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PIRATE Feb 24, 2010, 11:07pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 24, 2010, 11:07pm EST

Replies: 22 - Views: 3545

I got it, I love it, traded XP for it until I get my new comp running and Win7 gets updates.


What an amazing piece of free software. :D


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Intel Core 2 6400 2.1ghz / ASUS SLI Deluxe / 4gb DDR2 800 G.Skill / ATi Radeon HD 3870 512mb OC / 7 years old Seagate Barracuda 160gb 7200
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kOrny Feb 24, 2010, 11:16pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Dude I know. I was saying the same thing yesterday. I put it on my netbook n it rox!

PIRATE Feb 24, 2010, 11:19pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10


Freaking great, I just plugged in my Netgear WG111v2 adapter, and bam! Wireless networks available... :cool:

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Intel Core 2 6400 2.1ghz / ASUS SLI Deluxe / 4gb DDR2 800 G.Skill / ATi Radeon HD 3870 512mb OC / 7 years old Seagate Barracuda 160gb 7200
john albrich Feb 25, 2010, 01:28am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 25, 2010, 02:18am EST

 
>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10

Approx how much disk space does the latest version take?

Also, anyone want to verify or share their HASH?
Mine were:

64bit ubuntu-9.10-desktop-amd64.iso
MD5=dc51c1d7e3e173dcab4e0b9ad2be2bbf
SHA1=56c7265192c857963f305cd5edaef5af536d3c92

32bit ubuntu-9.10-desktop-i386.iso
MD5=8790491bfa9d00f283ed9dd2d77b3906
SHA1=2816a96de299631e545d1c068837d05c64157e49

kOrny Feb 25, 2010, 01:58am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
I've got about 700MB left from my ~3.7GB netbook hard drive. Thats with a bunch of programs installed too (internet, email, chat, office, etc).

Feb 25, 2010, 02:26am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 25, 2010, 02:36am EST

 
>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
John, your MD5's match the official hashes, you're good to go:
http://mirrors.us.kernel.org/ubuntu-releases/9.10/MD5SUMS

I don't know if you guys are using Linux because you're into it, or if you just need a quick free OS, but if the former, I highly recommend Arch Linux. I've only been using it since I left Windows, but it's incredible (if you're into that sort of thing): it doesn't pretend to know what software you like (it doesn't come with GNOME/KDE or even X11). Arch just gives you a base install to which you install only what YOU want from the repos. <3

There's so many gamers here that Windows is by far the HWA OS-of-choice, which is fine, but I wish there were some more Linux nerds here. :cool:

Dublin_Gunner Feb 25, 2010, 05:05am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
McFly said:
John, your MD5's match the official hashes, you're good to go:
http://mirrors.us.kernel.org/ubuntu-releases/9.10/MD5SUMS

I don't know if you guys are using Linux because you're into it, or if you just need a quick free OS, but if the former, I highly recommend Arch Linux. I've only been using it since I left Windows, but it's incredible (if you're into that sort of thing): it doesn't pretend to know what software you like (it doesn't come with GNOME/KDE or even X11). Arch just gives you a base install to which you install only what YOU want from the repos. <3

There's so many gamers here that Windows is by far the HWA OS-of-choice, which is fine, but I wish there were some more Linux nerds here. :cool:


Its probably the command line that pushes most people away from Linux TBH.

While Linux has really come on in recent years on the GUI side, as well as application / developer support, the need to know many command line inputs to do stuff that takes a click on other OS' puts people off me thinks.

I might check out this new Ubuntu though, seems like a good step forward.

Lancool PC K62
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Feb 25, 2010, 05:32am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 25, 2010, 05:35am EST

 
>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Dublin_Gunner (64526) said on Feb 25, 2010 at 02:05am PST:
Its probably the command line that pushes most people away from Linux TBH.

The command line is a huge advantage in my eyes! Sure, a good GUI can do a lot of things in a few clicks, but a good CLI can automate and script repetitive tasks in ways that a GUI can't. Most of the time, I can get system tasks done a lot quicker from the command line.

That's not to say I live in a command line -- I like a the combination of a good GUI and and good CLI, and Linux fits the bill here perfectly for my taste. The same argument could be made easily for Apple OS X, which I think uses bash by default (or maybe it's tcsh). But Apple's "everything Apple" business model doesn't fit my taste, so ...

If you want to script in Windows, better dust off your old MS-DOS books for some good-ol' fashioned batch files. I used them a lot in my DOS days so I'm pretty handy with 'em, but they're nothing impressive. PowerShell, on the other hand, is a big step up, and I think one of Microsoft's best moves with Windows 7 was to include PowerShell 2.0, so people can share scripts without having to worry about whether or not somebody had bothered to download and install PowerShell (assuming they're running Windows 7, which of course they should be!).

