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  Help- my computer won't turn on 
 
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Tony Pearson Oct 07, 2010, 09:33pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Hi everybody,
I'm not a computer expert and i need help. Whilst i was changing the computer screens i removed the power plug point attached to the tower, and then the computer turned off, now it won't turn on.

the problem is my computer screen (which is powered from the tower) has its light on, but the computer won't turn on and it won't make a noise. even the mouse which has a light doesn't turn on, or the lights on the keyboard. only the screen has its light on.

please help.


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micro Oct 07, 2010, 09:38pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
There is a switch on the back of the psu(power supply) that may have been flipped. (a rocker switch)

The power cable may need to be removed and plugged back in.

if it was pulled out forcefully it may be a bad power cord. try switching cords from the monitor to the pc.

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Tony Pearson Oct 07, 2010, 09:42pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Thanks for the quick reply.
I couldn't find a rocket switch (any power switch) at the back of the tower.

I've tried using a different power cord too, and it makes no difference.

john albrich Oct 07, 2010, 10:13pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 07, 2010, 10:15pm EDT

 
>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on

1) Was the computer running when you unplugged it?

2) You say it doesn't turn on. Does it do ANYTHING when you first push the power button? Front power light blinks for a moment, noises, fans spinning for a second, etc.?
Just to clarify...I did read your post thoroughly, but I simply wasn't sure whether or not you were referring to things STAYING on, continuing to make noises, etc.


edit: clarification

Tony Pearson Oct 07, 2010, 10:16pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
(1) yes. but i thought i could unplug the monitor cord without damaging the computer.

(2) the computer doesn't make a sound, nothing works, no lights, fan doesn't start- nothing happens when i turn it on. but the monitor connected to the tower turns on and says "no signal", so the tower must be receiving power.

Winfield Fricke Oct 07, 2010, 11:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
I just turned my good working computer off then went to turn it back on but now i get no power what-so÷ever. why could fhis be? someone please help

john albrich Oct 08, 2010, 12:00am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Tony Pearson said:
(1) yes. but i thought i could unplug the monitor cord without damaging the computer....


I originally thought you meant you unplugged the power cord to the PSU...but it sounds now like you're saying you unplugged the display signal cable...not the system's power cable.

The display signal cable is the one that goes from the computer to the display.

The system power cable goes from the computer to AC mains or to a UPS/surge-arrestor/extension cord that then plugs into AC mains.


If the problem started when you unplugged the display from the computer, one possibility is you caused the display adapter card (inside the computer) to become physically mis-aligned in its socket. Mis-alignment of video cards can cause boot problems that include a blank screen and no diagnostic beeps or codes, but you usually see something briefly happen when you then try to power-up the computer. Regardless, you might try re-seating the video adapter card IF this was your situation. Follow appropriate handling and power-off procedures if you do this. Damage can occur if you don't. If your user manual doesn't cover these procedures and you decide you want to re-seat the adapter, post back for details.

Tony. Pearson Oct 08, 2010, 12:29am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
i unplugged the power cord for the display screen which is attached to the tower- the problem started when i unplugged this cord. i also unplugged the VGA thingy (blue plug) attached from the display to the tower, however nothing bad happened when i did this first.

thanks :)

john albrich Oct 08, 2010, 02:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 08, 2010, 02:34pm EDT

 
>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on

We need more details about your hardware configuration...brand and model numbers at least. I've never seen a modern configuration where the display gets its power from the desktop PC...except in really old PSUs.

But, it sounds like the first step you now need to take is to check out your AC mains power-cord(s) and PSU. If the PSU fan isn't even spinning, then it is likely not putting out any power to anything, and thus could not be responsible for changing the display to/from a "no signal" status.

Simply disconnecting the video cable from the tower (at the tower end of the cable) will result in most displays showing a "no signal" status. Some display the notice until the monitor is turned-off, other monitors display the notice only for a xx seconds then either blank the screen and go into some power-saving mode, or the monitor goes into some pseudo-screensaver mode by moving a logo or "information tag" around and about the screen.

The "information tag" could be either the "no signal" warning or it could be along the lines of "XYZ input" where XYZ is the currently selected video signal source connector (e.g. HDMI1, DVI, VGA, etc).

The ACmains to PC power cord can be tested by using it to provide power to another device (assuming it has a "universal" connector and not some bizarre unique design). However, if the display's AC power cable is connected to the PC/PSU, then we know the PSU's AC power cord is working because you said the display does turn on. However, that does not mean the PSU itself is working...all it means is that the AC power connection to the connector used by the display is working. But again, I'm making assumptions without more hardware details.

There are several different ways to do some basic PSU tests. But I'd prefer to know the hardware details before suggesting anything specific.

