpg

other PSU cables:
thes are 4 pin molex connectors, the will be connected to all of the other items inside your case, the only go in one way, as one side has it's corners cut off
http://www.hardwarezone.com/img/data/articles/2004/1192/tutori...r_conn.jpg

so, if you:
1. shutdown your machine (it's off already i presume)
2. unplug computer from wall (very important when checking the blinking light)
3. take the side of the computer case off (may need screwdriver)
4. disconnect all sources from the PSU, including hard drives, cd rom drives, fans, 20/24pin atx cable.. so everything that the power supply is plugged into.
5. plug the computer back in.
6 if the green light is still flashing then your PSU is bad (maybe possibly fixed by switching red 115v/230v to 230v and back again... sometimes it doubles as a breaker) , if it doesn't work then you need a new PSU, either under warrenty if that applies, or replace it yourself.
7. if the light goes green and stays solid, then something that the PSU was connected to is bad.. in most case the motherboard (says HP).. to test this:
7a. with computer off plug back in the 20/24 pin and 4 pin motherboard power cables ONLY , then try turning it on. if it flashes.. then VOILA, it's bad.
7b. if it starts up and stays green, turn it back off and plug in the cdroms, hard drives, and fans one by one and checking them individually for power faults.


please feel free to ask as many questions as you like.. and if you have the PSU replaced, make sure it's at least the same size or slightly (~50-100w)larger than the one you already have...

---
can't access HWA unless I use a proxy... lol

pfft ..f**k that! (almost sounds like work)
Heather F Jan 26, 2007, 02:59pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
you guys have ben great.....now i have to what you say!! this may sound funny but i am a bit intimidated to open the tower up. (dont laugh)

wanted to ask ..... read
This product contains components that are easily damaged by ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD). To reduce the chance of ESD damage, work over a non-carpeted floor, use a static dissipative work surface (like a conductive foam pad), and wear an ESD wrist strap that is connected to a grounded surface, like the metal frame of a PC.


so if im sitting on my lamintate floor in my kitchen am i good? if i have static electricity in my hair is that bad? i dont have a wrist strap. hope these arent silly questions

thanks,.....heather

john albrich Jan 26, 2007, 03:14pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
Not silly at all...it's a very important consideration. There are also ESD guidelines all over the net and a few in the HP online documentation as well.

In the case where it's just not possible to follow all the ESD procedures, there are some things you can do to minimize the risk...not eliminate...but minimize.

Assuming machine is disconnected from AC mains while you're working on the inside of it..

It would be better if you have a wooden surface to work on, but in lieu of that, you can reduce the ESD vulnerability by touching the PSU case before and while you unplug the various connectors for the diagnositc work. This helps keep you and the components at the same static potential level (which is what the wrist strap is also for)

Basically, anytime you plan to touch a component, "ground" yourself to the PSU case. Since you're not going to be actually removing parts at this time, I won't go into that aspect of it.

Afterwards, plug-in power as needed, and peform the diagnostics.

Same thing when it comes time to plug something back in...touch the PSU case first, and where possible, stay in contact with it during the procedure.

Avoid wearing synthetic clothing as well.

leastcmplicated Jan 26, 2007, 03:59pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
if you keep one hand (or a part of your arm) on the chassis (metal part of the computer) while both feet are on the ground, you'll be fine... don't be scared. you arent really moving anything except taking the PSU out and installing a new one... unplug the PSU wires from the motherboard, hard drive, cd drive and floppy (not the big ribbon ones, just the red/black ones with a white connector on the ends) also be careful when unscrewing the psu to keep a hand on it when you get the last screw off, you dont want it falling on your motherboard. good luck!

____________________________________
"Log off, that cookies**t makes me nervous" - Tony Soprano
"I don't know what to believe, I just show up and breathe anymore"

Greg M Jan 26, 2007, 05:33pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
I always leave my power supply plugged in but switched off when working in a case. This allows the case and power supply to remain grounded at all times and will provide a good way to ground yourself. As long as you touch your case every minute or two (as often as possible when dealing with the motherboard) and don't run around in your socks on carpet, you should be fine.

Most of my PC work has been done on a carpet floor following these guidelines.

----
FX-55, 2x 1GB GSkill, X1800XT (512MB), 2x250GB RAID-0, DFI SLI-D
http://www.gandmpc.com <-My 'project'
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phil Jan 26, 2007, 08:12pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
Greg M. said:
I always leave my power supply plugged in but switched off when working in a case. This allows the case and power supply to remain grounded at all times and will provide a good way to ground yourself. As long as you touch your case every minute or two (as often as possible when dealing with the motherboard) and don't run around in your socks on carpet, you should be fine.

Most of my PC work has been done on a carpet floor following these guidelines.

in this case i was told by th HP tech that the PSU would have to be unplugged from the wall... i guess it's got some sensor or something in it...

---
can't access HWA unless I use a proxy... lol

pfft ..f**k that! (almost sounds like work)
john albrich Jan 26, 2007, 11:44pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 26, 2007, 11:46pm EST

 
>> Re: Computer wont turn on, green blinking ight on back and ticking sound
Greg M. said:
I always leave my power supply plugged in but switched off when working in a case. This allows the case and power supply to remain grounded at all times and will provide a good way to ground yourself. As long as you touch your case every minute or two (as often as possible when dealing with the motherboard) and don't run around in your socks on carpet, you should be fine....


The ESD issue is to ensure there is no voltage difference between you and the various components. The system does not need to be plugged in to do that, and in fact some manufacturers and safety folks will tell you you don't keep it plugged in while you're working on the inside. (although, in general the real personal safety risk is low, there could always be a safety exposure due to faulty wiring or components. The safety exposure is increased substantially when the PSU is identified as possibly damaged )

ESD safety mats and wrist straps contain internal resistors to ensure low current paths both for the user and the equipment, and they are certainly recommended.

Greg, while your're method (excepting the plugged-in to AC mains ) is better than nothing, it still presents an ESD risk to the machine and components. Modern components can be damaged by voltage differentials as low as around 30 volts, and one can bulid up potentials of thousands of volts in seconds...especially on carpeted flooring. Although, if you're wearing socks then the moisture in the socks from sweat is likely reducing the ESD buildup...but it still can cause problems with very sensitive components.

ESD damage can be instantaneous or latent. If latent, then months can pass before the failure caused by the ESD finally occurs.



Another safety risk with a plugged in system, is that the power button could be accidently pushed "on" by you or a unknowledgeable spectator, or that the pin on the mobo connector that controls the PSU can be accidently shorted, or by logic device failure can be interpreted as "turn the PSU on" This will activate the fans unexpectedly as well as the high-current power rails.

If the PSU turns on, and you accidently short a high current rail for some reason (e.g. reflex response causes wire or tool to short something ) then it can cause sparks of molten metal which can blind or cause other injury. If the PSU fails to shut-down there is also the risk of fire and even the explosive destruction of some components.

If you have extremely high-power fans then physical injury is also possible.

So, it's generally advised to disconnect the PSU from AC mains (and/or UPS ) when working in the system.


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