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  Heres a good story 
 
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ultma 076 Feb 25, 2013, 01:35am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Feb 27, 2013, 02:01am EST

Replies: 4 - Views: 1543
Friends compu stoped booting
would just hang with no beep code, hanging at VGA detection

tried another VGA (both were 8800GTS 512)

same thing

I then noticed the 8 pin psu plug had charing

when i pulled the plug the row of four pins closest to the cpu had all meted on the psu plug

i dug out the burntout plastic put in a cheap psu

and it went fine

the psu was a OCZ

700w

it was only powering 1 sata HDD a x4 945 and a 8800GTS 512

im amazed nothing else died and the fact it would still try and boot all fans spining etc cpu chassis and vga.

it woould post a beep code if the ram abd vga were removed aswell

haha close call


GA-EP45-DQ6
E8400 @4.00GHz (445*9) http://tinyurl.com/7xycyvo
4GB Gskill 1066 + 4GB Corsair 1066
Enermax whisper II 535W
GTX 560Ti ( This rig runs BF3 on Ultra :D )
Primary Display SyncMaster P2350 1080p
Secondary Dispaly 44" samsung LCD 1080p
WD
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~Vel Feb 25, 2013, 11:01pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Heres a good story
I would've freaked the f**k out.

Dr. Peaceful Mar 02, 2013, 10:06am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Heres a good story
The charring you described was likely caused by poor wiring of the power plug. Doesn't matter if the PSU is a quality one, if the pins in the power plug are poorly made, it could either cause a short, or a build up in resistance (and hence heat) due to poor conduction.

Another possibility is somehow the PSU is providing or the board is drawing up too much current to the plug. But since the problem seemed to be fixed once you change to another PSU, it probably more likely from the wiring instead.

ultma 076 Mar 03, 2013, 10:21pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Heres a good story
The psu was in service for a humber of years who knows how long this could of been happening

the melting was limited to the soft black plastic plug of the psu plus charing on the motehrboard connector (white probly higher qulity plastic with urea to prevent melting)

the metal connectors were fine and un affected

anyway i have never seen anything like that before

i am changing the mother board any way since the other psu dosent fit 100% into the 8pin slot since it was difficult to clean 100% of the debris out of the connector on the motherboard.

the not so good connection coupled with the debris and soot on the contatcts could cause the problem again


GA-EP45-DQ6
E8400 @4.00GHz (445*9) http://tinyurl.com/7xycyvo
4GB Gskill 1066 + 4GB Corsair 1066
Enermax whisper II 535W
GTX 560Ti ( This rig runs BF3 on Ultra :D )
Primary Display SyncMaster P2350 1080p
Secondary Dispaly 44" samsung LCD 1080p
WD
john albrich Mar 04, 2013, 07:33am EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Heres a good story
ultma 076 said:
...(white probly higher qulity plastic with urea to prevent melting)....


It's probably not the "quality", it's simply more likely the PSU connector's plastic formula is less resistant to high temperatures.

The ability to withstand heat isn't a "quality" factor, it's simply a thermoplastic's design point. One may have an extremely high-quality designed and manufactured connector that has a low temperature failure threshold. One also may have an extremely high-temperature resistant connector that is of poor quality design or manufacture.

For a chart of the temperature features of some common thermoplastics used in electronics, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoplastic


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