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  NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64? 
 
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Norman Charette Apr 02, 2007, 09:04pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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i finally figured out why i can't download a file that is 4.4 GB and it is apparently because i partitioned my hard drive as a fat32. what do u have your hard drive set up for... NTFS ? also, i never know whether to click for example, NTFS-quick or just NTFS, or Fat32-quick or just fat32?

Also, is it better to make two partitions- one for windows and one for everything else, as apose to just one main hard drive? because that is what I did, installing windows on one, and everything else on the other half.

but the main thing is, would NTFS allow me to download a file larger than 4GB? cus apparently the Fat32 doesnt?

PS I heard NTFS was a bit slower, but I'm not sure


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Dublin_Gunner Apr 02, 2007, 09:11pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 02, 2007, 09:11pm EDT

 
>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
You wont notice any difference in speed.

I have no idea why it wont let you download the file, I was not aware of any such restriction.

BTW, you should be able to convert the volume to NTFS without a full format

And yes, in general, I would recommend at least 2 partitions, 1 for OS, 1 for apps.

**edit
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/maintain...rtfat.mspx

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CrAsHnBuRnXp Apr 02, 2007, 09:41pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ntfs

NTFS is more secure than FAT32 and whenever you have the option to use NTFS, its better to use it.

As for speed, if there is a differnece, it is in no way noticeable.

For your title, do you mean FAT16, FAT32 and NTFS? No such thing as FAT64.

Adam Kolak Apr 02, 2007, 09:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
For Windows 2000, XP, and Vista, NTFS is really the only way to go. Yes, some people claim FAT32 is faster, and maybe it is, but the fact is, NTFS is really the best option.

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phil Apr 02, 2007, 09:57pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
the only real time you may want to use fat32 is on smaller drives ( less then 80gb) and you would like a more redundant file system for file recovery. as FAT tables are in inherently easier to see and recover. though if there was something that you didn't want to lose forever it should be backed up on dvd/cd anyway.

---
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FordGT90Concept Apr 02, 2007, 10:33pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
FAT64 doesn't exist. NTFS is FAT32's successor.

FAT is only good for small density hard drives (the smaller the better). NTFS should be used for everything else. In fact, I would never put FAT32 on a computer running an operating system that is capable of running NTFS.

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B Apr 11, 2007, 04:32pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
NTFS. I use for all my drives/partitions.

Microsoft said:
The Advantages of NTFS

The NTFS file system, introduced with first version of Windows NT, is a completely different file system from FAT. It provides for greatly increased security, file–by–file compression, quotas, and even encryption. It is the default file system for new installations of Windows XP, and if you're doing an upgrade from a previous version of Windows, you'll be asked if you want to convert your existing file systems to NTFS. Don't worry. If you've already upgraded to Windows XP and didn't do the conversion then, it's not a problem. You can convert FAT16 or FAT32 volumes to NTFS at any point. Just remember that you can't easily go back to FAT or FAT32 (without reformatting the drive or partition), not that I think you'll want to.

The NTFS file system is generally not compatible with other operating systems installed on the same computer, nor is it available when you've booted a computer from a floppy disk. For this reason, many system administrators, myself included, used to recommend that users format at least a small partition at the beginning of their main hard disk as FAT. This partition provided a place to store emergency recovery tools or special drivers needed for reinstallation, and was a mechanism for digging yourself out of the hole you'd just dug into. But with the enhanced recovery abilities built into Windows XP (more on that in a future column), I don't think it's necessary or desirable to create that initial FAT partition.

When to Use FAT or FAT32

If you're running more than one operating system on a single computer (see my earlier column Multibooting Made Easy), you will definitely need to format some of your volumes as FAT. Any programs or data that need to be accessed by more than one operating system on that computer should be stored on a FAT16 or possibly FAT32 volume. But keep in mind that you have no security for data on a FAT16 or FAT32 volume—any one with access to the computer can read, change, or even delete any file that is stored on a FAT16 or FAT32 partition. In many cases, this is even possible over a network. So do not store sensitive files on drives or partitions formatted with FAT file systems.

Apr 11, 2007, 11:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
The only thing that I use FAT on anymore is my USB flash drive. Using NTFS means that you have to (should) "Safely Remove" it before disconnecting it.

The earliest version of Windows that I would ever install these days would be Windows 2000 (on my slow server machine), and there's no reason to use anything other than NTFS on that OS or anything higher.

Nemex 666 Apr 20, 2007, 07:13am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
Mark Allen said:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ntfs

NTFS is more secure than FAT32 and whenever you have the option to use NTFS, its better to use it.

As for speed, if there is a differnece, it is in no way noticeable.

For your title, do you mean FAT16, FAT32 and NTFS? No such thing as FAT64.



FordGT90Concept said:
FAT64 doesn't exist. NTFS is FAT32's successor.

FAT is only good for small density hard drives (the smaller the better). NTFS should be used for everything else. In fact, I would never put FAT32 on a computer running an operating system that is capable of running NTFS.



Sorry but you are incorrect.

Although you are correct in that an actual file system called FAT64 does not exist, it does exist in principle in the form of the new exFAT file system being developed / was on connect.microsoft.com last year for testing.

