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  So, compressed air. 
 
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steve mace Apr 20, 2011, 09:27am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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To clean my computer I have been advised that instead of a can, I should get a car tyre type compressor. All the ones I saw use the cig lighter as a power supply. except this one. what the hell is a power point plug. :/

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/NEW-12V-AIR-COMPRESSOR-TYRE-INFLATOR-CAR...9729299116


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micro Apr 20, 2011, 11:59am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
I assume that it is another name for cigarette lighter plug, mainly due to how it is written.

Since this is more of an emergency air compressor with out any air storage tank, i would be worried that this would not have enough FM (air flow) to really be of much good. If you have ever used one of these to try to pump up a tire, they do a poor job.

Hopefully someone else will have some input on this.

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Reason   Apr 20, 2011, 12:26pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 20, 2011, 12:41pm EDT

 
>> Re: So, compressed air.
my understanding is that most air compressors have microdroplets of oil in the air. Oil will eat your PCBs, so that's bad for your computer.

Having said that, I've used an air compressor to clean out my computer without ill effect. It's not mine so I can't confirm but I believe it's oilless.

Cans should be fine, just don't tilt them too much or else they'll freeze and you have to wait for the condensation to evaporate.

What was the reason you should use a compressor over cans?

edit:
Compressors can also spin the fans faster than their bearings can take, wearing them out quickly. You can also break fan blades if you stick the nozzle in the spinning blade accidentally, which I've done.

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micro Apr 20, 2011, 01:19pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
Reason   said:
my understanding is that most air compressors have microdroplets of oil in the air. Oil will eat your PCBs, so that's bad for your computer.

Having said that, I've used an air compressor to clean out my computer without ill effect. It's not mine so I can't confirm but I believe it's oilless.

Cans should be fine, just don't tilt them too much or else they'll freeze and you have to wait for the condensation to evaporate.

What was the reason you should use a compressor over cans?

edit:
Compressors can also spin the fans faster than their bearings can take, wearing them out quickly. You can also break fan blades if you stick the nozzle in the spinning blade accidentally, which I've done.


Good advice Reason.. but..

The air compressor he is looking at has a rubber o-ring on a piston with out an oiled/lubricared cylinder/sump/crank case. Meaning oil is not an issue as there is not any that can be produced by this air compressor.

I use a 40 gallon air compressor to clean my pc monthly with zero problems. Most of the condensation and what little oil there is is most often at the bottom of the tank, which should be drained on a monthly basis.
Home air compressors most likely would not have a line filter, water accumulator but you still shouldn't get any noticeable water/oil from the compressor with this little amount of usage.

As you mentioned, you can easily over spin a fan. For this reason, i place a straw/pencil etc in the fan blades when i clean them out. This has worked well for me for years.

The reason i don't use canned air is.. I already have an air compressor, the cost and inconvenience of buying the canned air on a long term basis. I would recommend canned air to anyone who doesn't have an air compressor or storage room enough for one.

As i said in my original post, i don't think that you can get enough air from a dc air compressor that is tankless to clean out a pc sufficiently or time effectively.
You could always get a portable air tank and fill it with the dc compressor, but i think you would burn up the compressor in short order.

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steve mace Apr 20, 2011, 01:32pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
Gentlemen, thankyou.

I was following this guide, they advised the compressor sue to greater efficeincy over canned air. I think I will not bother with it though and just get the cans.

http://www.technibble.com/how-to-clean-the-inside-of-a-computer-case/

Dr. Peaceful Apr 20, 2011, 02:42pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
Get one of these. 19,000 fm! Just put your mobo / PC underneath it, and blow the f**k out of it. It's a bit expensive at $400, but you can have it for daily use, save some paper.

http://www.exceldryer.com/products_xlerator.php

john albrich Apr 20, 2011, 03:15pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 20, 2011, 03:20pm EDT

 
>> Re: So, compressed air.

Just a warning based on personal experience.

SOME cans of "air" aren't simple air at all and include a "bittering" agent in them to deter people from inhaling the compressed gas to get high.

When I used one of those to clean my computer it fouled up the air in the room for something like a DAY. It stank terribly. Days later the computer itself still stank. My memory is a bit fuzzy but as I recall I only spent about 5 minutes cleaning the computer and did NOT use what I consider a significant portion of the can's contents.

It also apparently contaminated a glass of water I keep about 4 feet or so from the nearest computer, as when I took a sip from it later it tasted AWFUL.

I imagine had dinner been on the table it would have fouled the food as well.

Clearly it was putting something into the air, in fairly high percentages, which goes everywhere and settles on everything. I have no idea how toxic ingesting something like that over time would be (especially by babies) or its impact on other items, but I wouldn't recommend it.

