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  Adding third HDD to my setup 
 
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Nas Nas Apr 10, 2013, 11:09am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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My Dell e521 has 2 hard drive bays. It came with one HDD and I installed a second a few years later. I noticed when I installed the second drive that the motherboard has an extra port or input for the same type wire that connects to a HDD (I think it's SATA 2), I also have additional power cords that fit into a HDD.


The only thing is, there is no third HDD bay. However, there is plenty of space in the computer case, in the middle and there is also space for an additional cd drive where I could place the HDD.

Anyway I was wondering if I could use this spare input on my motherboard for adding a third HDD. I have an old one so it's not important if it's securely fitted or not and I probably wouldn't be using it permanently, just to transfer files from one drive to another.

I don't know if the fact that there are only two HDD bays is a limitation of the casing or if it means I shouldn't install a third one despite the input on the motherboard and available power outputs.


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john albrich Apr 10, 2013, 02:50pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
It's mostly going to be a PSU issue...whether or not the PSU supplies enough power. It likely does as energy efficient HDDs these days take less power than even HDDs did 2 years ago...in some cases the power requirements even in the same ballpark as SSD drives when writing/reading.

If you want things to be real tidy, then you can mount the new drive in the 5.25" bay by obtaining a 5.25" bay to 3.5" or 2.5" device mounting bracket...but it's certainly optional. Th e main problem with mounting in the 5.25" bay area in many cases is that it's difficult to provide added cooling up in that area of the case. However, you may not need additional cooling.

You can keep tabs on that by using HDD or SSD SMART temperature data from the drive(s). Most HDDs have a max operating temp of about 55C. SSDs usually have a slightly higher operating temp. But, if a drive(s) starts to run too hot, you may be able to add or improve cooling in the case.

Nas Nas Apr 11, 2013, 03:44am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 11, 2013, 04:40am EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Thanks. What I decided on was a 2tb Toshiba DT01ACA200 2TB Advanced Format drive. Based on your previous post to my other thread, I'm aware of the complications of cloning from a non AF to an AF drive (thanks again for that), so i thought i would take all my backup data from my 1tb backup drive and transfer it to the new drive, then clean the old backup (non AF) and clone my main drive into that drive instead.

First, I removed my backup drive in the extra bay and put the new drive in so I could quickly do a scan on it and make sure it works. Same connections and everything, but as soon as I start up I check My Compute but the new drive is not there. A quick look at "Device Manager" shows it's recognized, also using HDTune shows it but none of the SMART info like temperature, serial number and Health info which is usually present with newer drives.
I've tried disabling and re-enabling it, uninstalling and reinstalling as well as restarting the pc to make sure the bios settings for the sata ports are turned on. It still doesn't show up in the "My Computer" menu.

I thought maybe it had something to do with the port i was using so i remove it and put the old backup drive back in which works right away. I then shut it down and plug the new drive in the last spare sata port which was previously unoccupied and had never been set for anything. It starts up but it's still not there.

I've also tried Computer Management - Disk Management but it doesn't show up there either...


One final restart and check on the bios shows that it's recognized there as well but I still can't get it to show up where I can use it. I've even tried the folder options to show hidden drives and folders as well as empty drives but still I get nothing.


EDIT:

It seems my fading eyesight has contributed to me missing it on my first try, but after going over the same cycle again I was able to find the drive after going through the Disk management menu and scrolling down I found one labeled as unnamed disk or something like that which I have now clicked on and is recognized by the system.

HDTune wtill won't recognize the temperature and other info but I was able to find the serial number, which does not match what's on the hdd sticker and on the box. Not sure what to make of this...


