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  Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google 
 
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john albrich Mar 20, 2012, 06:01am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 29, 2012, 10:03pm EDT

Replies: 5 - Views: 2741
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Privacy Awareness Caution

The CAUTION in this post simply is to be aware that when you now sign-in to YouTube (for example, to post a comment), it simultaneously signs you in to Google...

...which means your subsequent searches on Google will now be tracked and correlated to your sign-on information until you specifically sign-out from Google or YouTube. I assume the same applies for other, perhaps all, Google products/services.

I don't know to what degree Google aggregates your data for all services, but I would assume it's very aggressive and efficient.


When I noticed this on my account, I did some sign-in/sign-out experiments on YouTube and Google. If when creating your sign-in accounts you provided a different screen-name for YouTube than you did for Google, YouTube will still show your "YouTube" screen-name, and Google will still show your "Google" screen-name. If you setup different passwords, the same applies.

Personally, I think the LEAST Google should do is warn you in real-time when signing in to one service you are ALSO automatically signed-in to their other services.

My understanding is that when you sign-in to Google, under the recently changed privacy policies, your search activity will be logged, and may be provided to 3rd parties with significant detail. It would also be available to government agencies via a "simple" National Security Letter (NSL). Supposedly, if you are signed-in to Google when searching, your activity is not tracked with the same level of detail (even though they obviously still have a record of the IP address you are using.

Interestingly, I recently read Google claims they actually insist on judge-approved warrants before they will provide your information to a government agency, even when served with an NSL. I'm not sure how that works as a simple NSL is a legally enforceable Federal instrument of compulsion. An NSL can be issued by a NON-judicial, relatively low-level NON-independent employee of an agency (e.g. a field manager may issue an NSL). Probable cause is not required. For more info on NSLs see Wikipedia.


edit to add:
Google's new privacy policy allows Google to aggregate your personal information from some SIXTY separate services: Gmail, Google Search, Android phones, YouTube, etc. (mostly to tailor advertising to the user). There are also ongoing claims of such aggregation being illegal in the EU, and some individual countries such as Japan, South Korea, etc. (source: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-2122027/New-Goo...-been.html)


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Meats_Of_Evil Mar 20, 2012, 10:13pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google
Yeah this has been around for a while I absolutely hate it though I think I managed to evade it somehow sine I only need my yahoo account to log in and not a gmail account.

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BoT Mar 21, 2012, 06:43pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google
the point is to have a unified login. accessing all services at once and collaborating all gathered data in one place. instead of having multiple locations with the same or similar data sets.
i think much of the media craze about is pretty unwarranted.
why would some using multiple service from google have a problem that these services share data or are being consolidated?
many of the features in the services are already shared. google maps uses google search and so does google navigation which in turn also uses google maps. gmail integrates with chrome and so does g+ which also shares data with search, maps and youtube and youtube uses search. after all most of the service already share your data and really it does not matter a whole lot if you sign in or not since your data is also linked to gps and location data as well as ip and mac data

You can either be part of the problem or be part of the solution.
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john albrich Mar 21, 2012, 08:00pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google
BoT said:
...why would some using multiple service from google have a problem that these services share data or are being consolidated?...and really it does not matter a whole lot if you sign in or not since your data is also linked to gps and location data as well as ip and mac data

I'm not one of the new generation of social network users who think it's "wonderful" to give an all-access public pass to my life, business, clients, and family. Anything that increases that exposure OR puts some elements out of my easy 100% control...has to be carefully evaluated and in some cases I either severely limit or don't even participate in a given venue.

I and others have major legal and privacy concerns with any IT environments wherein all one's data across multiple domains, different data elements (e.g. mail v. client data v. confidential business files, content, etc) can be accessed if a single login is compromised. Example, one data security slip-up and one can forever lose a Patent. Intent on how the data were "released" is irrelevant. For example, while traveling I may feel comfortable using someone else's WiFi point for YouTube, but NOT for Gmail, contacts, research, or etc. Not only could the WiFi operator be shady, but there are people using sniffers out there in public areas, that can capture data or piggyback on inadequately secured network data, etc...and there are a lot of poorly secured networks.

There are ways to reduce the risk, but most people don't and won't use them, especially if they aren't even aware of the exposure to begin with. This "feature" of automated multiple logins on apparently ALL my Google userIDs took me totally by surprise. I'd not read anything about multiple automated logins in the industry press.

BoT Mar 23, 2012, 01:04am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google
i understand and see some of your concerns, especially about security.
i am not a new generation and neither much of a social network user but i can see how this can make things easier for me and google.
the information is no more public then it was before. security is a big factor in this and with having all services combined this makes a single user a much larger target as if one service is compromised, all services are compromised.

You can either be part of the problem or be part of the solution.
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Reviews - http://www.codisha.com/reviews/reviews.htm
john albrich Mar 23, 2012, 03:42am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Privacy Caution: Sign-in to YouTube=Sign-in to Google
BoT said:
i understand and see some of your concerns, especially about security.
i am not a new generation and neither much of a social network user but i can see how this can make things easier for me and google.
the information is no more public then it was before. security is a big factor in this and with having all services combined this makes a single user a much larger target as if one service is compromised, all services are compromised.


It may come as a shock, but If one believes "convenience" is worth giving up operational security (whether from the "public", corporations, government, or even simply making things easier for hackers) then one IS a member of the "new" generation of data consumers.


(I'd also remind folks that a huge concern here is that in this case, the "cross-pollinating" of sign-ons and passwords is their default mode, and that they do NOT tell the user in real-time of the fact he was simultaneously logged-in to multiple domains. IMO it's also a clear tell-tale how much they are concerned about the users...which likely reflects on how well they treat the security of the user's data)


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