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  Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help. 
 
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Andreas Svensson Sep 06, 2008, 09:38am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Hi everyone.

Ok, I just bought a new CPU today and intend on replacing my old AMD 64 3200+ Athlon Venice. I'm kinda glad I got a hold of this one, since I understand AMD has discontinued the 939 socket which is what my mobo has. The CPU I've bought has already been used before, though still has a 1 year warranty, and it's called:

AMD Athlon64 X2 4400+

Even though it was originally boxed, it comes disassembled simply because as I said it's already been used. Now...

I think I have most of this covered, however I am here asking for any input and advice that you may think is good to think about when replacing a CPU, and also any criticism you may have regarding how I plan to do this (physically). I've never done it before with a CPU that wasn't boxed you see, so it will be my first time for example that I will using cooling paste to cover the topside of the cpu, something I am a little nervous about tbh.

One thing I want to mention is that there is some old cooling paste on both the cpu and the heatsink that I will have to remove. I am planning on doing this with acetone and "cotton buds" (not sure thats the word) to "scrape" the old paste off.

I have also understood that the best way to hold the cpu in my hand, is by the sides as to avoid hurting the pins underneath and also not getting unecessary sin fat on the topside.

Basically, once I am done with removing the old paste, I will put the CPU into the slot and after that start applying my own cooling paste. I have heard some ppl just put some of the paste in the middle, then "squeeze it out" using the heatsink, but I think I feel more comfortable manually spreading it out before I apply the heatsink. Feels like I have more control that way.

I guess that sort of covers it. After I will "just" put the heatsink on top of it, and then the cpu fan, and hopefully it will run...

Any input is greatly appreciated, maybe something I have missed and which is important to the overall procedure? I just don't want to miss something and end up f*cking up this cpu or my mobo...

Thanks in advance.

// Andreas


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Joshua Marius, LeThe Sep 07, 2008, 12:35am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.

You pretty much have the basics. I usually leave the processor on the motherboard when performing the cleaning just to make sure I do not screw up any of the pins. I also use a mixture of 50% isopropyl alcohol and 50% vinegar to get the old thermal paste off.

Finally, you can us the instructions here as general guidelines to apply the new paste: http://www.arcticsilver.com/arctic_silver_instructions.htm

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
Reason   Sep 07, 2008, 02:31am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.
+1 on what Josh said, you seem to have it down. I've always just used cheap rubbing alcohol to clean off my CPUs, although I don't OC either so I don't worry about every last degree of cooling. And I agree on the manual spreading. Seems to me like there's no way it will cover every last mm^2 (by simple pressure spreading) unless you put way too much on there. And of course you could actually lessen the total spreader/HS contact area.

Nice find on the 939 4400, did you eBay it? Higher end 939 dual cores were RIDICULOUS last time I checked.

_________________
Ultima Ratio Regum
Joshua Marius, LeThe Sep 07, 2008, 03:06pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.

I actually still own my Opteron 165 and DFI LanParty Expert which are Socket 939. They are still very good and powerful.

Enjoy!

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
Colin Burke Sep 07, 2008, 04:25pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Sep 08, 2008, 10:48am EDT

 
>> Best Practices
Make sure the paste doesnt squeeze out the sides. A small dab about the size of a quarter of your fingernail would work out just fine. And theres nothing wrong with lifting it back up again to check as long as the paste spreads evenly and stays on the chip.

Arctic sliver is the best :) Thermal paste :) around and it is well worth it for 5-10 bucks. Silver paste conducts much more heat than white silicone that comes with most CPUs. After market heatsinks are great too.

If you are concerned about noise, get a big fan that has a 4 pin connector. Big fans emit lower frequencies which is harder for us to hear, they move more air, spin slower, and they cover more surface area of a heatsink. 120mm and up would be a great pick.


I usually have cooled intels in the past and I dont know if my advisement is for naught because "AMDS always run cool" but theres the info in case you need it. ^_^ cheers.

Core 2 duo e7200 OCed at 3.16ghz
2gb of ddr2 800 OCed to 1066
8800gt overclocked 20%
all you need to know

Joshua Marius, LeThe Sep 07, 2008, 04:32pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.

