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  IC Diamond Thermal Compound 
 
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mothow Apr 11, 2008, 09:39am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 11, 2008, 09:40am EDT

 
>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
It didnt do squat for my system at frist .It was hard to get out of the tube.I had to let it sit in a cup of hot water for about 10 minutes.And after going through all that my temps were no better than before.But i will say after about 2 days i did see a 2/3c drop in temps with the same amibent temps

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Meats_Of_Evil Apr 14, 2008, 12:37am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 14, 2008, 12:44am EDT

 
>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
Where did you bought it from? Is it possible that you got low quality diamond paste? Or not enough carats in the paste, seeing as this is a hand made mix process I keep thinking that everyone could get ripped off very easily.

I would feel better If I made a batch myself.

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Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Apr 14, 2008, 01:24am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
I bought mine from HeatsinkFactory.com -- about the same results ... nothing at first, at best a few degrees. Not really worth the extra trouble vs. AS5 if you ask me. :~

john albrich Apr 14, 2008, 05:28am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 14, 2008, 05:53am EDT

 
>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
I thought this re-sorted chart on thermal conductivity might be of interest. If you want to see them alpha-sorted by material name, go to the web-site.

Note that while aligned graphite (k=1950) has a thermal conductivity much higher than even diamond, amorphous graphite (k=5.7) is extremely low. Yet, they are all the same element in the same state (solid)...just different allotropes.
http://hypertextbook.com/physics/thermal/conduction/
The best ordinary metallic conductors are (in decreasing order) silver, copper, gold, aluminum, beryllium, and tungsten. Diamond beats them all, and graphite beats diamond only if the heat can be forced to conduct in a direction parallel (|) to the crystal layers. The material with the greatest thermal conductivity is a superfluid form of liquid helium called helium II, which only exists at temperatures below 2.17 K. Since it is highly unlikely you will encounter this substance, it is really not worth thinking about except in the fact that it is an exceptional material.

(Note: Where there is a range of values, I placed the item in the lowest (e.g. worst case) thermal conductivity position.-ja)
Thermal Conductivity (k) for Selected Materials (~300 K except where otherwise indicated)
0.0_________vacuum, perfect
0.0001?_____mylar
0.00958_____freon 12, vapor
0.016_______water, vapor (273 K)
0.02 - 0.03___polyurethane foam
0.020_______air, 10,000 m
0.02 - 0.03___polyurethane foam
0.025_______air, sea level
0.025_______water, vapor (373 K)
0.026_______silica aerogel
0.03 - 0.04___wool
0.03 - 0.05___polystyrene foam
0.03 - 0.08___carpet
0.0307______helium I (< 4.2 K)
0.034_______feathers
0.035_______fiberglas
0.04 - 0.09___paper
0.04________cotton
0.05________ice cream powder
0.05 - 0.15___asbestos
0.05 - 1.50___concrete
0.05________polyester
0.05________straw
0.056?______zirconia
0.06________felt
0.0743______freon 12, liquid
0.09 - 0.14___wood
0.11________plywood
0.11________soap powder
0.14________ethanol*
0.15 - 0.27___plaster
0.15 - 0.45___neoprene
0.15 - 0.52___asphalt
0.15________particle board
0.152_______helium gas
0.16________snow (< 273 K)
0.18________brick
0.25________glycol*
0.25________methanol*
0.25________teflon
0.26________mica
0.27________sand
0.41________glycol-water*
0.49________methanol-water*
0.561_______water, liquid (273 K)
0.679_______water, liquid (373 K)
1.0_________limestone
1.1 - 1.2_____glass
1.75________marble
2.2_________granite
2.2_________water, ice (273 K)
2.8_________water, ice (223 K)
5.7_________carbon, graphite (_|_, amorphous)
6.74________plutonium
8.34________mercury
14__________steel, stainless__(273 K)
21.9________titanium
27.6________uranium
35.3________lead
45 - 65______steel, plain (273 K)
66.6________tin
71.6________platinum
80.2________iron
90.7________nickel
93.7________chromium
110_________bronze (273 K)
116_________zinc
120_________brass (273 K)
174_________tungsten
237_________aluminum
317_________gold
401_________copper
429_________silver
895_________carbon, diamond
1950________carbon, graphite (|, parallel)
~100,000?___helium II__(< 2.2 K)



*source data of these 5 * items from http://www.overclockers.com/articles609/
It should be noted that the actual k will depend on the percentage of water in the water/___ol liquid combinations.

Christian Sjavik Oct 15, 2011, 05:35pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
Do not spread the paste out. Only apply a pea sized amount at the center of the die and then allow the heatsink to spread it out as you place it directly on the bead. Whether you can see them or not, using a flat edge to spread the TIM out introduces air pockets in the TIM and those become insulators! Even if you could get the TIM evenly spread with no air pockets, as soon as you try and put the heatsink on the die, it will trap air underneath it - also insulating the die from the heatsink thermally. Think of it much like you would applying a screen protector to your smartphone, or tint material to a window... If you put it on flat, it WILL trap air. It needs to be rolled on and since you can't massage the air out of the TIM on your processor, you have to allow the TIM to roll outwards from the center by applying a bead of it at the center of the die and allowing the heatsink to roll the TIM outward from the center when even pressure is applied on the heatsink. I have both my GPU and CPU watercooled using this stuff and I can testify that this is the BEST application of IC Diamonds TIM or any other paste TIM for that matter simply because of the air pocket issue.

CrAsHnBuRnXp Oct 15, 2011, 06:02pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 15, 2011, 06:06pm EDT

 
>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
Thread revival ftw? Last post was 2 years ago. Check the date next time please!

Christian Sjavik Oct 15, 2011, 06:06pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
I just bought another tube of this stuff and was reading up on it again. I am in the process of building a twin quadcore xeon system and figured, I'd better use what I know works best, having tried most of the alternatives already. From what I've read, there is still a bunch of ambiguity out there regarding the best way to apply IC Diamonds, so I figured, I'd post what I know works best... and why not here! :)

john albrich Oct 15, 2011, 07:28pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 15, 2011, 08:35pm EDT

 
>> Re: IC Diamond Thermal Compound
Christian Sjavik said:
I just bought another tube of this stuff and was reading up on it again. I am in the process of building a twin quadcore xeon system and figured, I'd better use what I know works best, having tried most of the alternatives already. From what I've read, there is still a bunch of ambiguity out there regarding the best way to apply IC Diamonds, so I figured, I'd post what I know works best... and why not here! :)


While that may be true, it could seem like an attempt at SPAM for "IC Diamond" TIM. While not always the case, SPAMmers tend to post to old/abandoned threads, and usually have VERY new membership and/or low post counts. But, I'm certainly willing to give it the benefit of a doubt (given the thread's title).

Are you sure you meant "pea"-sized? Many articles I've read say "rice-grain" sized...although there can be a huge variation in both. Plus, it also varies depending on the CPU, so I'd personally prefer if people used something with defined measurements and articulated the geometry and how much surface area they were covering. But, "pea"-sized seems quite large.

Also, I expect the TIM application directions differ for heat-sinks that use so-called "HDT (Heatpipe Direct Touch) technology" (or similar) as found on heatsinks like Xigmatek's "Gaia"...this is because there isn't a single flat surface involved. I speculate this could introduce massive discontinuities while applying the material if one uses "typical" single-point TIM syringe application methods.


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