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  SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk 
 
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Shannon S Jun 11, 2011, 12:09pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I have a Sony Vaio laptop (VPCEB4AFDL) and yesterday when my laptop was resuming a message appeared saying:
SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
WARNING: Immediately back-up your data and replace your hard disk drive. A failure may be imminent.Press F1 to continue.
Then I press F1 and my laptop resumes just fine. Should I be worried about this warning or is it just a false warning that keeps showing up? I've only had this laptop for a few months so my hard drive shouldn't be failing so early. Please help!


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~Vel Jun 11, 2011, 04:09pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Unless it's being spoofed by malware (which it doesn't sound like it here) you should listen to the message. Backup your data and if your laptop is still under warranty, send it in to be fixed. If it's not under warranty, backup your data and either replace the hard drive yourself, or take it in somewhere locally to have it replaced.

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john albrich Jun 11, 2011, 06:43pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jun 11, 2011, 06:51pm EDT

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk

Just because it's a new drive has NOTHING to do with whether it can fail. It just changes the probabilities. Even a brand new drive can fail the instant you apply power for the very first time on a new computer. You may simply have received a drive that is likely to fail early on. It could be due to damage during shipping, an ESD event, a manufacturing error, etc.

Now that having been said, it's also POSSIBLE that whatever program is declaring the drive will fail is being too conservative. It also depends on which parameter(s) is at issue, what threshold(s) is used, and the algorithm they've designed to decide a drive is going to fail. It could be a single factor, or a combination of factors that caused their algorithm to trigger the alert. Some of these may be completely arbitrary while others are fixed decision points specified by the manufacturer.

You might want to use a program like Speedfan or Passmark's DiskCheckup to get more granular info.
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/77747/#592281
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/77747/#592282


At any rate, I'd be backing up the partition(s) on a daily basis until you have a better handle on it. An excellent FREEWARE backup program alternative is Macrium Reflect Free Edition.
http://majorgeeks.com/Macrium_Reflect_FREE_Edition_d6034.html
http://www.macrium.com/reflectfree.asp



For a better understanding of SMART data and how ONE company uses these data to calculate drive health, go to this website
http://kb.acronis.com/content/9264
Here's an example of a specific SMART parameter's impact on drive failure
http://kb.acronis.com/content/9101


edit to add:
By the way, I've got several hard drives that have been officially declared "In danger of imminent failure" for almost 5 years now.

Shannon S Jun 11, 2011, 10:18pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Thanks, that helps a lot. I used a program called Tune-up Utilities and I did a hard disk scan and it said everything was fine and I have no idea on how I can get more info on the message that keeps appearing when my laptop turns on or resumes. After I press F1 my laptop works just fine that's why I'm confused as to why I keep getting that warning.

Ben Currey Sep 30, 2011, 07:59am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Hi There,

I recently had this problem on my sony vaio laptop - and as with yourself, I performed searches and such and found no issues. My laptop was under Warranty so sent it to Sony - they said I had uninstalled a piece of software on the machine which monitors s.m.a.r.t. notifications and that this was the reason for the error - I don't know which it is - I can't see anything obviously in program files, but it might be worth a call to ask, as re-installing this rectified the issue!

Hope that helps.

Ben

Yayu Yayu Feb 26, 2012, 11:55am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Dear All,

I have same problem with him, My sony vaio VPCEB17FG is having smart failure on hard drive. after i press F1 its loading so long and shut down. Please help me. :(

john albrich Feb 26, 2012, 12:37pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
.
Personally, I would remove the drive from the laptop, and on a different computer I would then...

1) backup the drive using a tool like Macrium Reflect Free Edition (if possible).
Just to be extra-"safe" I would also use a self-booting backup tool (like HDclone) and make a non-Windows backup of the entire drive (Sony may have created "hidden" partitions that a Windows-based backup tool may not "see". That is not uncommon on notebook/laptop computers).

2) check the original drive's SMART data using a third party tool like HDtune, Passmark's DiskCheckup, speedfan, HDDscan, etc. See my earlier post in this forum thread for details re SMART.

3) dynamically test the original drive using an appropriate diagnostic program. Use either a program provided by the drive manufacturer and/or a third-party diagnostic tool like HDtune, HDDscan, UBCD's drive test program, etc.

Most any drive diagnostic programs you might need are freeware or donateware.


I suggest also using a self-booting system testing utility (like UBCD) to test your laptop's memory, CPU, etc. Note: on some computers self-booting programs like UBCD may fail to boot...this is not a program error...it is usually because of manufacturer's proprietary hardware.