Arctic sliver is the best heatsink around and it is well worth it for 5-10 bucks.

You mean thermal paste :)

Actually, to share some info, I did some research with about 8 different thermal pastes. Two were Arctic Silver 5 and Arctic Silver Ceramique. The others I obtained from eBay and some included with barebone computers.

I performed all tests under the same environments and computer usage, each one tested for over 300 hours to allow the settle in time. Results: Marginal, I think even negligible. Even the cheapest ones were able to keep up with all the Arctic Silver products. I believe it really boils down to a good all-copper heatsink with the biggest fan possible, and which sucks in air not down, but preferably from the fron of the case to the back, like this one: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835186134

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
mothow Sep 07, 2008, 05:31pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.
Reason said: [quote
Nice find on the 939 4400, did you eBay it? Higher end 939 dual cores were RIDICULOUS last time I checked.[/quote]
Yeah RIDICOUSLY low priced

ASRock Z97 Extreme 4 / i7 4790K / Corsair H80i / 4x4GB Crucial Ballistix Smart Tracer DDR3 1600 / 1TB Western Digital Caviar Black / 240GB Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD / 2x Evga GTX 670 FTW 2GB in SLI / Sound Blaster Recon3D Fatal1ty / Corsair HX1000w
Colin Burke Sep 08, 2008, 10:58am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.
Yeah, Front to back has always been my style. I have been rocking a first scythe katana for about 2 years now, it keeps my 3.17 e7200 at a cool 25c-30c I love it. I am surprised at your results! I will use that for future reference but I had once before did a little dusting of a customer's PC (a little, i cant stress that enough) and I changed the CPU compound from the stock silicone to arctic silver and it went down about 7c. However, you seem credible with your own website with 100,000+ hits :cool: Thanks so much for the info.

Joshua Marius, LeThe Sep 08, 2008, 11:49am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Sep 08, 2008, 11:50am EDT

 
>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.
Well you make a very good point. The testing just compared "brand new" recently applied thermal paste. Old thermal paste which has been in a computer for years will eventually wear out or not be as efficient anymore. Also, the previous applied thermal paste might have not spread properly, or was applied incorrectly.

It really depends on a lot of factors, even how you re-seat the heatsink. Dust in particular will raise your temperatures due to the fact that it slows down fans, cover up vents, and accumulates on top of a heatsinks for example, then stays over it like a heating blanket. So it's possible the combination of cleaning the dust + brand new fresh thermal paste might have knocked out the 7 degrees. I re-apply thermal paste at least every 1 to 1.5 years.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
Andreas Svensson Sep 09, 2008, 11:19am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Switching CPU - appreciate some input / help.

Just wanted to write a message and thank you for your input guys, I managed to get it done pretty well I think, the cpu hasn't been over 40degrees celsius so far and most of the time its around 35degrees, though I haven't put it under alot of stress yet. (been wanting to run warhammer online, which was the main reason for this upgrade and my new GPU, but us europeans are being royally screwed out of the open beta right now...)

You might be interested in knowing I actually decided to use the "dip in the middle" method instead of smearing it out "manually" so to speak. Mostly cus the simplicity in this method appealed to me after a while, and seemed reliable in terms of avoiding any air bubbles or uneven thickness in the thermal paste. Anyway it seems to have worked well so I'm glad :)

Reason said:
+1 on what Josh said, you seem to have it down. I've always just used cheap rubbing alcohol to clean off my CPUs, although I don't OC either so I don't worry about every last degree of cooling. And I agree on the manual spreading. Seems to me like there's no way it will cover every last mm^2 (by simple pressure spreading) unless you put way too much on there. And of course you could actually lessen the total spreader/HS contact area.

Nice find on the 939 4400, did you eBay it? Higher end 939 dual cores were RIDICULOUS last time I checked.


Thanks man, yeah I was damn happy to get a hold of it! Didn't even know there existed any dual cores for my old socket type, and the one I found I got of a local retailer for only 50euros. I mean it's used but what the hell it was worth the "gamble" for 50 euros and it's actually running smooth right now :)

// Andreas


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