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  Computer fan running non stop? 
 
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Andrea Smith Oct 02, 2011, 05:37pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Does the fan run immediately a desktop starts. ?

Something in mine
http://aldi.medion.com/md8341/uk/?refPage=aldi
usually runs for a few seconds but now is staying on all the time and is very loud. Is there any way to turn it off. PC is not hot - any air from tower is cool but the bios says the cpu fan is 106 c.

Speed fan said it was around 36

Bios says CPU fan speed is 2912 rpm

This happens occasionally it usually makes a little noise at boot and stops. Now it stops briefly and starts again


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micro Oct 02, 2011, 07:20pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
106 C on your cpu is way way too hot. That would account for the fan running full speed.

If speed fan says 36C when you are at idle, that is fine.

There is either a problem in bios telling the fan that the cpu is too hot, or the cpu is too hot.

I would remove the cpu cooler, clean, re apply the thermal past (good quality stuff) and that should fix the problem. The cooler may have just come loose.
If not, you may try updating your bios.

Another temp program: http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/hwmonitor.html


GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3, 2600k @ 4.0
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Win 7 64, fsp fx700-gln, Razer DA,G15
Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid
Silence in the face of evil is it's self Ev
Andrea Smith Oct 02, 2011, 07:27pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
but it could not be 106 just after starting?
BIOS says CPU temp 106
System temp 37

micro Oct 02, 2011, 11:04pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
Andrea Smith said:
but it could not be 106 just after starting?
BIOS says CPU temp 106
System temp 37


If your cooler is not fitting proper, that temp could happen easily in 1 second.

GA-Z68X-UD3H-B3, 2600k @ 4.0
16 gig Corsair Vengeance
Evga gtx 260 216, samsung 2253lw"
Baracuda 7,200.12 CoolerMaster 212 +
Win 7 64, fsp fx700-gln, Razer DA,G15
Evil is powerless if the good are unafraid
Silence in the face of evil is it's self Ev
Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 04:22am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
micro said:
Andrea Smith said:
but it could not be 106 just after starting?
BIOS says CPU temp 106
System temp 37


If your cooler is not fitting proper, that temp could happen easily in 1 second.

ok thanks did not know that

Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 04:23am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
micro said:
Andrea Smith said:
but it could not be 106 just after starting?
BIOS says CPU temp 106
System temp 37


If your cooler is not fitting proper, that temp could happen easily in 1 second.

ok thanks did not know that

john albrich Oct 03, 2011, 04:26am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 03, 2011, 04:28am EDT

 
>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
.
The easiest solution might be before you try updating your BIOS or re-applying thermal paste...try clearing your CMOS back to default settings. Be sure to follow the instructions for doing so as specified in your user manual. This is often done by using a "jumper" on a pair of pins on the motherboard.

On occasion, CMOS contents can be 'glitched' by hardware (e.g. static discharge, voltage spike, etc) or software events. Also possible if you had any system freezes just before you noticed this. A "glitch" could affect such things as the voltage applied to the CPU, clock settings, etc. which could result in high temps, and on some motherboards it could affect BIOS-level sensor reading/reporting algorithms which could result in inappropriate system response to what it perceives as high temperature(s).

As for the difference between Speedfan and BIOS, they could be looking at different sensors. There are usually several thermal sensors associated with the CPU (e.g. on-die, core-specific, "case", etc.) Some change much faster than others. For example, it can take the "case" sensor a bit longer to respond to both increasing and decreasing temperatures.

The actual BIOS chip can be "glitched" as well, although that happens less often than "glitching" the BIOS Settings memory.

Given the increasing potential for adverse effects of different recovery methods, I'd try them in this order, testing between each step:
1) Clear CMOS back to default settings
2) If your computer has a "backup" BIOS try re-loading that to the operational BIOS
3) Re-apply thermal compound (follow instructions for the heat-sink being used)
4) Re-load or update BIOS from downloaded file from manufacturer

Item 4 is much less risky with newer motherboards, but still has the potential to turn the computer into a paperweight, so that's why it's the last method listed. It should be considered a "last ditch" recovery method. BIOS update procedures and tools have a higher risk of this happening on motherboards older than a year or two.

Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 05:29am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
john albrich said:
.
The easiest solution might be before you try updating your BIOS or re-applying thermal paste...try clearing your CMOS back to default settings. Be sure to follow the instructions for doing so as specified in your user manual. This is often done by using a "jumper" on a pair of pins on the motherboard.

On occasion, CMOS contents can be 'glitched' by hardware (e.g. static discharge, voltage spike, etc) or software events. Also possible if you had any system freezes just before you noticed this. A "glitch" could affect such things as the voltage applied to the CPU, clock settings, etc. which could result in high temps, and on some motherboards it could affect BIOS-level sensor reading/reporting algorithms which could result in inappropriate system response to what it perceives as high temperature(s).

As for the difference between Speedfan and BIOS, they could be looking at different sensors. There are usually several thermal sensors associated with the CPU (e.g. on-die, core-specific, "case", etc.) Some change much faster than others. For example, it can take the "case" sensor a bit longer to respond to both increasing and decreasing temperatures.

The actual BIOS chip can be "glitched" as well, although that happens less often than "glitching" the BIOS Settings memory.

Given the increasing potential for adverse effects of different recovery methods, I'd try them in this order, testing between each step:
1) Clear CMOS back to default settings
2) If your computer has a "backup" BIOS try re-loading that to the operational BIOS
3) Re-apply thermal compound (follow instructions for the heat-sink being used)
4) Re-load or update BIOS from downloaded file from manufacturer

Item 4 is much less risky with newer motherboards, but still has the potential to turn the computer into a paperweight, so that's why it's the last method listed. It should be considered a "last ditch" recovery method. BIOS update procedures and tools have a higher risk of this happening on motherboards older than a year or two.

Thanks for that, much appreciated

john albrich Oct 03, 2011, 08:27am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 03, 2011, 08:58am EDT

 
>> Don't Blindly Trust Any Temperature Reporting Program Or Source
.
Another reason you might see a difference between Speedfan and BIOS temperatures, is that what you think is the CPU temp in speedfan, is possibly the system ambient sensor reading. On highly customizable advanced system monitors/controllers like Speedfan, it's up to the user to verify a given datum is paired with the correct parameter.


When you get your problem resolved, you might also want to check out the program
http://majorgeeks.com/Open_Hardware_Monitor_d6396.html

Open Hardware Monitor as an example in particular will show you the multiple CPU subsystem sensors (if available). For example, on my system it shows 3 independent (and often significantly different) temps for the CPU, and displays 4 temps in total when including the system "ambient" temperature. It also attempts to display Hard Drive temperatures if the system and drives support SMART and I opt to include those outputs.

When using a 3rd party system monitoring program one must also understand that authors/programmers and manufacturers do make mistakes. They may use the wrong sensor input and/or the wrong data algorithm and/or the wrong device specification to produce the final displayed temperature or temperature alarm threshold. Or, the manufacturer may have errors in the CPU/CPU family specifications. I've seen examples of all four errors over the years regardless whether they were freeware or high-cost monitoring programs. In general BIOS reported values are more reliable, however I have also seen motherboard BIOS revisions that included temperature sensor correcting fixes.

And, just to make things even more complicated...

Also, with some third party programs, one has to enter "offsets" to get the real temperature of a given device reported on the display. This can apply to CPUs, ambients, hard drives, etc. However, some programs don't allow the user to do so...at their peril. For example, when I use a program called CoreTemp on a certain motherboard/CPU combination, I MUST add 16C degrees to get an approximated display of the actual likely value. That's because without an offset CoreTemp reports an "idle" CPU temp of 20C when the room temperature is 25C and the system ambient is 31C (as reported by both multiple different programs and by lab-grade temperature instrumentation). However, a device temperature below its surrounding (or air intake) ambient temperature is impossible in a passive (no thermo-electric/refrigeration) cooling system. So, I have to use other temperature data to calibrate CoreTemp's displayed CPU temp. In this case, I very crudely simply decided to offset the CPU reported temp (while "idle") so that it at least equaled the actual system ambient temp (31C-20C=11C), then I added an additional 5C to provide a safety margin of error for my assumption, for a final adjusted output of 20C(coretemp)+11C(ambient difference offset)+5C(safetymargin offset)=36C (final displayed value for CPU at idle). I hypothesize the reason CoreTemp's displayed value is wrong, is because it likely uses an incorrect algorithm to calculate the actual temperature from the raw temperature data provided by the system. (However, in doing so I have also assumed the error propagates linearly...which may be an invalid assumption. That means that for each degree it is "wrong", it is always off by that same amount regardless of the temperature range (e.g. whether the temperature is in the low 30's or more than 50C). It could be non-linear, but so far it seems to track closely enough with other programs and instrumentation...once I've added that offset.) However, with a different motherboard and/or CPU, it's possible CoreTemp might provide the correct value without the need for any corrective offset(s). Only trying it in situ would show me what corrections are needed, if any.
http://majorgeeks.com/Core_Temp_d5665.html



