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  ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue **UPDATE - FIXED** 
 
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DoubleDouble Jan 03, 2012, 11:56am EST Report Abuse
Hello guys!

I just built my PC with the above mainboard.

Computer runs great - no issues except a minor one that happens intermittently - and ONLY after the computer has been powered off for a long period of time ( say over 4 hours ).

I will power on the PC, it will never get to post, it will then power off and power back on, then post, boot and work just fine.

All BIOS settings remain consistent with how they were set - and if I change a simple value ( ie. the boot order ) and then the above event happens - the BIOS settings stay the same and will not revert to the originals. So I can not see it being a bad setting in the BIOS - although could it be a ram speed/timing issue? I get no LEDs on the board pointing to a memory issue.

There are BIOS updates for it 'to improve system stability' that I have not tried yet.

Temps are all fine - PSU is sufficient, and once in Windows - system runs smooth and has no problems.

Specs:

i5 2500k @ stock speeds
Asus P8Z68-V LE
Asus AMD Radeon 6950
1TB Seagate Barracuda
2x4GB Corsair Vengeance CL9 1600mhz 1.5V
Silverstone Strider Gold 750W

Mainboard:

http://www.asus.com/Motherboards/Intel_Socket_1155/P8Z68V_LE/





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john albrich Jan 03, 2012, 02:45pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
.
IF you have manually configured your motherboard BIOS settings (to overclock to force running at 1600MHz RAM for example), it might first TRY to use those settings in the initial POST, and if that fails it might be reverting to default settings (e.g. so the RAM runs at 1333MHz (for example)) and then POSTs and boots-up using the default settings. That would mean the computer is NOT running at your manually set speed settings but at default settings.

Once the system is up and running, you might try using a tool like freeware CPU-z to interrogate the real-time frequencies to verify they are in fact what you set them to. If things are running at different values then that's probably the scenario that's taking place.

IF that is the case, then SOMETIMES increasing the BIOS settings for RAM and/or CPU voltage by VERY small increments at a time can stabilize the operation for successful first-time POST. But you MUST be very careful not to exceed device ratings and to ensure they don't overheat. See overclocking threads/fora/websites for more info on that.


edit to add:
In the case of Intel boards that use XMP to "automatically" try to set the board for higher-frequency RAM (like the 1600MHz RAM) where you shouldn't have to manually set BIOS settings to run at 1600MHz, it could be a case of the board being unable to run things at 1600MHz and then decreasing until stable operation is achieved. I don't know if that's how your board would operate but would consider the possibility if you're using XMP-certified RAM. Also, check the motherboard manufacturer's "approved" memory list to see if it's been tested to run with your specific RAM. Here again, a tool like CPU-z should show if any automatic decrease in speeds is taking place after an initially failed POST in order to get the system running on the retry. That could confirm the possible scenario.



IF this was the case, it's possible the RAM is marginal and unstable at its rated speed, OR it's not approved for the motherboard, OR the motherboard is marginal and can't handle the higher speed RAM, OR PSU voltages are unstable or out of spec, OR etc.

DoubleDouble Jan 03, 2012, 03:00pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
john albrich said:
.
IF you have manually configured your motherboard BIOS settings (to overclock to force running at 1600MHz RAM for example), it might first TRY to use those settings in the initial POST, and if that fails it might be reverting to default settings (e.g. so the RAM runs at 1333MHz (for example)) and then POSTs and boots-up using the default settings. That would mean the computer is NOT running at your manually set speed settings but at default settings.


Once the system is up and running, you might try using a tool like freeware CPU-z to interrogate the real-time frequencies to verify they are in fact what you set them to. If things are running at different values then that's probably the scenario that's taking place.

IF that is the case, then SOMETIMES increasing the BIOS settings for RAM and/or CPU voltage by VERY small increments at a time can stabilize the operation for successful first-time POST. But you MUST be very careful not to exceed device ratings and to ensure they don't overheat. See overclocking threads/fora/websites for more info on that.


edit to add:
In the case of Intel boards that use XMP to "automatically" try to set the board for higher-frequency RAM (like the 1600MHz RAM) where you shouldn't have to manually set BIOS settings to run at 1600MHz, it could be a case of the board being unable to run things at 1600MHz and then decreasing until stable operation is achieved. I don't know if that's how your board would operate but would consider the possibility if you're using XMP-certified RAM. Also, check the motherboard manufacturer's "approved" memory list to see if it's been tested to run with your specific RAM.


