Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 994 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s September 20 - 12:07pm EDT 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / HWA Community /
 

  Looking for a job as a student... 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, Next >>
Scumbag Blues Sep 23, 2008, 08:14pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List Replies: 29 - Views: 3557
Is quite the experience. I am currently attending the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario and I am studying to be a Computer Engineer. For my first coop term, I'm looking at different jobs most related to my field (although I am also able to look for electrical engineering jobs) including ones from AMD, nVidia, Intel, etc.

Is there anything you veterans can recommend me? What should I look for in a job? What was your first experience like? I am green, and nervous as f***! :P


~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
Want to enjoy fewer advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
Vitaliy (Administrator) Sep 23, 2008, 09:47pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Since most likely your goal is to learn things and not to make a quick buck I would suggest looking for something interesting. At smaller companies (or especially startups) you'll get to do a larger variety of tasks that actually matter. In contrast, you could spend month labeling network cables at some bank, and probably even get paid well to do it.. but yawn!

What are you interests? Web? Hardware? Wireless?

Scumbag Blues Sep 23, 2008, 09:58pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Vitaliy (Administrator) said:
Since most likely your goal is to learn things and not to make a quick buck I would suggest looking for something interesting. At smaller companies (or especially startups) you'll get to do a larger variety of tasks that actually matter. In contrast, you could spend month labeling network cables at some bank, and probably even get paid well to do it.. but yawn!

What are you interests? Web? Hardware? Wireless?


Yeah, I want to learn way more than making money. My interests lie mostly in hardware and software. Definitely not web although I can learn.

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
Sep 24, 2008, 09:40am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
My interests lie mostly in hardware and software.

That about covers ... everything. :~ Might want to narrow that down a bit.

A_Pickle Sep 24, 2008, 11:19am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
My interests are general. Now halp me.

Reason Sep 24, 2008, 02:21pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
If your interests are truly that general, try as many different things as you can. It'll help you narrow it down and it'll give you a better base to go from when you do narrow it down.

DO NOT, I REPEAT, DO NOT, get a job just for money. The job you choose is likely to influence your future path a great deal. Unless it's something you would have zero problem walking away from, you want to avoid "it's just until I ... " jobs if you can. I used to be a mover, and my opportunities for upward advancement were: truck driver (tons of hours, never home) or dispatcher (tons of stress) when what I wanted to be was a rock star. Because of my job I never had the time to put into what I loved, and when I stopped being a mover I had to go for entry level positions, which at 26, sucked nuts.

_________________
Ultima Ratio Regum
Sean Costello Sep 24, 2008, 02:37pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
I find male prostitution works out fairly well.




:P




why not join Geek Squad :D

______
Story of My Life- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c764JWVt5Fw
Suspended User Sep 24, 2008, 03:47pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
For me, personally, I went to places and told them I just want some experience and would work for free. I did that for a place fixing computers for a bit, then applied at HP, and they were impressed I had done some free work just to gain experience and hired me on the spot.

If you can do a couple weeks for free, it helps.

Gerritt Sep 24, 2008, 09:25pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
As previously alluded to, try to get a summer internship at a reletively small local computer services company.
Software in general can be a rough road with very little return at times. Most software projects, programming wise, these days are done by huge teams of people so it is mostly piecework or rework. I used to work in the same building and knew a bunch of the guys at EA/Tiberon and those guys had a game room, a music room, cots, couches, you name it, and their work attire was t-shirts, shorts and flip-flops, BUT when release dates were comming up, I've never seen people as stressed and working as many hours as those guys.
I've also mentored 5 different engineers that ended up at Microsoft either at Sun Valley or Redmond, only 1 stayed. The burnout ratio is so high that a very high percentage of hires don't stay long enough for the stock options to validate.
NOW having said that, Database Design, DataWarehousing, Data Mining and so forth is a dynamic growing field with a world of oportunity in scientific as well as business intelligence fields.

Now as to hardware. In the design field, EE related stuff, once again you are a cog in a machine, though there are lab oportunities available in the post-grad area. But is almost looking like you'll have to minor in Hindi and Chinese if you're going to be able to understand your labmates.
Now me, I'm in networking/telecom and security. All growth areas, and believe me we need more qualified engineers. I spend more than half my time going behind folks like IBM, Bellnexia, HP, etc,. to try to get things to work properly. We are heading towards fully convergent multipurpose networks, so the network infrastructure has become more complex by leaps and bounds, and there are always trade offs that have to be made, so it is highly dynamic. Insofar as Security, it can be a GAS especially in the case of forensic analysis and tracking those nasty hackers, or smaking the script kiddies (theres a huge difference). For instance, post 9/11 I was able to provide information on clandestine phone calls from the US to Pakistan in the months leading up to 9/11. I guess thats why we invaded Iraq...go figure.

