Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 1238 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s December 18 - 05:56am EST 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / Sound / Multimedia /
 

  Speaker question 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
john dabrowski May 25, 2011, 02:41am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List Replies: 2 - Views: 1420
i've googled and have come up empty. Does anyone know what frequency range a cheap pair of earbud headphones works in.

Thanks in advance


Asus P5q-se plus
Intel Core 2 Quad Q9550 @3.4ghz
64gb Crucial SSD
2x2gb G.Skill DDR2 800
Seagate 1tb sata II
Ati All-In-Wonder HD
22" ViewSonic LCD TV as monitor
Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit
Want to enjoy fewer advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
Supreet Virdi May 28, 2011, 05:23pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List

Edited: May 28, 2011, 05:24pm EDT

 
>> Re: Speaker question
Usually 84 - 108 MHz.

____

101% Pure ATI Whoop ASS®!!

http://img397.imageshack.us/img397/1715/picture0011ki.jpg
http://img397.imageshack.us/img397/6671/picture0045rp.jpg
john albrich May 28, 2011, 06:29pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
Private Message - Add to Buddy List

Edited: May 28, 2011, 06:30pm EDT

 
>> Re: Speaker question

I assume you're asking about the audio frequency response?

It's going to vary a LOT from gear to gear, and it depends on how much distortion you're willing to accept. In order to claim wider freq response, some manufacturers will cheat and allow incredible levels of distortion. They will also allow a large degree of non-linear response.

So while yes, it has "great frequency response", it sounds like CRAP.

I could tell you a typical response might be something like 60Hz - 15,000Hz, but again it's kind of meaningless as it depends on too many other parameters and assumptions in how the spec is obtained.

Here's a bit more info on it. I particularly like the bit where they say,
"These limits are always set at the point where there is a 3 dB drop (on the lower and upper frequency limit)."

and immediately follow it with

"Unfortunately, this is not standardized,

and then

"...some manufacturers “cheat” a bit."

Actually....some "cheat" a LOT!


http://europe.beyerdynamic.com/service/faqs/kopfhoerer.html
What ist the Frequency Response?
The frequency response specifies the lowest and highest frequency that the acoustic transducer can reproduce. These limits are always set at the point where there is a 3 dB drop (on the lower and upper frequency limit). Unfortunately, this is not standardized, so it is often the case that some manufacturers “cheat” a bit. Whether headphones really have a frequency response of 20 to 20,000 Hz, for example, remains an open question. The question of what the curve of the frequency response looks like also remains open. Is it linear, or does it go up and down? You would be able to see this on the frequency response curve, but it is rarely included, since it looks pretty “horrible” for most headphones. This matter will be explained in another article. Ideally, you should really rely on your own hearing and simply try out headphones you are considering in a side-by-side comparison. The best way to do this is to compare the headphones to headphones with which you are already familiar.


Write a Reply >>


 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.