^_^

kOrny Feb 25, 2010, 12:39pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
yea u both are right. the reason i was scared of linux was mainly because of the command line, but so far i havent needed to use it at all.

though, it does have its advantages if you know how to use it. my friend was showing me a few commands that would line up a bunch of software to be downloaded and installed - no clicking or navigating.

the best thing i like about ubuntu is that i did not have to install any drivers what so ever. first boot it recognized EVERYTHING!

ill give arch linux a try one of these days McFly. looks pretty neat.

PIRATE Feb 25, 2010, 12:45pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Im having trouble updating my 8400 GS drivers to the latest.

With the drivers that I get from linux itself everything looks great but the graphics are kind of laggy at times.

Could someone link me to a tutorial on how to install the Nvidia drivers?

I downloaded them from nvidia but the pacakge has .run at the end and I can't figure out how to run it lol.

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Intel Core 2 6400 2.1ghz / ASUS SLI Deluxe / 4gb DDR2 800 G.Skill / ATi Radeon HD 3870 512mb OC / 7 years old Seagate Barracuda 160gb 7200
Feb 25, 2010, 01:23pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
k0rny (69223) said on Feb 25, 2010 at 09:39am PST:
though, it does have its advantages if you know how to use it. my friend was showing me a few commands that would line up a bunch of software to be downloaded and installed - no clicking or navigating.

I certainly can respect that -- you want to have a powerful CLI, but you don't want to have to use it to get simple tasks done.

As for installing software from the command line, that's the only way I do it. :) If your friend was running Debian or Ubuntu, the command was something like this (it might be mozilla-firefox and not firefox, I forget):
sudo apt-get install firefox

sudo gives you temporary root privileges (to install software, in the case). apt is the package manager: apt-get is a front-end for it. The command above will download the latest version of Firefox from the Debian/Ubuntu repository online, and install it for you. Wham, bam, thank you ma'am.

Synaptic is a great GUI front-end for this in Debian/Ubuntu, but I've always found the CLI to be a lot easier for installing software.

Later on, you can you use a similar command to upgrade ALL of the packages that you've downloaded from the repositories, all at the same time. Beats the HELL out of looking for new versions of programs and then downloading a bunch of setup installers for new program versions from a bunch of different websites.

Most Linux distributions have good package managers: in Arch Linux, the command to install Firefox would be:
sudo pacman -Sy firefox

k0rny (69223) said on Feb 25, 2010 at 09:39am PST:
ill give arch linux a try one of these days McFly. looks pretty neat.

If you want to use Arch, you're going to have to get comfortable with the command line. Arch's big thing is simplicity and user-choice: when you install it, you get nothing installed BUT a command line, simple system tools, and the tools you need to install software from the online repos. You choose what you want to install, and install it. It makes it VERY customizable. Your OS can be as big or as small as you want it to be.

If that sounds interesting to you, I'd read through the ArchWiki, it's very well done and full of information.

P!RATE (91128) said on Feb 25, 2010 at 09:45am PST:
I downloaded them from nvidia but the pacakge has .run at the end and I can't figure out how to run it lol.

You have to give it permissions to be executable, from the terminal:
chmod +x filename.run

And then to run it:
./filename.run

Once you're comfortable with the command line, those kinds of things are just second nature, you won't even think about it.

Sean Costello Feb 25, 2010, 01:23pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
The only time i've really only used Linux is as a backup for when Windows takes as**t and need to backup files before an install. Live CDs ftmfw!

______
Story of My Life- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c764JWVt5Fw
Nathan Daniels Feb 25, 2010, 01:32pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Sean Costello said:
The only time i've really only used Linux is as a backup for when Windows takes as**t and need to backup files before an install. Live CDs ftmfw!


Ditto

I have CLI-phobia. I require colors and the ability to use a mouse!

--------
"The more we sweat in peace, the less we bleed in war."
-Patton
PIRATE Feb 25, 2010, 02:20pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10


Well, got driver set up, WoW and Steam running great on Wine... So pretty much set.

Gah I love this. I'm gonna install Arch at one of the test systems at work to get familiar with it, and if I have problems with it, I'll just ask McFly for help.


Thanks all for the opinions.

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Intel Core 2 6400 2.1ghz / ASUS SLI Deluxe / 4gb DDR2 800 G.Skill / ATi Radeon HD 3870 512mb OC / 7 years old Seagate Barracuda 160gb 7200
kOrny Feb 25, 2010, 02:38pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 25, 2010, 02:38pm EST

 
>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
McFly said:
As for installing software from the command line, that's the only way I do it. If your friend was running Debian or Ubuntu, the command was something like this (it might be mozilla-firefox and not firefox, I forget):
sudo apt-get install firefox

Yup. Exactly.

