Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 1135 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s December 10 - 07:24pm EST 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / Engineering /
 

  3D Printing 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Adam Hornsby Feb 04, 2009, 03:51pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List Replies: 2 - Views: 1206
I am not sure where to post this, so please bear with me. I am going to do a product design course at uni, and the uni has a Z Corp 3D printer. It is mind-blowing how it works and somewhat amazing technology. I'm not sure if anyone here will know, but I'll ask anyway.
What can you do with the resin once it's modelled? Could you actually make a cup and make tea in it, without it melting, disintegrating or poisoning somebody, or make a plate and eat off it?

Odd question I know, just want to know a bit more.


Want to enjoy fewer advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
John Doe Feb 04, 2009, 04:10pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List

Edited: Feb 04, 2009, 04:14pm EST

 
>> Re: 3D Printing
Well that all depends on what the resin is!? i would assume whoever operates or maintains the machine will know more about it and would be the best people to ask.

From what i know you take a CAD and make a real life prototype, quickly and cheaply. so in theory that should be anything u want, inc a mug! but functionality wise i dont think it would be appropriate.

Gerritt Feb 08, 2009, 03:23pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List  
>> Re: 3D Printing
I don't know the direct answer, but for the most part these 3D printers are for prototyping only and not for finished products.
After looking at the materials site for ZCORP http://www.zcorp.com/Products/3D-Printers/Material-Options/spage.aspx It does appear that you may be able to use the zp140 material as a safe, non-toxic compound. However, I would check with them via the "Have a question?" link off of the same page before I started drinking coffee out of it.
Interestingly, ther are casting compounds that may stand up to the heat of coffee, if properly glazed and sealed, but I'd still check with them.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO

Write a Reply >>


 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.