.

john albrich Apr 11, 2013, 12:37pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 11, 2013, 12:46pm EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
If you're using an older OS and haven't already done so, you can try to make accommodations so that it can use the advanced format drive. It can be problematic at both the software and hardware level, and it can be dependent on the drive manufacturer. The age of the system BIOS might be an issue as well.
Here are some refs:
http://en.community.dell.com/techcenter/enterprise-client/w/wi...rives.aspx
http://www.bit-tech.net/hardware/storage/2010/04/01/the-facts-...rd-disks/2

I did take a look at the Dell e521manual, and it shows 4 perfectly usable SATA 3.0gbps ports...so it's likely either a drive or compatibility issue.
http://downloads.dell.com/Manuals/all-products/esuprt_desktop/..._en-us.pdf


edit to add: fixed HWA URL parsing issue by substituting %27 for an (apostrophe) in the link address

john albrich Apr 11, 2013, 12:56pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
One might wonder if Microsoft "invested" in the HDD manufacturers to "nudge" people to get winXP out of their machines so they must buy a new OS even though XP was working 100% OK for them and was doing everything their business needed it to do?

Going about it that way sounds like something progressives would do.

Naveen Goud Apr 11, 2013, 05:26pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Hi,

My suggestion is to not add the HDD as a third storage medium and instead use the HDD as an ext-hard drive.

In a generalized note, most of the PC manufactures from the past few years are offering PC's with two hard drives accommodating slots. They offer one HDD as default with the PC while purchase and provision enough compartmental space to add a second HDD in future.

If you can add a third hard drive in your present system, then it may cause various troubles like over heating, frequent shut down due to heat, restart troubles., boot up troubles and some times motherboard failure as well.

So, it is better you use the hard drive as a ext storage media, rather than inserting it into the PC.


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john albrich Apr 11, 2013, 06:51pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 11, 2013, 06:54pm EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Naveen Goud said:
...My suggestion is to not add the HDD as a third storage medium and instead use the HDD as an ext-hard drive.

In a generalized note, most of the PC manufactures from the past few years are offering PC's with two hard drives accommodating slots. They offer one HDD as default with the PC while purchase and provision enough compartmental space to add a second HDD in future.

If you can add a third hard drive in your present system, then it may cause various troubles like over heating, frequent shut down due to heat, restart troubles., boot up troubles and some times motherboard failure as well. ....


Naveen's suggestion which relies on his "generalized note"...doesn't apply in this particular instance. While it is wise to consider those general factors, the specific configuration details need to be evaluated when it comes time to an actual implementation.

If you look at the manual for the Dell E521 that I provided a link to, the system is designed with 4 SATA ports and 4 power plugs to support 4 drives. The case provides space for 2x 3.5" drives, and 2x 5.25" drives. If desired, the user can obtain a 3.5" to 5.25" bracket to facilitate mounting a 3.5" drive in the 5.25" space...a common situation. For example:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811993004

Unless Nas added additional power-hungry hardware (like a newer video card) it is unlikely this particular system cannot handle the power and cooling requirements of the 3 HDDs (and the original CD/DVD drive assuming he left it installed).

The newer HDD likely even takes less +12V and +5V power than would have many second (optional) CD-ROM drives available from a few years ago (which is when the E521 was sold).

IF there is overheating of the HDD, it can be handled with either an auxiliary HDD cooler or by the user finding some other method of providing better airflow in the 5.25" bays.

I believe in this situation my post at http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/78620/#597081 is more applicable.


edit: change ref to "my last post" and provided a hyperlink, as I realized I'd snarked at Microsoft in my actual "last" post in this thread.

john albrich Apr 11, 2013, 07:10pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
In case you're not aware, be sure to use appropriate ESD handling protocols and power-removal protocols when dealing with an open case and handling any components whether or not they are connected.

As ONE example of power protocols...before installing/removing parts from a computer, remove the AC power plug from the PSU...don't just rely on the front panel switch to remove power. Your user manual should provide more details on both these exposures, but if not you can search the internet or this website for more info.