The internship I mentioned before is a way of getting your feet wet in several different areas. For instance one summer intern at a local shop or something like the Geek Squad, the next try for an internship at a ISP, a NOC, etc. The field is wide open. A computer engineering degree is a way to open the door on litterally thousands of different jobs, so don't worry too much about which one you're going to take now, just enjoy the experience of getting the knowledge in a great field of work.

Tech recruiter hat off.... Good luck.

Gerritt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
Scumbag Blues Sep 25, 2008, 01:25am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Okay, time to be specific.

My interests lie in my program: Computer Engineering. Basically, engineering based on a fusion of hardware and software knowledge with applications such as health care, data bases, communication, robotics, business, security, entertainment and so on. In my third year, I can choose a computer engineering specific area of study which includes but is not limited to processors, memory, circuit design, robotics, etc.

Now, since my program is co-op only, the university has helped me to a great degree in getting ready for and finding jobs, but not exactly what to look for. So far, I've looked under the headings of Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Engineering in general and I have so far applied to 28 jobs including spots at bigger corporations like AMD, and smaller corporations which I cannot remember the names of. However, I have an additional 22 application chances left and I asked a general question hoping to receive a reply pointing out some general rules, do's, and don't do's, etc. Apparently, stating Computer Engineering isn't enough. Had I not been limited to Canada (due to expense and proximity of family), there were also positions at nVidia, IBM, Microsoft, Google and Facebook that interested me, not because they are big and well known companies, but due to the fact that the job in question was very much related to my field.

Although humour is great, I'd appreciate it if I received proper answers. No, I don't want to delegate myself to the spawn of hell that is Geek squad (especially not when I'm working on my P.Eng), and no, sarcasm isn't going to help me either.

However, I'd like to thank you Gerritt, Reason and Kieran for the information so far. My co-op work term begins January 2009 and runs until the end of April 2009 where I return to studying for another four months.

Additionally, what do employers tend to look for in interviews? How much adjusting will I have to do with large corporate work environments such as AMD? Additionally, is there a way to avoid "burnout"? Engineering really does seem like something I love and want to do. I would hate to want to walk away from it all...

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
Suspended User Sep 25, 2008, 03:28am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
They don't look for you to brag about yourself, but they look for someone who is absolutely keen to do the job. Someone who is bursting with enthusiasm about it. I mean, don't jump around the room to show it, just explain what it means to you to get a job within the I.T. sector and explain why this is important to you and how you plan to make this decision work for you and adapt for you.


Reason Sep 25, 2008, 03:57am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
I find it difficult, and I think a lot of others do too, to find a balance between expressing what you need and want from a job and what they want from an employee. I tend to focus on "what can this job do for me? Pay? Benefits? Fun?" and of course an employer is more focused on productivity, efficiency, and stability.

As Kieran said, enthusiasm goes a long way, especially when you're starting out. Since your work skills are not competitive you have to show them that you're still worth their effort and/or money. You want to make them want you.

Once you do get hired, make sure you understand your role and your goals. It's ALWAYS better to pester your boss about how to do stuff right in the beginning, than to learn to do it wrong. Some bosses will be a**holes about it, but if they're a**holes when you ask how to do it right, imagine how much it'll suck when you do it wrong. More on that later.

A mistake I've made in school, but that is definitely applicable to employment, is to not meet the assignment requirements. If you're asked for A, B, and C, deliver A, B, and C. If you think it would be more appropriate to deliver D, E, and F, it's best to get the job done the way they want and offer/suggest/ask about DEF later. It can be OK to ask why ABC is preferable to DEF, but it's important not to look like you just don't want to do ABC.

One of the worst jobs I've had was middle management. Have you ever been a babysitter? Now imagine babysitting adults. Trying to explain to a grown-ass man why he needs to be doing the job he's being paid to do, and to do it the way he KNOWS is best, instead of taking shortcuts and milking the clock - so frustrating.

