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  My psu passes paper clip test... but now what? 
 
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daniel nguyen Jul 11, 2010, 10:34pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I'm sure everyone has seen a thread like this here saying, "my computer was working last night but when I try turning it on the next day.. it doesn't" Well I am in the same situation. My computer does not turn on but eliminated the possibilities of what could be wrong by trying to turn on my pc with another psu. It does turn on which makes me think my psu is the main problem. When it's hooked in and plugged in, it shines a light green on the indicator. I researched and saw a paperclip test and did it. When I had the paper clip in it had the indcator bright green and the fan was spinning. So my psu isn't dead like I thought. How come my psu is running with that test but not powering on my computer?

Details:
I have a HIPRO 300 volt psu.
Dell Desktop from 2008


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G. G. Jul 11, 2010, 10:52pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
it could be the switch in the computer case. The way the computer switch works to turn on your computer is that when you press the switch, the switch makes a momentary contact and this momentary contact shorts out causing the mother board to tell the psu to turn on fully. The switch is not a on or off type.... it is a momentary contact switch..

you can trace down the other end of the wire that goes to the motherboard... two wire to a header... you can do the same thing as the switch is by removing the wire..... and momentary short those two pins (touch and let go)...it should start up the psu and then your system.


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daniel nguyen Jul 11, 2010, 11:22pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
do i do it with the paper clip? the button leads a wire to a 7 pin thing. how would i situation the paper clip to have it turn on. also though, the power button works fine with my other psu.

G. G. Jul 11, 2010, 11:39pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
You indicated that you had another psu.... install that psu into your computer and see if it works... i.e powering up your system. If that works, reinstall your original psu to see if it works or still have the same issue... If it fails... then it is your psu... even though it may power up via a paper clip outside your system... doesnt mean that it is ok.. one of the other power lines may be a fault causing your system to not come on.


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daniel nguyen Jul 11, 2010, 11:57pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
Yea it's my psu..
Before looking to purchase a new one, is there something I can do internally? a possible fix?

Dr. Peaceful Jul 12, 2010, 04:57am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
G.G.'s right.

The "paper clip test" you mentioned is to short 2 pins (24pins connector = pin 16 & 17; 20pins connector = pin 14 & 15; ATX PSU pinouts: http://www.smpspowersupply.com/connector_atx_pinout.GIF ) to turn on the PSU without going through a motherboard.

When the PSU is connected to the mobo, these two pins will travel through the mobo to the power switch leads. Like G.G. said, one possibility is that the case power switch leads are not connected correctly (or faulty). That's simple to diagnose by shorting the 2 power switch pins on the mobo yourself, with say, a paper clip. (standard Intel fpanel pinout: http://www.intel.com/support/motherboards/desktop/wizards/nobo...fpanel.jpg )

But, that's not all. In order for the mobo to turn on, it also needs a Power_Ok (pin 8, both 20pins and 24pins connectors) signal from the PSU. A decent PSU will self diagnose itself when turn on, then send Power_Ok signal, telling the mobo that the voltage is correct and stable. So even though your PSU is able to turn on by itself, it's not able to deliver a correct and stable voltage. Therefore, it's not going to power the mobo up.

I am not familiar in repairing the internals of a PSU. You will need some expert electrician suggestions. One advice I can give is be careful! Since some of capacitors may still contain fatal amount of energy, even when power is off.

G. G. Jul 12, 2010, 09:12am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jul 12, 2010, 09:37am EDT

 
>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
Dr. Peaceful said:
G.G.'s right.

The "paper clip test" you mentioned is to short 2 pins (24pins connector = pin 16 & 17; 20pins connector = pin 14 & 15; ATX PSU pinouts: http://www.smpspowersupply.com/connector_atx_pinout.GIF ) to turn on the PSU without going through a motherboard.


basically you short out the green wire (turn on) and black wire (ground) This will power on the psu if it is able to but even if it powers up, doesnt mean the psu is good since any one of the voltage source might read the correct/borderline required voltage "unloaded", but once it is introduce a load, it goes belly up.




daniel nguyen said:
Yea it's my psu..
Before looking to purchase a new one, is there something I can do internally? a possible fix?



realisticly..... NO

even if you or someone else were able to find the component that is questionable, it is not to say there could be another component that would be border line that could make the psu "iffy" in the future where the next time it goes could take out other components along with it, i.e. video card, mb, drives.......


The safe position is to buy a reliable branded psu.


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Socratesx Jan 05, 2011, 10:42am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: My psu passes paper clip test... but now what?
If you are going to buy a new PSU be sure to be from a decent manufacturer like corsair or seasonic. You may find them expensive but the PSU is the most important part.

http://www.buy-a-new-computer.com

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