Nas Nas Apr 11, 2013, 09:04pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 11, 2013, 09:06pm EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Thanks for all the additional input guys. I still don't fully understand the AF info you gave me about cloning drives so it may take me a while to get to the new links :D I have a new corsaire 400w psu and I'm only running an entry level radeon 5450 GPU so it should be fine. I've opened up the additional 5.25'' bay and put the drive there padded with enough foam to on the bottom to keep it safe and stable but not so much that it gets in the way of the airflow. I'll go look out for some permanent fixtures later today.

The drive is up and running, I've been scanning it on HDTune and I'm a little worried about the results as there seem to be a lot of random spikes which resemble the same worn 6 year old HDD I have. Not being too sure of how to read or interpret these graphs in the first place, I was hoping you could have a look:

The first one is the only "good" scan I've got
http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii207/pistolero983/11-April...5fb892.png

these next three are how an average scan looks.
http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii207/pistolero983/11-April...83ede7.png

http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii207/pistolero983/11-April...86da9b.png

http://i265.photobucket.com/albums/ii207/pistolero983/12-April...14d114.png

I usually scan my drives and I've never had a new one have results like this. Hopefully it's not indicative of any problem, shops here don't allow any exchange until something has gone wrong...


One more question, I'm still not sure why things like temperature and SMART info don't show up on HDTune since it's supposed to be a SMART drive. I don't know if this is an error or has to do with my version of HDTune (5.0) not being compatible with AF?



john albrich Apr 12, 2013, 04:24am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Nas Nas said:
...The drive is up and running, I've been scanning it on HDTune and I'm a little worried about the results as there seem to be a lot of random spikes which resemble the same worn 6 year old HDD I have. Not being too sure of how to read or interpret these graphs in the first place, I was hoping you could have a look:
The first one is the only "good" scan I've got. I usually scan my drives and I've never had a new one have results like this. Hopefully it's not indicative of any problem, shops here don't allow any exchange until something has gone wrong....

I've never used HDTune on an AFdrive on an older OS, so can't speak directly to it, but those scans don't look that bad, especially if you're using an older OS...in which unpredictable performance problems have been reported to show-up. I wouldn't be too concerned about those graphs at this point in time.

It's possible what you're seeing is the result of various "performance problems" users have reported AF drives have when used with an older OS (in Windows that would be anything pre-Vista). They don't look like any graphs I've seen from drives that have media or data management errors. In my experience, when those have problems, the HDTune output tends to show much sharper "spike" shapes and shorter lasting (narrower "spikes"). But, it may exhibit the similar frequencies of occurrence as the more rounded shapes you're seeing.

To be safe, do some in-depth scans preferably using both a read-only and then a read/write mode. If you can use a disk tool that doesn't run via Windows but produces similar tests, a comparison could be instructive.

One thing I do find encouraging is that your performance degradation is almost "flat" for half the drive, and only then begins to rapidly degrade. My experience is that performance tends to begin to quickly degrade at about the 20 to 30% point on the physical media. However, keep in mind this could be the reported result if there is a throughput measurement algorithm difference in the newer version of HDtune or that you're using HDTune Pro (I use the freeware versoin), instead of an actual difference in the performance difference profile because it is an AF drive.
====================================================================

Nas Nas said:
...One more question, I'm still not sure why things like temperature and SMART info don't show up on HDTune since it's supposed to be a SMART drive. I don't know if this is an error or has to do with my version of HDTune (5.0) not being compatible with AF?
I'm assuming you've verified SMART data is enabled and you do get correct SMART data from the other drives, both without and with the new HDD connected. Proceeding on that assumption, try using some different SMART tools (speedfan, Disk Checkup, HDDscan, the HDD manufacturer's utility, etc). Even on "standard" HDDs I've seen HDD diagnostics be unable to access and/or properly report SMART and/or temp data, while other diagnostics programs report these data as expected.

Another Test To Consider:
If you can borrow a copy of Win7, I'd try a temporary install of Win7 on the new HDD itself as the new system drive, as we "know" it should work without any special user gymnastics.

Disconnect your old HDDs to prevent any mistakes before you do that. This will also keep the configuration simple.