NTFS was introduced in July 1993 with Windows NT 3.1, FAT32 wasn't introduced until August 1996, NTFS is not a successor of FAT32 in any way, they are fundamentally different file systems, FAT file systems use Linked List(s) as a basis for it's file allocation where as NTFS uses Bitmap Extents, FAT file systems us a table as it's directory contents, NTFS uses a B+ Tree.

SuPeR Xp Apr 20, 2007, 08:18am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
NTFS is a much better. I never heard of FAT 64

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Beavis Khan Apr 20, 2007, 09:12am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
Norman Charette said:
but the main thing is, would NTFS allow me to download a file larger than 4GB? cus apparently the Fat32 doesnt?


Yes it would. The maximum file size on a FAT32 volume is 4GB. The maximum file size under NTFS has no hard upper limit - in reality it is limited only by the size of the volume on which it resides (which itself is limited to 16 exabytes or some nonsense...billions of gigabytes)

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Silvana Miller Nov 27, 2007, 02:37pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
I had the same 4gb limit problem. You can easily go to your command prompt in accessories and then use the convert.exe If you want to go to NTFS for your c-drive then the command is
convert.exe c:/fs:ntfs
The program requires about 3.5gb physical HD space to run properly and convert.
Your windows and all files stay intact. The conversion took me about 15 minutes.
My problem now is that windows xp is running SUPER slow. It ran fast and fine before. My speed is 3gb/mhz and my hd is 136gb of which windows only recognized 126 or 127.
Why is my computer now so super slow?
Open browser: 15 seconds instead of a fraction of a second
outlook: 30 seconds instead of a fraction of a second.

I'm scared to even check out the programs that I run daily.
I ran some optimizing programs to no avail.

Archangel Nov 27, 2007, 04:21pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
DublinGunner said:
You wont notice any difference in speed.

I have no idea why it wont let you download the file, I was not aware of any such restriction.



**edit
http://www.microsoft.com/technet/prodtechnol/winxppro/maintain...rtfat.mspx



Fat doesn't take any single files bigger than 2 gigs

Robert Grimes Dec 20, 2008, 02:20pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
I would like to say that I am fairly knowledgable about computers and fairly fluent in geek. However, I need some advice. I am thinking about buying a WD Passport 320 gb usb powered drive. It comes standard with FAT32 system. Seeing how it is larger than 80 gb, owuld you recommend reformatting as NTFS? If so, how would I go about it without screwing the new drive up.

Shawn Langley Dec 20, 2008, 02:41pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
This threads a little old.... anyhow.....

You cant really screw up the drive irreversibly by formatting and partitioning so go and experiment to your hearts content -

However with a large drive i'd always use NTFS has very few downsides (non really if your just using windows) and you will always kick yourself when you realize that "ahem" game ISO wont bloody go on the drive to take to your mates after all thats what you buy a big drive for to transport big things. (referring to the 4 Gig file limit of FAT)

As for putting it in NTFS, assuming your using vista it should be as easy as popping the drive in, go to my computer, right click on it and format and select NTFS for the file system.

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bossa ritchie Dec 21, 2008, 06:44pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
Microsoft says: You cannot create a file larger than (2^32)-1 bytes (this is one byte less than 4 GB) on a FAT32 partition.. but an NTFS file system will allow bigger files on your drive. and there is also no FAT64 after FAT32 we have NTFS, some people swear by NTFS I have only came across 1 problem with NTFS and that is the game Championship Manager which ran a lot faster on FAT32.

Globe Trotter Jan 09, 2009, 09:23am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
FAT64 is also called exFAT(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ExFAT).

Turok B Apr 17, 2009, 12:30pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
On internal drives if it is your primary drive NTFS is the best period. so long as you are using windows.

On linux ext3 is the best for root and reiserfs is the best for /home.

For Externals:
If you have multiple files that are greater than 4 gigabytes NTFS is better.
Fat64 does exist it also sometimes called exFAT it is very good because it has a much higher cluster size allocation potential which makes reading video files much faster. Fat64 can only be formated on drives by a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate as far as I know.
I tried it for a while and it made my 320gb external with all 1080p video files (approx 10 GB each) run much faster and prevented vlc from crashing.
FAT32 is good because it doesn't have drive permissions by default which makes it easier to mount and read/write

Apr 17, 2009, 12:43pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 17, 2009, 02:46pm EDT

 
>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
Turok B (90915) said on Apr 17, 2009 at 09:30am PDT:
Fat64 can only be formated on drives by a computer running Windows 7 Ultimate as far as I know.

exFAT is also supported by Vista SP1, and there's an official driver download for XP as well. It's not specific to Windows 7.

exFAT for Windows XP x86: http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=1cbe3...dff5e30f61

For exFAT on Windows XP x64, you can use the drivers from Vista x64. I had done this a while back and it was buggy, but this was probably because I was using pre-release exFAT drivers. I've heard they're pretty solid now when used on XP x64.

Jean Smith Jul 21, 2010, 10:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jul 21, 2010, 10:24pm EDT

 
>> Re: NTFS, FAT32 or FAT64?
Frankly, I am not very clear about the relationship between the three.
However, I got something useful information about NTFS and FAT32.
Perhaps you will be interested it.
:)
http://www.extend-partition.com/resource/convert-ntfs-to-fat32...ition.html


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