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john nguyen May 30, 2010, 02:45am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I've had my computer rig for about 3 years now, but over the past 6 months, i've had to send in my ram (OCZ ddr2 pc6400) multiple times because it would fail. The time span in which i would receive a new stick then have it start failing would be 1-2 months and its annoying me! What could be causing my ram to fail so often?

Could it just be that it's poor quality ram or could it be my motherboard that messing my RAM up?


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Shawn Langley May 30, 2010, 08:26am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: multiple ram failures
Happening to multiple sticks fail should exclude poor ram... its also branded further enforcing that.

I would definitely be looking at the motherboard or environmental conditions (ie heat)
Do you overclock at all? it might be worth seeing what the ram is running at voltage wise with something like Everest even .1 of a volt too high could be causing issues.

Also what type of PSU are you using make & model?

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thomp son44 Aug 30, 2010, 01:53pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Aug 30, 2010, 01:53pm EDT

 
>> Re: multiple ram failures
I have 50 new machines, 45 of them are fine but 6 of them have had RAM
failure, There are 2 things that I can see could affect them:
- They are all in the same location under a window. (although it is dry,
environmental monitor in BIOS indicate OK temperatures etc, and the windows
are always closed)
- They are all on a new mains spur.
The machines were setup from a random pile of boxes so there is no
sequential logic to the failures and the building of the machines.
Is there any thing I can test, any other ideas?
thompson44
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bossa ritchie Aug 30, 2010, 02:34pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: multiple ram failures
Had a problem with RAM a while back and it was just the Voltage was a bit high in the BIOS, the RAM should have the Voltage written on it maybe even undeclock it at start.

50 Machines and some have bad RAM, I'm taking it they are Brand Names likes Dell or HP, to be honest the only real thing you can do at the start is get onto Tech Support and get the RAM replaced, after they have been replaced check them out to make sure they are fine, then wait and see if it happens again.

You could check over the systems but if they are a brand name they will come with the proper settings in BIOS etc etc, I would see no real point in trying to figure out what went wrong when it may just be you have got a few bad systems delivered.

john nguyen Oct 31, 2010, 07:25pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: multiple ram failures
My PSU is a Thermaltake 430W.
I do not overclock and usually try to keep my computer cool, however , i keep my computer running 24/7.

Another ram stick failed again last week after I had sent it in 5 months ago for a new one.. so the culprit has to be the motherboard and the weird thing is its always been the RAM in the first slot that keeps on getting messed up

Jon Bailey Nov 01, 2010, 07:18am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: multiple ram failures
I would suggest that there is a short occuring in that RAM socket, have you inspected the socket for foreign objects?

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john albrich Nov 01, 2010, 06:52pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 01, 2010, 07:03pm EDT

 
>> Re: multiple ram failures

The memory voltage regulator could also be providing slightly high constant voltage, or it could be unstable and sending out spikes/surges every now and then.

That regulation failure could be aggravated by what else is electrically loading the motherboard, what apps are running, etc. at any given time, so you could see varying times to failure as you change your system usage and/or configuration. It could also be aggravated by a system PSU providing unstable voltage on a given power rail, as the memory voltage regulator may have difficulty responding properly to a quickly varying input voltage.

If possible on your mobo, you might try setting the RAM voltage down a tick. See if it still runs ok, and then lower it again until you start getting memtest or boot RAMtest failures (use the "long" BIOS Settings RAMtest option)...then raise the voltage a tick or two again (as long as the final voltage stays UNDER the current/default setting). This would help if it's a simple regulation failure, but might not help if it's a voltage quality failure (spikes/surges).

john albrich Nov 01, 2010, 07:11pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 01, 2010, 07:12pm EDT

 
>> Re: multiple ram failures
john nguyen said:
...the weird thing is its always been the RAM in the first slot that keeps on getting messed up


Another possibility is latent ESD damage due to the way you handle the memory stick and other circuitry all the way from the time you open the package to final installation and during diagnostics and anytime the case panels are open. While this is not as likely as a hardware problem given what you've described...it is a possibility and can't be ruled out 100%. So, for completeness I'm listing it.

Of course, if you've been handling all the memory sticks the same way, conducting tests where you remove/install the other memory sticks as well (e.g. for diagnostics), the probability (that latent ESD damage is responsible) decreases even more. But the simple observation is that you seem to have been handling the memory stick in that position more often and is thus part of the situation to keep in mind.


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