See if you can get local things working OK using the new drive under Win7. Don't mess with any networks at this point. Again, we're keeping things simple.

You don't need to register the Win7 installation just to run some tests for a few days. You've got a 30 day window where you have fully functional Win7 without registration.

If you can't run the AF drive properly under Win7, then I'd suspect either a drive problem or a BIOS problem. In other words, from what we know, Win7 should natively support the AF drive, and Win7 compatible utilities like HDtune) should work properly running under Win7. See where I'm heading with this?


(note: I'm probably rambling more than usual as I'm once again on the max dosage of my pain meds today. Let me know if you need something clarified.)

Nas Nas Apr 13, 2013, 01:37am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Thanks for another very thorough explanation. No clarification needed on your input, but I do have a follow up question or two based on my being a perpetual noob when it comes to this stuff. I've tried looking up more on AF drives and running HD Tune and other programs but not much info yet. Anyway, one other thing I noticed on HD tune is that it shows the drive to have 512mb sector size instead of the 4k sectors I thought AF drives were supposed to have so this just adds to the confusion. I don't know if that means HD tune doesn't work or isn't calibrated to run with AF drives or maybe this isn't an AF drive despite what it says on the packaging?


I'm already running win7 on my main drive, I know you mentioned and provided links about issues with cloning non AF to an AF drive but what about using one as a backup like I am? I would like to try and install it on the drive to test it as you suggested, but I currently can't locate my win7 installation disk, so for now all I have are the HD tune scans which may or may not be accurate but I have them to compare to each other. I'm relieved to see your input on them, I'll compare the readings I have to ones I take in the next couple of days and hopefully they don't get any worse.

Btw, I don't run any programs when I scan the drives, but I still don't know what that means in relation to the spikes. Also, I don't know if this means anything but on a lot of my scans that show mostly different results for the first and middle parts, I have about six or so where the final parts (From around 1600gb to 2000gb) on each scan match each other almost exactly.

Nas Nas Apr 14, 2013, 09:59am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 14, 2013, 10:07am EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup

john albrich Apr 17, 2013, 07:02am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 17, 2013, 07:13am EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
I see you're also trying to resolve your HD Tune "spikes" concerns on yahoo since 4 days ago, but haven't received any responses.
http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20130413080548AAslvKo


Since Advanced Format drives are something we're all being forced into, I've still been looking into that and other issues you've reported in this thread. I don't have specific answers for you, but do have more thoughts and information I think is applicable. We've all got a dog in this hunt.


Re: Your report that you still can't see hard drive SMART data on your Toshiba drive even when attached to an internal SATA port...
This could be an issue with the SATA subsystem/firmware on your older system. It may or not be resolvable if Dell offers motherboard firmware updates. (However, keep in mind that attempting to flash the motherboard may "brick" the motherboard, so in my opinion this is a last resort that should be attempted only if you are prepared to replace the motherboard and it is possible to do so.) If you can't get SMART data on the Toshiba Advanced Format drive from ANY other newer system (manufactured within the past year), AND trying multiple other applications that support and should report SMART data, then I'd try to return the drive as possibly defective. However, the drive retailer/manufacturer may or may not agree with you. (A reminder: make sure hard drive SMART reporting is enabled in BIOS/UEFI settings for each system in which you test the drive.)


Re: your earlier statement on HD Tune reported sector size:
Nas Nas said: ...one other thing I noticed on HD tune is that it shows the drive to have 512mb sector size instead of the 4k sectors I thought AF drives were supposed to have so this just adds to the confusion. I don't know if that means HD tune doesn't work or isn't calibrated to run with AF drives or maybe this isn't an AF drive despite what it says on the packaging?