So don't be that guy. Ask yourself: Self, why am I here? The answer should generally include, "to get my job done." If the answer is "I don't know" then it's probably time to move on.

Politics is a reality, unfortunately. Not all the learning you do will be work-skills related. Learning to deal with a**holes, jerkwads, dicksmacks, buttmunches, and douchebags will help immensely. You may also learn some important lessons about trust, and those lessons are usually NOT fun to learn. Protip: never talks**t about someone you work with; it WILL get back to them. Worse, it will likely get back to your superiors.

I'm starting to rant here, bedtime.

_________________
Ultima Ratio Regum
Scumbag Blues Sep 25, 2008, 12:12pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Haha, I have nothing really to "brag" about so being keen is really all I have since I'm also competing with second, third, fourth and fifth year students from my university and others like it. Additionally, pay really isn't an incentive here since my pay isn't going to be amazing. What I really want and what I'm really looking toward is the experience which is definitely going to be far more valuable than a quick buck.

Yeah, Reason, I've talked to some people about what not to do:

1) Don't talks**t about your boss, even if to another since it reflects badly
2) Your boss isn't called "dude"

Also, what are my chances in even getting a job I applied for? Assume I apply to 50, how many do you think I'll get just being a green first year?

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
FordGT90Concept Sep 25, 2008, 12:16pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List

Edited: Sep 25, 2008, 12:17pm EDT

 
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
I wouldn't know about Canada but in the USA, a lot of businesses love hiring kids out of college because they are cheap, needy, and disposable; however, that was before the sub-prime mortgage crisis and subsequent economic downturn... At least in the USA, it's getting harder to find a job by the day with mean time between jobs measuring in the months.

I can't imagine the situation being much better in Canada but don't give up. The more you put yourself out there, the more doors will open.

________________________
If I remember what I forgot, I have not forgotten it.
Reason Sep 25, 2008, 12:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
The proverb/maxim I've heard is, you need a hundred "nos" before you can get a couple "yeses." That has not been the case for me but it does help keep your attitude and morale up. Anytime a place turns you down, well, that's just one more "no" out of the way.

Getting a job seems a lot like getting a chick When you have one, everyone wants you, and when you don't, you're damn near untouchable (in a bad way). I don't know if it's body language, or the whiff of desperation, or what, but it sure seems that way sometimes. I always tell myself (in either situation) that I don't need this, I could care less, and that always boosts my confidence which is key.

_________________
Ultima Ratio Regum
Dr. Peaceful Oct 01, 2008, 04:38am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Couldn't sleep, talk about burnouts, LOL. Just want to drop a few friendly pointers here for Mr. Dilbert and anyone interested about job hunting. Here are the points, gathered from my experience.

1. School != Job. School is for learning for life, not just for getting a job, and not necessary guarantee for one. Do your best to learn, not just for grades, actually learn the concepts for good. It is the best time to explore and learn different things, which may help you narrow down what you like to do in the future. Co-op and internship opportunities are for learning as well, learning what is it like in a real work environment. The ideal job you think you like to do, may not be what you think it is in the real world. Don't be discourage if you didn't find the correct career path at first shot, sometimes it does take time to realize what you really like to do. It may take a few wrong turns, before finding the right path. It's better late, then never.

2. Job hunting is the most unpredictable thing ever. On one extreme you can be hired within one week, on the other extreme, you could keep trying for months and still no luck. You could be hired in just one interview, you could also Not be hired interviewed five consecutive times from the same employer. But don't be discouraged, keep trying, keep trying, that's it. You see it's not your fault sometimes, because besides your qualification, there are many other factors that determine your chances to be hired. Keep in mind, often you're not the only one who's applying for the position, you could be facing fierce competitions. The employer could already have an internal candidate. There could be candidates that knows someone in the hiring company. Or sometimes it's just matter of luck, too.

3. Interview skills? Plenty of books to read about for this topic. Follow the rules, and don't be a fool. Be polite, be respectful, use proper etiquettes. Show your intelligence, knowledge, and good personality. Don't need to tell them everything, only what they need to know. Answer their questions the best you can. If you don't know, just say so. No one knows everything and they know that. Don't be a smart-ass. And don't ever say, "you have to hire me because I'm the best". XD . Different employer looks for different things. Different position requires different things. Adjust your strategy, and do your research. Again, if it didn't work, try again.

