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  I think you mean "logarithmic" 
 
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Mike Pedersen Feb 24, 2010, 02:18am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 24, 2010, 02:21am EST

Replies: 3 - Views: 1518
As what you described was a logarithmic curve, rather than exponential.



Unrelated: I have a Q9550 (2830MHz) with a stock VCC of 1.215V. However, I am able to undervolt to 1.112V AND overclock to 3570MHz and still pass my testing regimen (5 pass IBT, 20 pass Linx, 12hr Prime95 SmallFFTs, 12hr Prime95 Blend).

Obviously Intel doesn't use higher clock speeds for reason of heat, but if my CPU is stable at stock speeds on less than 1.00V then why do they ship it with a VCC as high as 1.215V? That would even increase heat, right?


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Dublin_Gunner Feb 24, 2010, 06:39am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: I think you mean "logarithmic"
Mike Pedersen said:

Obviously Intel doesn't use higher clock speeds for reason of heat, but if my CPU is stable at stock speeds on less than 1.00V then why do they ship it with a VCC as high as 1.215V? That would even increase heat, right?


Not all CPU's are created equally.

Intel would have specs they want to adhere to for each CPU model. Some will adhere to it perfectly, some will fail to function at those specs / temps.

Some however, will perform well above those specs - just as you've seen from your CPU.

Count yourself lucky :)



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riki taylor Aug 15, 2010, 07:17am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Serve Technology

Plainly Intel doesn't use higher time speeds for ground of energy, but if my CPU is unchanging at gillyflower speeds on fewer than 1.00V then why do they ship it with a VCC as altitudinous as 1.215V? That would straight increment change, starboard?

riki taylor
<a href="http://servetechnology.com">Serve Technology</a>

riki taylor Aug 15, 2010, 07:21am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: I think you mean "logarithmic"

Manifestly Intel doesn't use higher clock speeds for think of emotionality, but if my CPU is firm at security speeds on inferior than 1.00V then why do they ship it with a VCC as postgraduate as 1.215V? That would symmetrical growth emotionalism, justice?
riki taylor
[url=http://www.servetechnology.com]Serve Technology[/url]


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