All BIOS settings are at default - apart from the boot order change to check if values remained consistent after the reboot.

The strangest issue for me is that it will only do it if the system has been powered off for a certain period of time. I can use the computer, power it off for ten seconds, then power it on fine without an issue. If I power it off, go to bed and wake up in the morning - the issue returns. If I power it off, leave it for 3 hours and turn it back on, the issue returns.

Is there some sort of residual power issue occurring?

john albrich Jan 03, 2012, 03:16pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
DoubleDouble said:
...The strangest issue for me is that it will only do it if the system has been powered off for a certain period of time. I can use the computer, power it off for ten seconds, then power it on fine without an issue. If I power it off, go to bed and wake up in the morning - the issue returns. If I power it off, leave it for 3 hours and turn it back on, the issue returns.
Is there some sort of residual power issue occurring?


I'd still verify settings using a utility, however...

Something thermal could be involved. Thermal problems are tricky. They can be very consistent or result in varying symptoms. For example, some components in the PSU or motherboard could be fine when operating within a certain temperature envelope, and then become squirrely when they fall even just a little bit outside that envelope...and the envelope can change. I've seen a "good when warm, bad when cool" scenario with the Northbridge chip on AMD motherboards. It was stable when warm, but unstable when cool. But the timeframe was much faster than 3 hours.

It could be that if you shut off the PSU using the rear switch or the AC mains plug the "3 hours" will decrease substantially. This is because when you use the front-panel switch, it doesn't actually turn off the PSU. The mother board is still getting SOME power from the PSU, so some components would not cool down as quickly as when ALL power is removed. You might also try opening the case. In some cases that will also decrease the time required for components to cool down and could reveal a shift in the symptom timing. One could also use an external desk fan blowing into the open case to accelerate the cool-down.

john albrich Jan 03, 2012, 03:31pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
.
A "beginning to fail" disk drive could also present such a start-up symptom. After it warms up even a little bit, it works properly...but from a dead-cold start it is marginal and may or may not fail until it warms up just a bit. Disk drive thermal cool-down can take quite a while, especially when they aren't being cooled by a running fan.

You might look at the HDD SMART data and see if anything is happening there (e.g. excessive spin-up time, excessive seek error rate, read errors, and more) Three freeware tools that try to provide some intelligent analyses of the SMART data are
Disk Checkup (Passmark's version)
speedfan (using the SMART tab)
HD Tune (using the Health tab)

A good source of vetted freeware utilities is majorgeeks.com


edit: added HD Tune to list

mothow Jan 03, 2012, 08:29pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
I haven't noticed my Asus P8Z68-V Pro doing this.Ill have to pay more attention the next time i boot up

ASRock Z97 Extreme 4 / i7 4790K / Corsair H80i / 4x4GB Crucial Ballistix Smart Tracer DDR3 1600 / 1TB Western Digital Caviar Black / 240GB Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD / 2x Evga GTX 670 FTW 2GB in SLI / Sound Blaster Recon3D Fatal1ty / Corsair HX1000w
DoubleDouble Jan 04, 2012, 12:46pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue
Updated BIOS which fixed the issue. Still unknown what caused it but oh well!

john albrich Jan 04, 2012, 01:09pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: ASUS P8Z68-V LE Reboot Issue **UPDATE - FIXED**
DoubleDouble said:
Updated BIOS which fixed the issue. Still unknown what caused it but oh well!

Possibly firmware not properly dealing with BIOS settings. For example, if the CMOS memory was set to a RAM voltage of 1.500 volts, flawed firmware could have "mis-read" the setting or simply added/subtracted an improper offset which could affect reliability as a function of temperature. Voltage settings of CPU and RAM can influence how the hardware runs as a function of varying temperatures.

CPU-z (or similar) might have uncovered that kind of settings issue (e.g. you/firmware sets RAM to 1.500 volts but it shows up as (and was actually set to) 1.400 volts). But then again, if the problem was also reflected in how the firmware reports the values (which has occurred in other mobo firmware problems), it might not show up in any reporting program.
Recent personal example: I had a Gigabyte mobo firmware that intermittently REPORTED the wrong CPU fan RPMs to the system and Windows system interrogation programs, but only when the fan was set to PWM-control mode. But, it reported RPMs properly in voltage-control mode. This resulted in the system improperly controlling the fan speed and issuing false alarms when in PWM-control mode, even though the low-level hardware was verified via lab instrumentation as reporting the correct fan RPM to the system.



 

    
 
 

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