I don't know which "category/generation" your Toshiba drive falls into, but if it is in the "first" category described by the overclockersclub article, this might explain why HD Tune is reporting 512 instead of 4K as you stated in your quoted post. Keep in mind we also don't know how low-level HD Tune performs each test, and that would definitely affect reported test results.
From webpage http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/barracuda_green_2tb/
There are three categories for generation one drives.
-The first is 512 emulation (512e) which the drive had 4K physical sectors but translate them into 512 bytes for the host.
-The second is Native 4K (4Kn) which has the physical 4K sectors on the drive which are reported as 4K sectors to the host.
-The last configuration is 4K Read Host (Client devices only) which is a host system which works equally well with older 512 and 512e disk drives. Seagate is taking this new technology a bit further with their own Smart Align design which keeps data aligned together for faster access and read/write times."



re: Unaligned v. Aligned
There apparently can be a performance impact as much as 5X reduction when drive is NOT aligned...even apparently in SOME configurations that use Win7 which is supposed to natively support it. This is based on this webpage I found of interest regarding OS, one's intended usage, and whether the WD Align Utility is required/helpful. See the upper right half of the page and input applicable parameters to examine the differences.
http://www.wdc.com/en/products/products.aspx?id=150


Re: HD Tune and Advanced Format drives in general...
From the overclockersclub.com website (and others), we at least can deduce that HD Tune apparently is able to test Advanced Format drives (e.g. the Seagate and WD AF drives tested). But, keep in mind that HD Tune doesn't explicitly state it supports all hard drives. So, your specific Toshiba drive may exhibit issues with HD Tune that other drives do not. I'd also keep in mind that the various software and OS interactions may make any results from any arbitrary benchmark program unreliable. See also the info below regarding HD Tune NOT specifically stipulating it supports Advanced Format drives.
http://www.overclockersclub.com/reviews/barracuda_green_2tb/3.htm
in which it is stated they also tested a "Western Digital WD20EARS Advanced Format drive"

We do see from these webpages,
http://www.hdtune.com/
http://www.hdtune.com/index.html
Going back as far as 2008 (Pro ver. 3.10) HD Tune website does NOT SPECIFICALLY state it supports Advanced Format drives, although it is inferred by a non-exclusive statement
"Hardware requirements: hard disk (internal or external), SDD, USB stick, memory card reader."
and further SUGGESTS this support is provided with notes on the November 2011 update to ver 5.0
-Random access
* maximum access time is shown
* added 4 KB align option
-Extra tests
* added random seek 4 KB test
* added 4 KB align option
But, again, keep in mind what I said above regarding how low-level the testing is in various HD Tune tests, and the "category" statement from overclockersclub.com I quoted above would affect test results.


Re: HD Tune support for externally attached hard drives...
http://www.hdtune.com/download.html
HD Tune Pro supports SMART for externally attached drives.
HD Tune (regular) does NOT support SMART on external drives. (I assume this must refer to USB attached and not eSATA directly attached)
But, your post indicates you installed the new drive internally on SATA port previously used with the non-Advanced Format drive, so that restriction wouldn't apply even if HD Tund Pro did not claim to support SMART on externally attached drives. (I'm just affirming all the issues, here.)

HD Tune (standard and Pro) both stipulate.
"Note: due to hardware limitations some drives may not support all functions."
No more details are provided.


Re: HD Tune reported "spikes" in performance graphs...
Could the "spikes" indicate drive problems? Yes. However, I've had drives for over 3 years that produce MUCH worse "spikes" in HD Tune that show no evidence of failures or predicted failures (using HD Tune and other applications (e.g. "speedfan", Passmark's "diskcheckup", etc). There may be some underlying performance "hiccups" but nothing I've noticed at the user level. Unfortunately, you apparently at this time can't access the SMART data, which could provide more detailed information on internal failures (e.g. retries, reassigned sectors, etc) indicating this is or isn't a major problem. I've read reports that neither retailers nor the drive manufacturers recognize drives with these reported "spikes" as defective unless accompanied by hard data showing lots of reassigned sectors, etc. They generally disallow refund/replacement based solely on soft and/or recoverable errors.


http://www.majorgeeks.com/Passmark_DiskCheckup_d3464.html
(provides guideline TEC predictions about future failure dates)

http://www.majorgeeks.com/SpeedFan_d337.html
(compares your disk data to real-time database of other users' real-world disk SMART data (when available))

Nas Nas Apr 21, 2013, 08:45pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
Thanks so much for the follow up. Lol, yeah,I asked on yahoo as well as I usually do so I can get as much info as I can in order to be able to decide on how to handle it. I had a busy week and I didn't know if I was going to have to go back and deal with the hassle of returning and explaining it.