4. Job != School. Job is work, period. The employer pays you to do the work, that you're hired for. No matter what job it is, there will be duties to perform, rules to follow, responsibility to finish assignments, some repetitive tasks to do, people to deal with, as well as work politics and rumors. Unlike school, your hard work not necessary will get you better "grades" (i.e. praise / raise / promotion). It's all depended on the nature of your employer and management. Just do your best and enjoy your life. Only a small percent of what you learn in school will directly apply to your work, initially you will need to learn a lot of new practical skills. As they say, school only gets you the first job. That is no graduation, you could work for place for your whole life, if you never get tired of it, even though you learn everything you need to learn about the job. If you do get tired of it, move on and get a more interesting job, if you can (may not be easy if there are family who depended on you). There's nothing worst than spending 40 hours or more a week for something you don't like or bored.

5. Don't ever say I have such such degree, and want me to work for this?! It is not uncommon to find geniuses who are jobless. Don't ever look down on "lower" jobs. Because no jobs are meant to be "permanent". You never know one day, you will be out of your "glamorous" job for reasons you can't predict - back stabbing, bad economy, company downsizing, poor health, disaster, etc, and find yourself making ends meet working for "lower" jobs. Big name companies, not necessary means good things. Like already mentioned. They could be extremely competitive. They could divide their job responsibilities rather narrowly, i.e. you don't get to learn much. Furthermore, the bigger the company, the smaller the significance of each employee, you're nothing but a number. You boss will need to report to his boss, his boss will need to report his boss's boss... will take a thousand years before the top boss actually know that you actually did the work. XD Smaller companies may provide you more opportunities to learn and better chance to progress.


That's all I can think of. Anyone want to add more? And, Good luck!

Scumbag Blues Oct 01, 2008, 08:47am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Dragon Peaceful said:
Couldn't sleep, talk about burnouts, LOL. Just want to drop a few friendly pointers here for Mr. Dilbert and anyone interested about job hunting. Here are the points, gathered from my experience.

[quote]1. School != Job. School is for learning for life, not just for getting a job, and not necessary guarantee for one. Do your best to learn, not just for grades, actually learn the concepts for good. It is the best time to explore and learn different things, which may help you narrow down what you like to do in the future. Co-op and internship opportunities are for learning as well, learning what is it like in a real work environment. The ideal job you think you like to do, may not be what you think it is in the real world. Don't be discourage if you didn't find the correct career path at first shot, sometimes it does take time to realize what you really like to do. It may take a few wrong turns, before finding the right path. It's better late, then never.


Yeah, this I find really true. In High School, I was basically given a choice to actually learn the concepts or simply memorize "answers" for regurgitation. I chose to learn which I enjoyed far more than just regurgitating information. Unfortunately, some of my class mates chose otherwise.

2. Job hunting is the most unpredictable thing ever. On one extreme you can be hired within one week, on the other extreme, you could keep trying for months and still no luck. You could be hired in just one interview, you could also Not be hired interviewed five consecutive times from the same employer. But don't be discouraged, keep trying, keep trying, that's it. You see it's not your fault sometimes, because besides your qualification, there are many other factors that determine your chances to be hired. Keep in mind, often you're not the only one who's applying for the position, you could be facing fierce competitions. The employer could already have an internal candidate. There could be candidates that knows someone in the hiring company. Or sometimes it's just matter of luck, too.


I've just been selected for one job so far. Wish me luck at the interview. :D

3. Interview skills? Plenty of books to read about for this topic. Follow the rules, and don't be a fool. Be polite, be respectful, use proper etiquettes. Show your intelligence, knowledge, and good personality. Don't need to tell them everything, only what they need to know. Answer their questions the best you can. If you don't know, just say so. No one knows everything and they know that. Don't be a smart-ass. And don't ever say, "you have to hire me because I'm the best". XD . Different employer looks for different things. Different position requires different things. Adjust your strategy, and do your research. Again, if it didn't work, try again.


Yeah, I've been reading on interviewing but I wanted to see if anyone had personal experience to share.

4. Job != School. Job is work, period. The employer pays you to do the work, that you're hired for. No matter what job it is, there will be duties to perform, rules to follow, responsibility to finish assignments, some repetitive tasks to do, people to deal with, as well as work politics and rumors. Unlike school, your hard work not necessary will get you better "grades" (i.e. praise / raise / promotion). It's all depended on the nature of your employer and management. Just do your best and enjoy your life. Only a small percent of what you learn in school will directly apply to your work, initially you will need to learn a lot of new practical skills. As they say, school only gets you the first job. That is no graduation, you could work for place for your whole life, if you never get tired of it, even though you learn everything you need to learn about the job. If you do get tired of it, move on and get a more interesting job, if you can (may not be easy if there are family who depended on you). There's nothing worst than spending 40 hours or more a week for something you don't like or bored.


