Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 1225 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s December 01 - 12:39pm EST 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / When stuff works, our experience with Lenovo Think...
 

  Share you warranty war stories 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2
Orange Juice Oct 17, 2007, 03:03pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Nice to hear about a really good experience with the warranty :) i for one purchased a Lenovo ThinkPad some time ago and experienced some issues with it too.Usually i don't really see the security related software preinstalled on laptops as a really necessary thing. They are not very easy to use by the common user, and i'm sick and tired to be called to assist my fellow colleagues in troubleshooting that. Well, this once i must admit i was curious enough to configure that fingerprint reader software.
To my surprise all worked fine. For a couple of days, that is. When i needed to log in the computer administrator account again it failed to recognize my fingers (any of the 4 i enrolled in the software). Luckily i had also put in a regular password. My choice at that time was to simply erase the stored fingerprints and work that again from scratch.
Few days later the machine would freeze in "checking embedded security chip" stage (or something very similar to that, and it made no difference if i changed it's status to active, hidden or disabled in the BIOS). Well at this point i found that the facilities that the blue ThinkVantage button lets you use are working very nice, e.g. i managed to completely back-up the data onto an external hard drive. Restored OS from the image on the hdd and i simply gave up on the security chip ever since.
As for the warranty.. i gave up on that. I live in Eastern Europe, Romania to be more precise, and although we're importing a lot of IT related products, seems we have a problem with the warranty. Called the store, they directed me to an authorized servicing IBM partner, and the prognosis was about 2 weeks (minimum). In that time the guy that used the laptop should have resorted to pen and paper probably, so i simply gave it up and hope for it to work with that part disabled.
Don't think it's about a single ThinkPad, no, we can be talking about 30.000$ worth of HP printing equipment too. I've had quite a few mishaps with part shipments for DesignJet models, older or top of the line, brand new ones. I sometimes wonder why do they sell in areas where they can't provide the appropriate support for these. I know about an HP customer that bought a scanner that needs it's mainboard replaced. It'll be here in Romania on December 27'th. If we think a bit about this prognosis... it's either sent by a sailboat, or it's simply going to enter production in a month or so.
"Yes sir, we know it broke down, but we first have to make another 2000 pieces of that scanner and after that we'll start producing spare parts. Thank you very much for your purchase."
There's even a particular large printer model that has a flaw somewhere, the internal hard drive breaks repeatedly. My firm pays for that thing every time it breaks (you guessed right, it's no longer covered by warranty) but the servicing guys tell me that it's a worldwide problem with that model, they don't know where it comes from, but it happens everywhere. So they stock up on that spare hdd's and change them every time they break. Every 3-4 months, that is. Clever way to sell spare parts, don't fix the problem :/

Want to enjoy less advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
Paul Smith Oct 17, 2007, 10:54pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Well, last spring, the gaming PC I built almost three years before (and upgraded since then) refused boot windows. All I got over the speakers was "Error: CPU Failure" repeating over and over again from the ASUS motherboard POST bios system.

Well, the MB was 2 years, 11 months old. Same for the CPU (AMD Athlon 64 3200+) . Both were under the 3 year warrenty. After hearing me explain the problem, the ASUS tech said that it could be motherboard or CPU. very hard to tell. I also called AMD and got pretty much the same answer. So I decided to replace CPU and see if that was the issue.

Since I had saved the original packing from when I built the PC there was no need to AMD to send me a box to ship it in. Got an RMA number, and off it went to the AMD facility. A week later a brand new, AMD Athlon 64 3700+ arrived. Not only had my 3200 been replaced, it had been upgraded!

I eagarly plugged the new CPU in and after double checking all the connections, powered up the machine only to hear the same horrible message. "Error: CPU Failure!".

Called ASUS, and got the same tech as before, she said they would overnight a shipping box for the MB so I could return it. Got the box the next day and I sent off the MB the following morning. A week later, the replacement MB arrived. Took my time and installed it, the new AMD Athlon 64 3700+ CPU chip. Powered it up only to hear the same horrible message...Error: CPU Failure.

I thought for a few and then decided to try some thing completely different. Could it be power supply? I dragged out another older PC, moved it close enough to plug it's power leads into the MB, Low and behold, the system booted perfectly! Good news in the end, I got an upgraded PC, warrenties on the MB and CPU extended another three years and a good friend had a spare 500w PS he sold me cheap to complete the repair.

Korg sends

dark41 Oct 17, 2007, 11:07pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Vitaliy (Administrator) said:
The reasons I suspect Windows was partially at fault is because I was running Vista which most likely has better safeguards against blatant hardware alterations such as BIOS flashing, particularly because this notebook has a TPM chip in it. It's possible that Lenovo hasn't fully tested BIOS flash utility under Vista with hardware security enabled. (For the record, this paragraph is purely my speculative suspicion).