edit:
minor cleanup, added mfgs also make mistakes, and clarification "(no thermo-electric/refrigeration)"

edit:
fixed 1 incidence where I referred to "CoreTemp" when I meant "Open Hardware Monitor"
added URL to CoreTemp

Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 04:46pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 03, 2011, 04:55pm EDT

 
>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
Screenshot of HW mon http://www2.picturepush.com/photo/a/6687010/640/6687010.jpg
What is the 106 temp? Only one fan must be CPU fan. The tower is quite cool and any air coming out is cool

Thanks for all the feedback

Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 04:55pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 03, 2011, 06:12pm EDT

 
>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
i found that just moving to open sorted it, must have been something on the fan that fell off. Temp now down to normal. The fan is on all the time just so quiet I barely hear it. Thanks everyone that hardware monitor is a great program
here is link to new test note temperature number 2

http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/6687273/640/6687273.png

Thanks again especially john albrich forthe long post and link:D

EDIT sorry I made a new post with nothing in it. I am trying to work from 2 computers:D

Andrea Smith Oct 03, 2011, 06:08pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?

john albrich Oct 03, 2011, 08:49pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
Andrea Smith said:
i found that just moving to open sorted it, must have been something on the fan that fell off. Temp now down to normal....


Riiiight...

Ahem. Obviously what I REALLY meant to say earlier was:

Given the increasing potential for adverse effects of different recovery methods, I'd try them in this order, testing between each step:
1) Move or gently whack the computer
2) Clear CMOS back to default settings
3) If your computer has a "backup" BIOS try re-loading that to the operational BIOS
4) Re-apply thermal compound (follow instructions for the heat-sink being used)
5) Re-load or update BIOS from downloaded file from manufacturer

:P

Glad the issue is resolved. Every now and then you just run into something "odd". Hope it doesn't come back.

Glad also that you like the Open Hardware Monitor program.

Andrea Smith Oct 05, 2011, 03:30pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 05, 2011, 03:42pm EDT

 
>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
Thanks for that. I opened but did not have any compressed air so will do soon. As you can see it is a bit dusty http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/6698828/640/6698828.jpg


What is the blue expansion slot circled in green and highlight yellow? Is it an expansion slot?
Is that the video card at the end of red arrow?
What is the square thing with the black wire over hanging it to left of green circle highlighted pink?

There are three fans, CPU, what I think is video card and psu
Thanks

john albrich Oct 05, 2011, 06:10pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Oct 05, 2011, 06:12pm EDT

 
>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
Andrea Smith said:
Thanks for that. I opened but did not have any compressed air so will do soon. As you can see it is a bit dusty http://www5.picturepush.com/photo/a/6698828/640/6698828.jpg


What is the blue expansion slot circled in green and highlight yellow? Is it an expansion slot?
Is that the video card at the end of red arrow?
What is the square thing with the black wire over hanging it to left of green circle highlighted pink?

There are three fans, CPU, what I think is video card and psu
Thanks


In order,

Yes, that appears to be an basic PCI expansion slot. Your user manual can tell you more about it.
That does look like the video card, with heat sink and fan at the end of the arrow. If the video display cable connects directly to it, that clinches it.
The square thing is a heatsink for a large "chip" or "module" that handles a lot of the internal functions of the motherboard. It might handle sound, various input/output, etc.

edit:
added bit about video display cable

Andrea Smith Oct 05, 2011, 06:26pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Computer fan running non stop?
OK thanks again


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