Tony. Pearson Oct 08, 2010, 10:52pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
The computer was purchased about 4 years ago. To be honest i'm computer illiterate, i don't know how to check the specifications of the computer. can you please tell me how?

i ordered the computer specs and some store just made the computer for me. I know it has an intel inside, and that there is something inside called a barracuda(?) 160 gigabytes. it also has a 523mb something card inside.

i got a new power cord (for the tower) and attached it to my other computer and it works perfectly. when i attached it to my broken computer nothing works- the fan doesn't even start spinning. the only thing that occurs is the display monitor turns on and says "no signal", which is odd because that implies the tower is receiving a power supply.

Tony. Pearson Oct 08, 2010, 11:12pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
I opened the computer and i saw Intel Pentium 4 and Barracuda 7200.7 160 GB (model: 8T3160021A and config: D5A-03. Does anyone know how to find the other specs?

micro Oct 09, 2010, 12:26am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 09, 2010, 12:29am EDT

 
>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Tony. Pearson said:
I opened the computer and i saw Intel Pentium 4 and Barracuda 7200.7 160 GB (model: 8T3160021A and config: D5A-03. Does anyone know how to find the other specs?


Often you can just google the model number of the machine. this is often on a sticker or somewhere on the outside of the case. Also on the front of the owners manual.(if made by Dell or another online name company).

You can also go into your device manager through windows and look at each individual component.

You are most likely at the point where you will need to try replacing parts to try to get it to work. starting with the psu (power supply)

GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3, 2600k @ 4.0
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Evga gtx 260 216, samsung 2253lw"
Baracuda 7,200.12 CoolerMaster 212 +
Win 7 64, fsp fx700-gln, Razer DA,G15
Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid
Silence in the face of evil is it's self Ev
Tony. Pearson Oct 09, 2010, 01:01am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Unfortunately i can't google the model number because i had the computer custom made. Even though its 4 years old, i've only ever used the computer 5 times- and its always worked perfectly. The computer is practically new, so im not sure if any parts need replacement.

john albrich Oct 09, 2010, 01:09am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 09, 2010, 01:55am EDT

 
>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Since you have another computer, and if you want to get your "hands dirty", you can try swapping the known working PSU from your second computer into the failing computer. That might save you from replacing a good PSU. There are instructions for removing and installing PSUs all over the internet. You can also get a basic PSU tester for about $20. They don't test everything, but they can reveal major PSU problems in a way that's safe and very easy to use. They're a good start for a beginner.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&...=0&y=0

There's something else I'd like you to do too, and you might want to do it first because it's a lot easier than removing and installing a PSU.

Does the display signal cable plug into a connector on that adapter card you found? If it does, look for ANOTHER display connector that is not on the adapter card. If you find one, that's on the system board AKA motherboard.

If there is display connector on the motherboard, then another quick check you can try is to unplug the system from AC mains, remove the display adapter card entirely from the system, and plug the display signal cable into the motherboard's display connector.
How to remove the video card
http://www.videojug.com/film/how-to-install-or-change-my-compu...phics-card
(this generally applies to both pci-x and agp cards although he specifies it's for agp video cards)
Reconnect the AC mains power cable and turn on the system and see what difference (if any) exists.

All this work inside your computer should be done where static electricity is minimal to reduce ESD (Electro-Static Discharge). e.g. don't do this on plastic surfaces, rugs, etc. in a dry environment. Ideally you would buy and use what's called an anti-static wrist strap, too. They cost under $10 and should be used every time you work on the computer.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&...=0&y=0
Without that, the work-around is to touch the system case every time before you touch anything in the computer. It's not ideal, but it's better than doing nothing to control ESD. When you remove the display adapter card, wrap it in aluminum foil. That is not the best way to store it, but it is better than nothing. I'm assuming you don't have any anti-static computer parts bags on hand.

To see what you're getting into, you might want to check out this 15min video.
http://www.maximumpc.com/article/features/video_how_build_pc_e..._explained
I found that just searching on [how to build a pc]. It's not the best but it's a decent overview. Please note that he is NOT using a wrist strap or ESD mat. That's a mistake that puts his components at risk. In addition, he also seems to be placing parts on what are called static-dissipative bags which is also a mistake. Most dissipative bags that you can see through use a chemical to reduce static build-up on the bag, and any protection quickly wears off, especially on bag exteriors. Only some of them use a conductive polymer. He should have been using an ESD mat or conductive ESD bags.


edit: added ESD info
edit: added info/price/hyperlinks for tools
edit: link to a 'how to' video for orientation to PC

Meats_Of_Evil Oct 09, 2010, 12:32pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
Don't you just love John?

Really man with your knowledge you should be getting a job in Maximum PC.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Sofia Brown Dec 29, 2010, 03:09am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Help- my computer won't turn on
If your computer seems to be receiving power after turning it on but you don't see anything on your monitor, try these troubleshooting steps.

In these situations, the power lights will stay on, you'll likely hear the fans inside your PC running, and you may or may not hear one or more beeps coming from the computer.

This situation is probably the most common in my experience working with computers that won't start. Unfortunately it's also one of the most difficult to troubleshoot.


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