Ah, that would explain a lot. As a disclaimer I should probably add that I've never run a BIOS update with Vista. Vista collects dust on my dual boot drive until more of the problems on it are worked out.

EX38-DS5
E8500@4.0GHz (445x9, 1.40v) TRUE Black
Corsair HX620W
2x2gb Kingston HyperX 9600
HIS IceQ4 HD4850
2X1TB F1s (RAID 0) XP Pro/Win7 Ult 64
Auzen X-Fi Prelude 7.1
Cambridge Soundworks 500w 5.1
G5, Antec 1200
dark41 Oct 17, 2007, 11:18pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Big Beavis said:
Vitaliy (Administrator) said:
For the record, the particular BIOS update in this article had only one "fix" in it - something related to what happens when notebook is removed from its docking station. I don't have one.


There's a perfect example of an update I would not install. dark41, I don't know if you're deliberately misreading my posts or what, but in the case of "F4 2007/05/11 Enhance memory performance and add Turbo options", that is a reason to update, and one I'd almost certainly take advantage of. Clear enough?


I don't believe I've ever replied directly to you, so no need for you to take my posts personally. My replies that are not directed to an individual are intended as general feedback with my opinions.

Plenty clear, although F5 with "enhanced system performance, Fix dual BIOS issue (Sometimes recovery from backup BIOS may fail) , and Fix PS2 keyboard compatibility issues" is probably an even more necessary update than F4 since the backup BIOS failure could also leave you with a dead system. It will be too late to update if the backup BIOS fails. Then there's that performance enhancement too.

I have no problem with not upgrading to features that you don't use. As I said, most BIOS upgrades include a performance enhancement of some type. In this particular example 2 out of 3 did. I wouldn't upgrade to F6 either myself to fix a PCI device option ROM compatibility issue that I don't use. But for our customers' systems, I would upgrade because I have no way of knowing who would and who would not be utilizing this feature. Thus, I also need to install it myself to make sure it's a good working BIOS before installing it on my customers' systems. :)

EX38-DS5
E8500@4.0GHz (445x9, 1.40v) TRUE Black
Corsair HX620W
2x2gb Kingston HyperX 9600
HIS IceQ4 HD4850
2X1TB F1s (RAID 0) XP Pro/Win7 Ult 64
Auzen X-Fi Prelude 7.1
Cambridge Soundworks 500w 5.1
G5, Antec 1200
Gerritt Oct 17, 2007, 11:56pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
dark41,

You're right, I'm old school.

I've heard variations on your argument many, many times from folks that just turned off thier power instead of doing a software controlled shutdown, or from folks with RAID controllers without a battery backed memory cache. Yes you can do it sucessfully 999 times out of a 1000, but that one time can bite.....HARD.

When doing something that may brick your HW, my experience has taught me to eliminate as many variables as possible.
A DOS/Linux environment off of a bootable floppy eliminates many of the possible points of incompatibility, thus is, in my eyes, is a better approach.

Granted, in a healthy system, the utilization of a GUI flash utility holds little or no risk above and beyond what you may get in a minimalist CLI based utility, but, there are times when attempting to repair an issue with a marginal system, that a BIOS upgrade is indicated, but it may be other additional issues; such as a weak PSU; that eliminating this system overhead may preclude a system being bricked.

Working with 10s of thousands of systems, the extra precaution of doing the minimal system CLI based approach has probably saved me a lot more heartache than the convinience of a GUI upgrade utility.

Once again, just my eyes/opinion, but an informmed one.

Gerritt





Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
CrAsHnBuRnXp Oct 18, 2007, 01:42am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Vitaliy (Administrator) said:
dark41 said:
Sorry, but I think this advice is old school. Years ago I'd have agreed with it all, but not anymore.

Gerritt said:
Don't update BIOS from Windows.

Why not? I've been doing it daily for 2 years and never had one fail.

I've done it numerous times on my desktop EPoX board.


Ive done it a few times as well.

dark41 Oct 18, 2007, 11:32am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Share you warranty war stories
Gerritt,
Fair enough. I'm not at 1000 BIOS updates via Windows yet, and rarely use Vista. But so far none have failed through Windows. Can't say that about updates via floppy disk, but then to be fair, I have no way of knowing if the update itself was corrupt or it was due to something with the process. Whatever works, I guess. I just think people should know that the updates work pretty well through Windows as well. :-)

EX38-DS5
E8500@4.0GHz (445x9, 1.40v) TRUE Black
Corsair HX620W
2x2gb Kingston HyperX 9600
HIS IceQ4 HD4850
2X1TB F1s (RAID 0) XP Pro/Win7 Ult 64
Auzen X-Fi Prelude 7.1
Cambridge Soundworks 500w 5.1
G5, Antec 1200

Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2

 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.