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  2 Separate Networks/1 ISP 
 
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Scott Johnson Nov 13, 2012, 03:27pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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I've been tasked with setting up 2 separate networks on the floor of a building that houses 2 different theater companies/theaters. The ISP cable modem will be located in one theater (due to old infrastructure it's not possible for each theater to have it's own ISP drop). Each theater would like a wireless network of their own. I could plug Theater #1 router into the cable modem, then run a long cable from one of its LAN ports to Theater #2's router, which would have DHCP disabled and be operating in Access Point mode. Different SSID's and widely separated channels, discrete Admin passwords and wireless security. But I'm thinking it makes more sens to buy something like the small Cisco router that would let me have up to 3 ports configured as WAN ports, and plug each router into one of the WAN ports, keeping them on separate subnets, etc. These are 2 small nonprofit groups and no one knows anything about networking. I'm sitting in my CCNA Bootcamp class and have only the smallest networking knowledge, so any thoughts would be appreciated.


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john albrich Nov 13, 2012, 10:01pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Nov 13, 2012, 10:09pm EST

 
>> Re: 2 Separate Networks/1 ISP
.
Before you get too invested in the technical side, you should likely investigate whether:

a) ISP allows such an arrangement

b) Local codes allow such utilities sharing. In some cities I've run across codes that restrict such utility sharing arrangements.

c) The entities should BOTH talk with their tax and business lawyers about the local and federal tax consequences of two different legal entities sharing hardware and IT resources in the manner you described. They should also understand their legal exposures regarding activities conducted by one group possibly affecting the other. For example, what happens if there is a search warrant or wire-tapping, etc. applied against one of the entities? By sharing such resources, is the second entity exposing itself to legal actions/problems encountered for any reason by the other? (for example, if some employee or volunteer at one entity violates copyrights, decides to use their platform to inject viruses onto the internet, etc. I would imagine that law enforcement would start by going after both entities in any investigation "because they are connected" and even if "found innocent" the second entity could face prohibitively expensive legal battles, lost time, possible confiscation of hardware and loss of data, and so on.)

Scott Johnson Nov 14, 2012, 12:52pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: 2 Separate Networks/1 ISP
These are two extremely small non-profit theater groups. We're not particularly concerned about any of that. I'm more concerned about getting the network(s) running separately and securely. I'll leave the discussion of legalities to another forum, thanks. ;-)

john albrich Nov 18, 2012, 09:17pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: 2 Separate Networks/1 ISP
Scott Johnson said:
These are two extremely small non-profit theater groups. We're not particularly concerned about any of that...I'll leave the discussion of legalities to another forum, thanks.


I hadn't planned a discussion...just provided a sincere warning. I hope you at the very least share my info with the leadership of the not-for-profit groups so they can make informed decisions and you aren't making the decision for them.

Some of the very worst things a not-for-profit can do is make legal or tax assumptions. Such mistakes risk the legal involvement and personal assets of all those involved in the not-for-profit organization(s).

Steven Arnold Nov 20, 2012, 12:58am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: 2 Separate Networks/1 ISP
Hello Friends,

Two routers, each with a different IP scheme
Router A: 192.168.3.1
Router B: 192.168.4.1
Then just change your NIC's IP address and default gateway to match whichever router you want to use.
They also make Dual WAN routers which you can plug two ISPs into, then create rules so some traffic goes out one ISP and other traffic goes out the other ISP, while keeping your laptop connect to the router's LAN port.

Best Regards
Steven Arnold

http://www.esgninc.com/

Sabrina Clough Nov 23, 2012, 11:16pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: 2 Separate Networks/1 ISP
john albrich said:
.
Before you get too invested in the technical side, you should likely investigate whether:

a) ISP allows such an arrangement

b) Local codes allow such utilities sharing. In some cities I've run across codes that restrict such utility sharing arrangements.

c) The entities should BOTH talk with their tax and business lawyers about the local and federal tax consequences of two different legal entities sharing hardware and IT resources in the manner you described. They should also understand their legal exposures regarding activities conducted by one group possibly affecting the other. For example, what happens if there is a search warrant or wire-tapping, etc. applied against one of the entities? By sharing such resources, is the second entity exposing itself to legal actions/problems encountered for any reason by the other? (for example, if some employee or volunteer at one entity violates copyrights, decides to use their platform to inject viruses onto the internet, etc. I would imagine that law enforcement would start by going after both entities in any investigation "because they are connected" and even if "found innocent" the second entity could face prohibitively expensive legal battles, lost time, possible confiscation of hardware and loss of data, and so on.)




You are giving helpful advice and thanks for sharing this...

http://cocoresolutions.com/


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