Yeah I found this out while applying to my jobs. Basically, nothing I really learned except for programming in C# applied for any of my jobs. Most of what I'll need to know I'll learn while working.

5. Don't ever say I have such such degree, and want me to work for this?! It is not uncommon to find geniuses who are jobless. Don't ever look down on "lower" jobs. Because no jobs are meant to be "permanent". You never know one day, you will be out of your "glamorous" job for reasons you can't predict - back stabbing, bad economy, company downsizing, poor health, disaster, etc, and find yourself making ends meet working for "lower" jobs. Big name companies, not necessary means good things. Like already mentioned. They could be extremely competitive. They could divide their job responsibilities rather narrowly, i.e. you don't get to learn much. Furthermore, the bigger the company, the smaller the significance of each employee, you're nothing but a number. You boss will need to report to his boss, his boss will need to report his boss's boss... will take a thousand years before the top boss actually know that you actually did the work. XD Smaller companies may provide you more opportunities to learn and better chance to progress.


Haha, yeah. I've spent the last six or seven years working my ass off at my dad's general store which is far from glamorous. I'm used to less-than-spectacular jobs so I won't be complaining.

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
Scumbag Blues Oct 01, 2008, 10:28am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
I have my first interview this Friday. Wish me luck! :P

By the way, I hope I get it, it sounds pretty damn sweet.

Job Description


GestureTek is a world leader in computer vision technology. Our Application Development team is seeking a programmer who shares our vision of leveraging GestureTek's patented gesture technology in numerous end user applications.

Position
Application Developer

Position Summary
As an Application Developer you will help to create games and other applications that utilize GestureTek's cutting edge tracking technology to create unique and compelling end user applications in a number of different contexts including gaming (PC, console, cell phone), physiotherapy, advertising and exhibition display equipment. You will be involved in all aspects of the software lifecycle including gathering requirements, design, development, and testing.

Main Duties
- Design, implement, test, and debug code,
- Implement routines that control the intelligence and movement of characters, vehicles and world objects,
- Write technical design specifications,

Qualifications
- Computer Science or related field, or equivalent training and professional experience
- Proficiency with C/C++
- Ability to use, test, debug, and extend code developed by other Software Engineers
- Good verbal and written communication skills.

Assets
- Game development experience
- Experience developing in C/C++
- Familiarity with Visual Studio 2005
- Familiarity with source control
- Familiarity with QA processes
- Familiarity with standard operating procedures for software development
- Avid gamer

About GestureTek Inc.
GestureTek Inc. (http://www.gesturetek.com) is the world leader in camera-enabled, gesture control technology. GestureTek technology is employed in a wide array of applications and environments: videogame consoles; museum/trade show exhibits; location based entertainment facilities; physical rehabilitation programs; corporate boardrooms for executive presentations; military control rooms; retail kiosks; interactive floors/windows and interactive billboards.

GestureTek Inc.'s headquarters are in Sunnyvale, California (Silicon Valley). Additional offices are located in New York City; Ottawa and Toronto, Canada; Seoul, Korea; and Tokyo, Japan.

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
FordGT90Concept Oct 01, 2008, 11:00am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Avid gamer.

:O!

________________________
If I remember what I forgot, I have not forgotten it.
Scumbag Blues Oct 01, 2008, 11:50am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
FordGT90Concept said:
Avid gamer.

:O!


I know, I thought that was really weird too? I don't think that's a *really* good requirement especially from a stand point of getting things done.

~

Intel i7 2600K @ 4.4GHz | Gigabyte P67A-UD4 | G.Skill Ripjaws DDR3-1600 4GB | XFX Radeon HD 6950
FordGT90Concept Oct 01, 2008, 12:21pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: Looking for a job as a student...
Seeing that they also included game developement experience, it sounds like they want to create software that works more like a game than anything else. No one can tell a game from not better than an "avid gamer." Ya know, the "fun factor." XD

________________________
If I remember what I forgot, I have not forgotten it.

Write a Reply >>

Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, Next >>

 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.