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  WiFi Range solutions 
 
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R G Jan 13, 2012, 10:29am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Hi

Ive been called out to a company that has 3 WiFi Aps 1 working as a Repeater.
Problem is even with 3 of them the signal is just horrible and Drops way to much to be able to use it on a day to day bases in a business environment.

Apparently I can seem to be able to buy Directional Antennas and also dont want to make my own.Does anyone have any ideas on what I could do?
Will it be possible to extend my Antenna from the AP and place it on the roof with some kind of Wire in between?

Thanks
RG


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micro Jan 13, 2012, 11:53am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 13, 2012, 11:58am EST

 
>> Re: WiFi Range solutions
A wifi directional antenna could very well be your solution.

A grid/parabolic dish is rather large and would most likely have to go on a roof.It has a round wire frame and looks like a satellite dish.

A yagi could be set up indoors. It looks like a vhf antenna turned sideways. A good one is 13 prongs and about 3' long, so could set along a wall, assuming it is in the proper location.
Here is an example. You can get these with or without a sub dongle.. Usb dongle version goes straight to a pc, the cabled version goes to a router.These can be in G and also N.
http://www.ebay.com/itm/Yagi-Antenna-17dB-802-11G-wifi-USB-Wi-...2ead99f449

You may need an antenna on both ends, though just adding one directional antenna will do a lot.

The low loss cable that you use from the router to the antenna has as much if not more to do with the gain than the antenna its self. If you use cheap cable, you may have less of a connection than you did without the directional antenna. Low loss antenna may be nearly 3/8-1/2" thick.

EDIT:
You could try higher gain omni directional antenna on the router its self, it just depends on how close you are to a solid connection. But this may be an experiment, if trying to save a few $.

Xirrus is a great program to test your signal strength.
http://www.xirrus.com/Products/Wi-Fi-Inspector

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john albrich Jan 13, 2012, 01:17pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jan 13, 2012, 01:19pm EST

 
>> Re: WiFi Range solutions
R G said:
...Problem is even with 3 of them the signal is just horrible and Drops way to much to be able to use it on a day to day bases in a business environment.

Apparently I can seem to be able to buy Directional Antennas....


And sometimes the problem is just crappy WiFi hardware. Where possible, I'd also try testing with known good hardware and firmware to see if it makes a difference in reported signal strength and/or frequency of connection resets. Reading user reviews from multiple websites like newegg, tigerdirect, tomshardware, etc. can provide some insight into adapters that are just dogs.

The earlier point about cable quality is very valid. Many low-cost antenna use garbage cables or they are too long, and substantial signal loss is introduced by the cable itself. Unfortunately, simply looking for higher price adapter/antenna doesn't guarantee higher-quality cable. GENERALLY speaking, a really flexible or thin cable at these frequencies is indicative of lossy shielding, and/or lossy insulating materials, and/or poor impedance matching.

Chris Mcdonald Jan 14, 2012, 01:55pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: WiFi Range solutions
Hi,

Designing and deploying a Long Range WiFi Network requires more than just high power transmitters and antennas. so better to have those first and the need experienced person to install them correctly..


UK

http://www.techyv.com/questions/wi-fi-connection-troubles-usin...sys-router

BoT Jan 16, 2012, 01:24am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: WiFi Range solutions

You can either be part of the problem or be part of the solution.
Codisha - http://www.codisha.com
Reviews - http://www.codisha.com/reviews/reviews.htm
Kevin Greenwood Nov 24, 2012, 01:35am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: WiFi Range solutions
I also have a motorola SURFboard SBG6580 located in the corner of our basement office. It's great, but doesn't reach the farthest reaches of the main floor. I also have a SBG901 wireless cable modem sitting in the closet. How would I go about converting the SBG901 into a repeater? Is that possible?

Thanks!


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