Dr. Peaceful Apr 20, 2011, 03:20pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 20, 2011, 03:22pm EDT

 
>> Re: So, compressed air.
They probably put a skunk into that can. LOL ;)

That's the first time I hear about they put smell in compress air cans, by the way.

steve mace Apr 20, 2011, 03:50pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
But would any of these cans damge the computeter.
None of them technically are advertised for computers. more like keyboards and stuff.

john albrich Apr 20, 2011, 04:16pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.

As long as you stick to compressed AIR you should be okay chemistry-wise. But the moment you switch to a compressed "gas" you need to look at the gas used...there are several gases used between and even by the same manufacturers.

There is also a usage issue, in that if improperly used such cans can produce temperatures WELL below freezing by ejecting contents as a liquid instead of as a gas. A sudden temperature change COULD damage components and/or circuit boards.

Reducing the temperatures on components can also cause immediate and substantial water condensation. That could cause reliability issues and/or failure if the condensate isn't allowed to evaporate before power is applied to the circuitry. The problem could be aggravated if contaminants dissolve into the water and it becomes conductive.

And remember, if a modern computer isn't powered-down by removing the AC mains power (instead of just using the front panel switch) the circuitry in your computer STILL HAS POWER.


(The temperatures produced by the ejected liquid evaporating can also cause frost-bite. Holding the can upside down while "spraying" will produce high volumes of liquid output. Liquid also can be output at lesser volumes even at other angles. Exercise caution.)

Reason   Apr 20, 2011, 04:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 20, 2011, 04:26pm EDT

 
>> Re: So, compressed air.
Good points, micro.

I don't see how you could damage it aside from tilting the can so much you get the freeze effect. Even if there is some type of gas that is bad for it, dust and heat buildup is probably a worse problem.

I'd never heard of that bittering agent, John. Not surprising though, between the nanny state and people who sue for falling into a water fountain while they were texting, you're not allowed to alter your own consciousness and if you do and you get hurt, you can sue whoever made the product you used to do it. Recackulous.

edit:
John beat me to it.

The freezing is fun to play with, if you're not an idiot. We used to stick it in a cup of water and watch the ice patterns form.

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angryhippy Apr 22, 2011, 09:21am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 22, 2011, 09:43am EDT

 
>> Re: So, compressed air.
hi, it's Mr. cheap again. I go to the gas station buy a bag of bugler and get a free token for the tire air machine and clean them off with that. I live on a main street and have a LOT of dust and crud from the streets in my room so i pretty much have to clean my air intake filters every week. About every 6 months or so I just strip it down and give it a thorough cleaning with some electronic component cleaner I get at Fry's. The inside of the case I'll actually wash with soapy water. The cubby hole my unit sits in is only 4 or 5" off the floor.

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PIRATE Apr 22, 2011, 11:35pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
To clean my PC I take it to the shop where my dad and I work, hook up the 1 inch Ingersoll Rand impact wrench (Yeah the one we use to take out truck's lug nuts) and put it close to the computer and pull the trigger, the air that comes out of the exhaust is always more than enough for this task.

Like this: (Picture computer by it)

http://youtu.be/KTbDB2F9sFg

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1SBHack . May 14, 2011, 09:35pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
Shouldn't have to worry about cleaning this one out very many times - the oil from the impact gun should attract enough dust and grime to cause the system to overheat in short order. (I hope you were really kidding.)

Rommel Jul 29, 2011, 10:14pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.
i also use an air compressor. i got tired of buying those cans that don't do the job half as well. my antec 900 two case collects dust like a vacuum. watch out for water in the line.

john albrich Jul 29, 2011, 11:14pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: So, compressed air.

I think I mentioned this somewhere else, but here's what you can do if you want to be EXTRA SUPER careful regarding oils and contaminants that you might get from standard home and service station air compressors (personally, I think the contaminant risk is pretty low with a properly functioning modern air compressor as far as it applies to possibly causing a problem for your computer)

Buy and use an "emergency" SCUBA air tank. These are about the size of a thermos bottle. You can get them refilled with extremely high-quality, dry air for relatively low-cost over buying multiple cans of "compressed gas".

But, the tanks are initially pricey at about US$80 to $150.

Balanced against the cost of the disposable cans (US$4 to $15 each (pirates!)) the initial outlay might be recovered in a few years...and you're using very pure, un-adulterated air.

For an example, search on [ catalina pony bottle ]

SCUBA air refill stations use oil-less compressors with VERY highly filtered and dry output, and compress the air to very high pressures. Because the pressures are extremely high, one fill-up would probably last 2...maybe 3 years of deep cleanings.

The tank also needs a first-stage regulator and a bit of SCUBA hose to direct the air-flow. I think most reserve tanks probably still come supplied with the regulator.

SCUBA air stations also require that a tank have a currently valid inspection and/or may perform the inspection themselves before filling the tank. There may be a slight extra fee for that at your local SCUBA shop.


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