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  Overclocking not working 
 
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Jonathan Reichelt Apr 11, 2011, 11:08am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I have a Quad Core Q9300 (2500mhz) which in bios I have OC to 3,000mhz however when I run benchmarking programs such as cpuz, 3dmark, etc, (7 in total) I continually am shown in WINDOWS 7 that the mhz is registering at 2,500 even though every time my computer starts up in bios it is shown as 3,000mhz. Computer specs are

Motherboard - MSI-7380 (SLI)
CPU - Core 2 Quad Q9300
RAM - DDR2 2048 meg (x2)
Video - Nvidea GeForce GTX 550 ti (cyclone II) (x2)

I can overclock the video to 16.5% more on stock cooling. But the CPU cannot be OC'd, (well, it is OC except it is not being reflected in windows 7 using benchmarking programs). The EIST is disabled (my FSU is increased to 400mhz). Can someone please help me. Is windows somehow preventing bios changes from going through? When my computer is turned on it is overclocked to 3000 however once windows loads it is going down to 2500.

If you only understand overclocking from what you have read on the internet please do not bother replying to this post, I only want people who honestly know what they are talking about and have a lot of experience. Just because you made some minor changes in your Bios doesnt make you a pro at OCing, my problem cannot be fixed by changes in bios this is a problem with windows (unless someone who knows what they are talking about tells me otherwise).

Thankyou for your help.


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micro Apr 11, 2011, 11:56am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Overclocking not working
On my Q6600, cpu-z shows that my cpu is running at 2.4ghz though it is oc'd to 3.0.
The bus how ever runs properly at 333mhz.

I know that it is oc'd as when it it isn't my frames drop in games such as BC2.
Also windows shows it at 3.0.

I think this is just a problem with cpu-z and quad core core 2.

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Jonathan Reichelt Apr 13, 2011, 03:03am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Overclocking not working
I think you may need to read what I wrote, I said I have tried 7 benchmarking programs, not just cpuz. If CPUz had problems with q9300's then other benchmarking programs would be able to recognise it, additionally when i underclock the fsb CPUz and the 7 other ones recognise it even when i go down to 2,000ghz, yet it will not recognise anything above 2500ghz. Its clear that windws is preventing the overclocking from being registered and factory settings are being reset when the OC is on, yet windows makes no changes when OC is not on and cpu is underclocked.

Chris M Apr 14, 2011, 03:34pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Overclocking not working
Did you disable C1E in your BIOS? How did you set your power settings in Windows?

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john albrich Apr 14, 2011, 05:07pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Overclocking not working

Jonathan Reichelt said:
...If you only understand overclocking from what you have read on the internet please do not bother replying to this post, I only want people who honestly know what they are talking about and have a lot of experience. Just because you made some minor changes in your Bios doesnt make you a pro at OCing, my problem cannot be fixed by changes in bios this is a problem with windows (unless someone who knows what they are talking about tells me otherwise).Thankyou for your help.
and
Its clear that windws is preventing the overclocking from being registered and factory settings are being reset when the OC is on, yet windows makes no changes when OC is not on and cpu is underclocked.



I'm sure more people would really like to help, JR, but perhaps they just don't like replying to questions from people who don't have "a lot of experience" to already know the answers.


Your conclusions as to what is "clearly" happening may be based on a false premise...but we can't know this for sure because you haven't told us whether your "7 benchmarking programs" tests consisted of
1) simply looking at reported frequencies or
2) actual benchmarking metrics. In other words...

1) Whether you are simply looking at the various acquired/reported CPU clocking parameters.
e.g. when CPU is NOT overclocked CPUz reports X.YZ GHz and when it IS overclocked CPUz reports the same X.YZ GHz. By the way, CPUz and similar programs are NOT "benchmarking" programs. CPUz for example is a parameter reporting/analysis program that depends mostly on information provided to it directly by the system. Even a program that provides actual benchmarking tools, may however in the clock/frequency reporting sub-section show the same data, even though actual benchmark results show OCing has in fact taken place. A number of factors can affect the data acquired and reported by programs like CPUz, including BIOS, Windows, power management, state of the CPU (e.g. whether frequencies are throttled-down and/or voltage-limited / protected by built-in CPU mechanisms or external programs), etc. Such factors would likely impact the parameter reports from similar Windows-based programs. However, depending on the exact algorithms they use some might produce different numbers. And, if a particular program uses data the other programs ignore (perhaps by using system calls that are not considered the "Microsoft approved" method of obtaining the data, or by executing some quick internal benchmark and then calculating a clock frequency based on some assumptions) it could possibly report a more real-world value...even if it did so by means intended to get around reporting limitations previously mentioned.

OR

2) Whether you've actually performed benchmark tests and compared the execution times and determined there is no significant difference before and after OCing.
e.g. when NOT overclocked prime95* takes X seconds to perform a suite of CPU and/or RAM-targeted tasks, but when it IS overclocked prime95 still takes ~X seconds to perform the same suite of tasks. Presumably if your OC settings are being "reset (to default) by Windows" then before and after OCing performance under Windows would be virtually identical. If however they were substantially different then you know at least some, and perhaps all, of your OC settings were retained and not "reset by Windows". It would then be a parameter acquisition/reporting issue...not a "Windows is resetting things" problem.

For example, if before you OC the CPU and/or RAM you run a Windows benchmark and it says it took 1000ms to execute that routine, and you then OC the CPU and/or RAM (by whatever means needed) and the benchmark program says it now takes only 700ms to execute the same routine under the same conditions, then clearly substantial OCing is taking place...regardless of what CPUz and other simple parametric reporting programs or sub-sections might be reporting to you.


*prime95 is used as just one example of a true Windows-based benchmarking program, and not a program that simply acquires and reports parametric data provided by the system.


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