Greg J Mar 23, 2012, 07:14pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 23, 2012, 07:15pm EDT

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Tune-up Utilities and a hard disk scan are probably not checking everything. I don't know how smart SMART is, but that warning could be because the error rate from reading disk sectors has become uncomfortably high. In the hard disk itself, error correction is done without reporting this fact to the operating system, because a low amount is normal. When it gets high, however, the hard disk probably does warn the OS, which may have popped up that message you saw. In this case, your hard drive IS going bad. Hence the advice to immediately back it up, and IMO replace it. Working hard drives already crash often enough.

I am a hard disk novice; I'm just relaying some things I've read. I can however claim to have removed platters from a number of hard disks to give them the sandpaper treatment! :D

Sujit Kumar Patra Jul 07, 2012, 06:27am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Hi,
can anyone give me how to resolve the issue.

Regards
Sujit

Sujit Kumar Patra Jul 07, 2012, 06:30am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
can any one give me the permanent solution in this regards.

...Sujit

Ramon Helmus Sep 28, 2012, 04:05am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
I'm having the same message on a Sony Vaio.

Interesting part about what I read here is the use of the program Tune-up.
This has been installed here a couple of days ago and now it shows the message.
Looks like it might not be a coincidence.

If this is the case and Tune-up IS providing the message, could that mean there is nothing seriously wrong with the hard drive?
Or is it in fact telling us what the OS failed to tell us?

john albrich Sep 28, 2012, 04:18pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Sep 28, 2012, 04:28pm EDT

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Ramon Helmus said:
I'm having the same message on a Sony Vaio....could that mean there is nothing seriously wrong with the hard drive? Or is it in fact telling us what the OS failed to tell us?

There is no hard and fast answer to your question. See my first post in this thread, especially as to the references to acronis HDD SMART knowledgbase It may be an "imminent failure" that can be tolerated for a LONG time. Frequent backups can be a reasonable "solution", depending on the criticality of the data to you.

As I also indicated earlier, I've a number of HDDs that have been reporting "imminent failure" for over 6 years now. For the most part, these are issues that involve fully recoverable errors but the threshold exceeds the manufacturer's or the SMART analysis tool's possibly ultra-conservative decision-point as to what constitutes a prediction of "imminent failure". Also, a given SMART analysis tool could use an algorithm that factors-in such items as total power-on-hours, total spin-ups/spin-downs, etc. to the point where simply if a drive is "old" the tool will report "imminent failure", even if the drive is otherwise working perfectly well. An analog would be a diagnostic that tells me that my car is at the point of "imminent failure" and I should replace my car simply because it is over 3 years old and has 40,000 miles on it. A different diagnostic tool could assume 5 year and 60,000 mile failure thresholds.

It can be complicated because each analysis tool tends to use its own unique algorithms to "decide" when there is a risk worth flagging. What is considered an "imminent risk" by one tool may not be considered as such a severe problem by a different tool. That doesn't mean one tool is "better" than the other at finding "bad" drives, it simply means they use different criteria to define "imminent failure".

COULD an "imminent failure" HDD unrecoverably fail tomorrow...in the next minute...the next second? Yes. WILL it do so? In many cases no. However, there is always a level of risk and it's your choice how you decide to manage that risk. Learning the way the analysis tools work is vital, and the measures you take to mitigate that risk (e.g. backups) may be acceptable in a given situation.


edit:
added "replace my car" example

Aditya Kotwal Oct 28, 2012, 08:24pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Hi
My I was formatting my VAIO laptop using vaio recovery center to factory settings. Now it has no OS and also is showing smart failure predication. Whenever I try to restore it to factory settings, the process is taking ages and is not completing.
Pls help me out.
Thanks

Aditya Kotwal Oct 28, 2012, 08:25pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
ps. I have backup of data on my external HDD

Vonchaz Lum York Nov 16, 2012, 10:30pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 16, 2012, 10:35pm EST

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
I have a similiar problem on my sony vaio, i used speedfan and got this diagnostic report http://www.hddstatus.com/hdrepanalysis.php though it says its serious should i really prepare for the worst? I have 235 gigs worth of data to back up, if i do so i would have to buy an external hdd as an immediate remedy or can it be fixed otherwise through a freeware program?

john albrich Nov 16, 2012, 11:52pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Vonchaz Lum York said:
I have a similiar problem on my sony vaio, i used speedfan and got this diagnostic report http://www.hddstatus.com/hdrepanalysis.php though it says its serious should i really prepare for the worst? I have 235 gigs worth of data to back up, if i do so i would have to buy an external hdd as an immediate remedy or can it be fixed otherwise through a freeware program?

You need to show or tell us YOUR result/report. The link you provided leads to a generic sample report.

