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  Best Online backup service for 80 GB? 
 
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binar Sep 24, 2009, 06:40pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Fellow Forum Members,
I have 80 gigabytes of a 250 gigabyte hard drive occupied with my personal data and various app installations. I want to backup the entire hard drive online so that if my hard drive fails, all I have to do is restore my online backup onto a new blank 250 gigabyte hard drive.

Is there any online backup service that can accomplish such a task? I have looked at Moby and they only backup data. I would like an online backup service that backs up data and software installations, and also performs automatic syncs so that my online backup copy is a mirror image of my PC hard drive.

Any info willl be greatly appreciated. Thanks.


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john albrich Sep 25, 2009, 09:15pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 29, 2016, 07:41am EST

 
>> Couple of warnings-"Cloud" Storage/Use
I'm generally uncomfortable with 2nd party on-line backup services, especially when one plans to backup storage that contains personal data. Basically, one should consider balancing convenience v. the possible data security concerns.

There are a few things to consider:

1) When you use a second party business to store your data, law enforcement no longer requires a full-blown search warrant to access your data. They can use a device called a National Security Letter or NSL. They are much easier to use than a standard warrant and require far lower criteria to be approved (and usually after the fact). That gives them full access to your data stored on that business' systems. In addition, the company is usually ordered to not tell you that such a search was performed, so you will never know if your data have been compromised, and that could also include medical info, legal info, tax info, etc.

2) Some states have laws that require companies and individuals that even SUSPECT there may be illegal content on someone's media, to report that suspicion to law enforcement. That can trigger an NSL or even a search warrant....even when they're wrong...as has occurred multiple times. People have had their children taken by protective services based on pictures stored on their hard drives when they took their computers in for service...pictures so horrible they deserve having their lives ruined (pics of their children playing in swimsuits or babies bathing in the tub). There is very little to prevent an employee you p**s-off from making a false report as all he has to say is he made the report in good faith. NSLs have also seen increasing abuse over the past years. The authority level at which an NSL can be created has decreased as well, which can put that decision in the hands of many more people, who may have less training, and may be more inclined to abuse their authority.

3) Some companies might sift through your data and sell information to advertisers or marketing firms. ISPs are increasingly doing this (freedom to read your email content and browser history, etc. is in terms of service. But, some ISPs specifically declare they will NOT do this.) There is no reason to believe some data retention facilities wouldn't be tempted to do the same. And, remember, you may be using their software to perform the entire process, including encryption so encryption may not keep your data secure.

G. G. Sep 25, 2009, 09:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Best Online backup service for 80 GB?
binar,


Hey.... check Carbonite out ... I think this is what you may be looking for - http://www.carbonite.com/

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john albrich Sep 26, 2009, 02:25am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Sep 26, 2009, 02:36am EDT

 
>> Re: Best Online backup service for 80 GB?
G. G. said:
Hey.... check Carbonite out....

Cause it worked so well for Han Solo. (someone had to say it)

Here's some info on a handful of "free" sites (usu with options to get more storage)
http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/best-free-online-backup-sites.htm



Meats_Of_Evil Sep 26, 2009, 07:14pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Best Online backup service for 80 GB?
Oh no you didn't!

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Everything I write is Sarcasm.
binar Sep 27, 2009, 12:50pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Best Online backup service for 80 GB?
John,
Thanks a lot for your eye-opening post. What you say is something that honestly was not even in my radar. I definitely need to think twice about using an online backup service. I think the only real smart option is to buy a backup hard drive and keep it at a friends house hooked up to the internet. This way it can be synced while residing in a remote location just incase if my house burns down, my data will be safe. Again, thanks for the post and thanks to everyone else who also posted.



john albrich said:
I'm generally uncomfortable with 2nd party on-line backup services, especially when one plans to backup storage that contains personal data. Basically, one should consider balancing convenience v. the possible data security concerns.

There are a few things to consider:

1) When you use a second party business to store your data, law enforcement no longer requires a full-blown search warrant to access your data. They can use a device called a National Security Letter or NSL. They are much easier to use than a standard warrant and require far lower criteria to be approved (and usually after the fact). That gives them full access to your data stored on that business' systems. In addition, the company is usually ordered to not tell you that such a search was performed, so you will never know if your data have been compromised, and that could also include medical info, legal info, tax info, etc.

2) Some states have laws that require companies and individuals that even SUSPECT there may be illegal content on someone's media, to report that suspicion to law enforcement. That can trigger an NSL or even a search warrant....even when they're wrong...as has occurred multiple times. People have had their children taken by protective services based on pictures stored on their hard drives when they took their computers in for service...pictures so horrible they deserve having their lives ruined (pics of their children playing in swimsuits or babies bathing in the tub). There is very little to prevent an employee you p**s-off from making a false report as all he has to say is he made the report in good faith. NSLs have also seen increasing abuse over the past years. The authority level at which an NSL can be created has decreased as well, which can put that decision in the hands of many more people, who may have less training, and may be more inclined to abuse their authority.

3) Some companies might sift through your data and sell information to advertisers or marketing firms. ISPs are increasingly doing this (freedom to read your email content and browser history, etc. is in terms of service. But, some ISPs specifically declare they will NOT do this.) There is no reason to believe some data retention facilities wouldn't be tempted to do the same. And, remember, you may be using their software to perform the entire process, including encryption so encryption may not keep your data secure.


john albrich Jan 29, 2016, 07:44am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 29, 2016, 07:51am EST

 
>> "Cloud" email-No Warrant Needed
More info for those of you who use "Cloud" storage, online backup, or know your ISP caches email content for X years, etc.

Sen. Mike Lee, R-Utah, is leading the charge to pass legislation to make it harder for the government to see your emails. Lee is championing S. 356, also known as the Electronic Communications Privacy Amendments Act, which would require officials to get a warrant or court order to gain access to emails just as they currently do to search Americans’ mail or enter their homes.

He said there are no restrictions on the government searching emails. “Nothing. All the government has to do is have is the thought, ‘I want to go after so-and-so’s email.’ They don’t have to go get a court order. They don’t have to get a warrant. They just have to decide they want it. As long as the email is at least 180 days old, they can get it (without any warrant or even an NSL),” Lee explained.

http://www.wnd.com/2016/01/senator-moves-to-block-feds-reading...ns-emails/


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