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  How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi? 
 
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micro Mar 31, 2011, 03:21pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 31, 2011, 03:22pm EDT

Replies: 8 - Views: 27309
Is there any way to tell, or do you just assume that you are on N if your router and wifi card are both n/g/b?

I have a dlink dir-655 n/g/b with three antenna.
I was using a g/b wifi usb dongle. I just bought a wifi usb dongle with n/g/b.

I am only on 386k internet, so a speed test wont help.
I logged into my router, but i don't see any listing for what band i am on.

Any suggestions?
Thanks.

EDIT:
I did a quick google search, but that didn't help much, so i figured i would just ask as there are so many years of experience on our forums and someone is bound to know.


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Mr. Fook Mar 31, 2011, 03:39pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
Check your bit rates.
B = 11Mbps
G = 54Mbps to 108Mbps
N = 150 Mbps to 300Mbps

I read somewhere you can also tell from frequency from the wifi signal. 2.4Ghz for B and G, 5.0Ghz for N. But sometimes N uses 2.4Ghz, too.

micro Mar 31, 2011, 03:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
I had read via google that that is a a way to do it, but then everyone else was refuting it.

My G adapter says 54 mbps
My N says 65 mbps.

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G. G. Mar 31, 2011, 10:18pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
Mr. Fook said:
Check your bit rates.
B = 11Mbps
G = 54Mbps to 108Mbps
N = 150 Mbps to 300Mbps

I read somewhere you can also tell from frequency from the wifi signal. 2.4Ghz for B and G, 5.0Ghz for N. But sometimes N uses 2.4Ghz, too.



Micro,

Fook is correct with the possible speeds for each band.

But..... in regards to N band... The majority of N band operates on 2.4ghz. It is when you get a router that has dual band capability where you have a N band that operates on the 2.4ghz and the other N band that operates on the 5 Ghz band. Your particular router, D-Link DIR 655 is a single band (2.4ghz) for B, G, and N.

In regards to speed.... on the client side using a N adapter... just check the connection status. It will tell you the speed that it is connected at. The actual speed is another story. If you have strong connection from the client to the router and the router and client are configure correctly, you should be at 300.

Now if your N adapter is locked at 54mbps...... you need to check your incryption setting on the router. You should be running WAP2-PSK AES only. NO TKP. Using TKP will lock your speed to 54mbps.

By the way, I use to run a DIR 655 (i still have it), but now my current running router is a netgear WNDR-3700. Great router, longer range, faster speed, and dual band.



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john albrich Oct 28, 2011, 05:54pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 28, 2011, 06:15pm EDT

 
>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
.
Wouldn't there be some way to use a packet sniffer to determine which "band" is in use? Somewhere in establishing a session the systems would have to share which protocol/specification is in use, would they not? Or, is that "hidden" entirely from the computer with the adapter firmware front-end handling that part of it?...in which case you'd have to use an independent receiver to examine the raw data being sent between the adapters.

Also, I'd think that even during a given session, the adapters can switch "bands". So you could start out on "g" and then it might switch to "n", or even to "b", and so on at some future point during a session. For example, if the packet loss rate goes too high, I would ASSUME the standards allow the adapters to be smart enough to search in real-time for an alternative connection to maintain or even improve the data-rate (but that IS an assumption). It might also depend on the specific adapters...hence why some cost a LOT more money than others. It would be similar to the way cell-phones and towers negotiate phone-tower communication as signals degrade, or handing off the signal as you travel toward and away from different cell-sites. At least that's what would make sense to me were I designing the firmware/software.

Of course, it also becomes more complicated when which data rate attained is limited by the encryption protocol you select...although I'm thinking that may be more due to accommodating higher bandwidth requirements when you select to use the more complex encryption protocols. (e.g. your actual physically used total data-rate may be over 54mbps, but the effective message content data-rate may be limited to under 54mbps...and that is what they specify...with the remainder being used to support the data overhead required for encryption. For example, depending on the encryption protocols, for every character of actual message content data, you might need an additional 'x' bits that encapsulate the data for the encryption protocol. I guess this is something for me to research if no one here knows for sure.


edit to add:
BTW, the reason I'm posting here is that I'm currently in the market for a wireless router and a wireless USB dongle, and I've been reading about some fairly expensive routers and dongles having poor "n" band performance, with "g" band devices equaling and even surpassing them in data-rate (from industry reviews and buyer "feedback"). So I'm quite interested in having a tool to determine EXACTLY what a given wireless adapter is doing/using at any given point in time (because it's very detailed, one comparison/review I've been looking at is http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/802.11n-wireless-router-ac...605-9.html but that article is now a year and a half old)

john albrich Oct 28, 2011, 07:31pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
.
Re: 54Mbps restriction on "n" data-rate using certain encryption protocols

Here's a bit more on that. The way I interpret this, is that if the adapter complies with the "draft" standard, then the adapter will be restricted to 54Mbps if you use WEP/WPA-TKIP encryption protocols. But, if it complies with the non-draft version of the standard...it will not be restricted to 54Mbps and can still perform up to the full "n" data-rate supported by the adapter even if you use a WEP/WPA-TKIP protocol. I'm assuming that "or update the latest firmware" takes the adapter from complying with the "draft" to the final version of the standard.

I might be interpreting this incorrectly, but that's my take based on what was said in this adapter's "details" page.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16833166068
The IEEE 802.11n Draft prohibits using High Throughput with WEP or TKIP as the unicast cipher. If you use these encryption methods (e.g. WEP, WPA-TKIP), your data rate will drop to 54 Mbps. Rosewill recommend setting your routerís wireless encryption as WPA-AES or WPA2-AES or update the latest firmware, in order to keep your wireless transfer rate at N speed.

Colin R Dec 28, 2011, 12:51am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
Thank you! This post just resolved a lot of troubleshooting the wireless connectivity of an xbox 360 S (internal wireless) to an Actiontec V1000H modem/router.

The symptom was that the xbox would not connect via wireless and a VERY generic message, "Can't Connect to Wireless Network" was displayed on the xbox.
Encryption has always been set as TKP (perhaps the default for my ISP, Telus). With this set, the 802.11n would not connect. To resolve, logged into the Actiontec (it will be different for each device, on the Actiontec it's 192.168.1.254). Then change the encryption from TKP to AES. Note that you'll have to update other wireless devices (laptops etc) in your home with the same or they will no longer connect.

The comment above which identified this was:
"you need to check your incryption setting on the router. You should be running WAP2-PSK AES only. NO TKP. Using TKP will lock your speed to 54mbps."

Hope this also helps others. Post a message if it does!

tmikea Jan 22, 2012, 04:56pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
On a windows box, just run inSSIDer. It tells you under the "Max Rate" column if you are connected via "N".

Larry Beattie Apr 07, 2013, 06:24pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 07, 2013, 09:41pm EDT

 
>> Re: How do i tell if i am connected with N or G on wifi?
Also some routers let you restrict connections by setting the router to b, g, n, or mixed modes as above. Doing so may prevent some of your legacy devices from connecting, though.
Another thing, is even if you do have a dual band N router, you also have to have a dual band adapter [USB/built in, External] to be able to connect at the 5 gigahertz frequency. And, because of the higher frequency, you won't get as far a distance between devices, just a quieter band in which to work.


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