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  Processor TDP: What does it mean? 
 
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Nathan Daniels Feb 23, 2010, 10:25am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Does the TDP (Thermal Design Power) of a processor determine its max thermal output or does it indicate the maximum heat a processor can handle? In other words, will a processor running at 2.0 GHz with a TDP of 25W operate cooler than a processor running at 1.86 Ghz with a TDP of 35W?


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Plug & Play Feb 23, 2010, 10:47am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?

Yeah..Or would like to believe without google...its is the power the chip outputs....i.e the energy cost. Its not the heat it generates...I hope. Its the power it uses...AFAIK.

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John Doe Feb 23, 2010, 10:48am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 23, 2010, 10:50am EST

 
>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
Im not an expert so im probably wrong, but i was under the impression that the TDP rating determined how much power it takes to keep the processor cool (but not the power needed to run the actual processor just to cool it). So which processor runs cooler would depend on the definition of cool. But one takes 25w to keep cool, and the other 35w to keep cool.

Am i way off here?


Plug & Play Feb 23, 2010, 01:32pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?

SORTED...

The thermal design power (TDP), sometimes called thermal design point, represents the maximum amount of power the cooling system in a computer is required to dissipate. For example, a laptop's CPU cooling system may be designed for a 20 watt TDP, which means that it can dissipate up to 20 watts of heat without exceeding the maximum junction temperature for the computer chip. It can do this using an active cooling method such as a fan or any of the three passive cooling methods, convection, thermal radiation or conduction. Typically, a combination of methods are used. The TDP is typically not the most power the chip could ever draw, such as by a power virus, but rather the maximum power that it would draw when running real applications. This ensures the computer will be able to handle essentially all applications without exceeding its thermal envelope, or requiring a cooling system for the maximum theoretical power, which would cost more and achieve no benefit.

In some cases the TDP has been under-estimated and that in real applications (typically strenuous, such as video encoding or games) the CPU has exceeded the TDP. In this case, the CPU will either cause a system failure (a "therm-trip") or throttle its speed down.[1]. Most modern CPUs will only cause a therm-trip on a catastrophic cooling failure such as a stuck fan or a loose heatsink.

Since safety margins and the definition of what constitutes a real application vary between manufacturers, TDP values between different manufacturers cannot be accurately compared. While a processor with a TDP of 100 W will almost certainly use more power at full load than a processor with a 10 W TDP, it may or may not use more power than a processor from a different manufacturer that has a 90 W TDP. Additionally, TDPs are often specified for families of processors, with the low-end models usually using significantly less power than those at the high end of the family.

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<a class= Feb 23, 2010, 01:46pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
^ Wikipedia ftw.

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Nathan Daniels Feb 23, 2010, 02:08pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
I obviously went to Wikipedia before asking on HWA but I was still confused. If the cooling system needs to dissipate 35W for one processor but only 25 for another, doesn't it make sense that the former runs hotter than the latter?

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<a class= Feb 23, 2010, 02:22pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
The way I understand it is "More peak Wattage = More heat"

So the cooling system from a 60 TDP P4 won't cool down a 140W TDP Core i9 or whatever...

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Plug & Play Feb 23, 2010, 03:56pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?

Yes....it does make sense that the former runs hotter then the latter. But what if the former CPU is a Quad core and the latter is only a Dual core?

Its a stupid way of saying which chip runs hotter...therefore as I stumbled on earlier produces more heat and more energy.

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Dublin_Gunner Feb 26, 2010, 06:40am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
TDP - the envelope within a processor of certain spec is designed to run within. This determines clock speeds, required stock cooling, voltage etc.


i.e AMD may have a spec to release a high end quad core processor. Given the cooling they can ship with the processor, they may bin high end parts at 140W TDP.

This may be a 3.4Ghz Quad Core.

The lower the TDP of a particular processor design, technically, the higher it can be clocked, and therefore the faster the CPU can be.


They may only have 10% of Dies from a wafer that can adhere to a particularly tight TDP - hence the price for these parts goes up, as there are less of them.

The reason why you'll see low TDP (energy efficient) CPU's with a higher price tag.

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andrew kairis Dec 04, 2013, 07:09am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Dec 04, 2013, 07:13am EST

 
>> Re: Processor TDP: What does it mean?
My question would be all haswells are essentially the same within family (i3, i5 i7 etc)

how do they make lower wattage ones?
I can't see how it would be unless it meant it just throttles sooner than the higher heat output parts.

you have the 4570 running at over 3ghz rated for 84watts (or 77 cant remember)
the you have the 4570s running at 2.9ghz and rated for 65watts. Some people say the lower clock means less heat..... yeah ok but they have the same turbo speed of 3.6ghz... and I would imagine when the cpu kicks to turbo would be A when its taxed the most and B when it would make the most heat (due to reason A and due to being higher clocked)

so doesn't that throw out the base clock lower= lower heat --- reasoning?

cousre maybe Dublin is right... but the pricing is only slightly different for those two



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