Damn I've been on my netbook all morning. No need to turn on the PC.

This is truly great, more people need to know about linux.

PIRATE Feb 26, 2010, 09:25pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10


I am giving Kubuntu 9.10 a try so I'll get back when I set it up tomorrow.

I wanna see what all this talk of KDE is.

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Intel Core 2 6400 2.1ghz / ASUS SLI Deluxe / 4gb DDR2 800 G.Skill / ATi Radeon HD 3870 512mb OC / 7 years old Seagate Barracuda 160gb 7200
Sean Costello Feb 26, 2010, 11:37pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
the only reason i tried Kubuntu over Ubuntu is because i thought Konquerer sounded badass for a browser lol

______
Story of My Life- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c764JWVt5Fw
Feb 27, 2010, 01:49am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Kubuntu is just Ubuntu with KDE pre-installed instead of GNOME. Seems silly to download and install (or even distribute) an OS with a different name for such a change ...

You can install KDE from Ubuntu just fine, from the repositories. Then you can start X with whichever one you want. I don't like KDE or the Qt toolkit at all, though.

Dr. Peaceful Feb 27, 2010, 02:32am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Red Hat comes with both KDE and Gnome. It's an option during the OS installation (you can only choose one I believe). I like Gnome much better. I like the old Lilo loader better than the later Grub, too.

I used to play around with Linux a lot back in school years. Still have a PIII full of Linux OS's. Some of the programming projects I did are still there, frozen in time. ;) Not sure how much changes since then for the newer Linux distros. Guess it's time for me to try Linux again!

Feb 28, 2010, 04:12am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 28, 2010, 04:16am EST

 
>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
Doc, if you're already an experienced Linux man, I'd suggest skipping Ubuntu and going for one of what I consider to be the best three for workstation use: Arch, Gentoo, or Slackware. CentOS for servers, but for servers I'd be more likely to use FreeBSD.

I like that Slackware patches next-to-nothing with "Slackware-specific" patches, but the default package tools don't handle dependencies, so you have to hunt them down yourself. The Slackware die-hards consider that a plus: they get more control over the system, which I generally agree is a good thing, but in this case I consider it a huge pain in the ass, and mostly unnecessary, since those programs aren't going to run without their dependencies! (and even with dep-checking, it can be overrided to achieve the safe thing)

I like that with Gentoo, you can patch anything on the system before the OS even gets installed, but again ... compiling everything, all of the time ... another huge pain in the ass.

I agree with you on LILO, too. Simple, elegant, and simple again. Unfortunately, almost all distro's install GRUB out-of-the-box now, so you have to install LILO yourself.

pickboy87 Mar 21, 2010, 09:46pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Ubuntu 9.10
McFly said:
John, your MD5's match the official hashes, you're good to go:
http://mirrors.us.kernel.org/ubuntu-releases/9.10/MD5SUMS

I don't know if you guys are using Linux because you're into it, or if you just need a quick free OS, but if the former, I highly recommend Arch Linux. I've only been using it since I left Windows, but it's incredible (if you're into that sort of thing): it doesn't pretend to know what software you like (it doesn't come with GNOME/KDE or even X11). Arch just gives you a base install to which you install only what YOU want from the repos. <3

There's so many gamers here that Windows is by far the HWA OS-of-choice, which is fine, but I wish there were some more Linux nerds here. :cool:

I personally wouldn't recommend Arch to a new comer to Linux. It's definitely worth the effort once someone feels comfortable in Linux, but by no means a newbie friendly distro.

I've distro hopped quite a bit and I ended up sticking with Arch. I would suggest anyone who is interested in it (and has a few days or a spare machine) to dink around with it. I would HIGHLY suggest reading/studying the Beginners Guide in the wiki section of archlinux.org. Without it, I would have been completely lost.

Easiest desktop environment to start out in for me was KDE. I tried a basic gnome install on Arch and felt fairly lost. Eventually transitioned to openbox, but it took a bit of learning before I felt comfortable enough with Arch.

Anyways, enough rambling. Enjoy whichever distro you fall in love with. I simply got away from Ubuntu because it felt too much like Windows in a way, and I got sick of reformatting my harddrive every 6 months only to not have a working system for a month while they ironed out the new bugs.

________________________________________
'Yes, firefox is indeed greater than women. Can women block pop ups for you? No. Can Firefox show you naked women? Yes.'
*Specs in personal bio*

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