Providing the flagged "bad" attribute(s) and data should be sufficient.

For additional info on what each attribute means, see:
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/77840/#592852
Note in particular the reference to the http://kb.acronis.com website for SMART attribute interpretation. You would of course have to examine your "bad" attribute and not necessarily the attribute information specified in my referenced link.

Also keep in mind that manufacturers do not necessarily use the same attribute number and may have a unique interpretation for a given model disk drive...even if the same manufacturer owns the different HDD brand name (e.g. Seagate now owns multiple disk drive brands: Samsung, Maxtor, etc, as Western Digital also includes other brands).

Vonchaz Lum York Nov 17, 2012, 12:24am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 17, 2012, 12:27am EST

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Sorry didn't know that link was generic, thought it was mine anyway using speedfan it highlights 2 items that have already reached its threshold namely Reallocated sector count value:1 ,worst:1 warn:50, raw:0000000007FE and the Current pending sector count value:100, worst:100,warn:0, raw: 000000000001. All other items are either green or have noting to indicate otherwise , i hope thats what you wanted to know.

john albrich Nov 17, 2012, 05:31am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 17, 2012, 05:32am EST

 
>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Vonchaz Lum York said:
Sorry didn't know that link was generic, thought it was mine anyway using speedfan it highlights 2 items that have already reached its threshold namely Reallocated sector count value:1 ,worst:1 warn:50, raw:0000000007FE and the Current pending sector count value:100, worst:100,warn:0, raw: 000000000001. All other items are either green or have noting to indicate otherwise , i hope thats what you wanted to know.

See this webpage. http://kb.acronis.com/content/9105

If I'm interpreting your reported info correctly, your drive has reported massive problems with reliability and has used-up all the "spare" sectors available. Suspect sectors can no longer be re-mapped to the "good" spare sectors locations on the drive. In fact, depending on the cause of the problem(s), it's even possible the spare sectors also might be unreliable.

In this situation I recommend replacing the suspect drive.* I would tend to treat any data/files on that drive as potentially corrupt/unreliable until shown otherwise.

There can be multiple causes of failures that result in "filling-up" the spare sectors area on a hard drive. They can be electronic and/or mechanical.

Data Recovery Info
It depends on whether the drive had actual unrecoverable data failures or was just preventively reassigning sectors based on what it considered marginal and likely to imminently fail sectors based on ultimately recoverable data errors. If it was done as a simple precaution in all cases (and not any actual unrecovered data errors) it's possible that your data and files are still intact.

In any case, do not write anymore to that drive...at all. Do not run any tools like chkdsk, defrag, or try to perform data restoration, etc.

If it is your current system drive, then do NOT use it as such anymore. Install a different drive in its place (or use an alternative as described below). Use it only as a secondary drive if you intend to try to recover data/files from it. Do not enable indexing, and don't allow any programs or the OS to add or change data on the drive.

Backup your data using a different source of operating system (e.g. install a clean OS on a different HDD, use a second system to perform the backup, or use a self-booting USB/CD/DVD-driven backup software solution) with the failing drive as the simple source of data.


*While there are ways to reset some SMART counters on some drives, and one could try various reformatting, etc. to try to "recover" the drive, it involves considerable time, a learning curve, and testing at levels most consumers are unable/unwilling to pursue. And, after all that the results are highly iffy as the underlying cause of the problem would likely remain. http://forum.acronis.com/forum/11821

Vonchaz Lum York Nov 17, 2012, 07:13am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
I didn't realise it was that bad, but thanks for the quick response i'll see about getting it replaced. I already ran a disk defrag,and clean not long ago so i feel kinda dumb now but i'll be careful,again thanks for the help.

john albrich Nov 17, 2012, 09:32pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
.
Something to keep in mind is that electrical and/or mechanical causes of massive sector reallocation can be aggravated by temperatures outside the operational limits of an HDD. In most situations this usually is a high temp issue.

Thus, it would be a good idea to just in case also make sure that the HDD temps aren't too high or the problem might return with the replacement HDD. Generally mechanical HDD operating max temps are 55C +/- 5C.

Although you didn't report any max temperature SMART attribute warning, it's possible your specific HDD simply didn't track/report that value. Most do, but some don't...so this might be an unknown in your situation.

Vonchaz Lum York Nov 17, 2012, 11:42pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: SMART Failure Predicted on Hard Disk
Quite correct on that one, it says my temp:44-47c and the core is 53c so the heat was probably the cause( my laptop is an E-series vaio).I read that the heat may be caused by dust building up on the fan and at other ducts in my laptop in which case it requires dusting out. I'll have to mention doing both with i send it in then.


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