I skimmed through your additional info last week and it seems to make sense as far as I can understand. I did download some other utilities and the info shows up in one of them, Crystal Disk Info seems to show all the data, not that it helps since I don't understand any of it anyway, but it's there.

The scans seem to have settled down a bit. I learned that even switching from the HDtune application to an already opened window to the can cause spikes when scanning my new drive. Weird since when I scan my older drive, also connected by SATA doesn't have spikes like this even when I run webpages or even open video's while doing a benchmark.

The one thing now that I can't seem to figure out myself is the Crystal Disk benchmark for the same drive on an online review, shows sequential write speeds of up to 144MB/s while mine don't seem to match being slightly slower at 131MB/s and also slower on all other tests on the same program. HD Tune benchmarks on other reviews are also significantly higher than the 117MB/s maximum I get for the read rate, it's usually around 113-115MB/s on mine while reviews show 150MB/s or higher. I only just noticed these figures last week since I was fixated on the spikes. The read rate on my older seagate is also 150+MB/s through the same type SATA connection. I'm sure it's nothing serious though.

Thanks again for all your detailed explanations.

john albrich Apr 21, 2013, 10:10pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Apr 27, 2013, 05:20am EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
Since the benchmark provided by HD Tune appears to be at the PC interface level (not at a low level within the drive), it should be expected to be different for different systems, OS's, drivers, applications running, processes and services running, etc. CPU and memory subsystem speeds would contribute as well. As in your case, such differences could be substantial from one system to the next.

Even HD Tune's "Test Speed vs. Accuracy" setting impacts the results. That's a good indicator that reported performance is dependent on things going on at the system level and isn't dependent on just the drive.

For more understanding of the SMART attributes, check out:
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/77840/#592852
in particular, the reference to the http://kb.acronis.com reference. Note that some SMART attributes can have extremely poor ratings (e.g. "imminent" failure) and yet NOT affect the instantaneous performance of the drive at all (e.g. power-on hours, spin-up time, etc).


edit to add:
Changing HD Tune's "Block Size" setting can also affect reported performance in a HUGE way. This will likely involve things such as the HDD's cache size, how many processors it has, how it manages interleaving, etc etc. For example on one HDD on the system I'm using right now, running HD Tune with a Block Size=2MB yields a maximum performance of about 100MB/sec. However, if I change it to Block Size=4KB, the maximum performance drops down to about 15MB/sec. That's almost an order of magnitude 10x reduction. Different configurations and drives will behave differently. I assume reviewers would manually optimize this setting for their given configuration and specific HDD that's being tested when producing their performance results.

edit to add:
I forgot to mention that if the HDD supports NCQ, then whether or not NCQ is enabled and functional (unfortunately this is not just a simple UEFI/BIOS Setting checkbox) can make a big difference in some performance tests and also could explain differences between review numbers and your personal results. (NCQ=Native Command Queueing and can improve performance significantly)

john albrich Apr 27, 2013, 05:59am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Jun 29, 2013, 12:58pm EDT

 
>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
Found an article that covers many of the Advanced Format HDD issues in reasonably easy to understand language with diagrams.
http://www.seagate.com/tech-insights/advanced-format-4k-sector...master-ti/

I also just found out that most Advanced Format HDDs have the AF logo on the label. Looking at the pictures supplied on a retailer's website may be the best way to easily determine whether or not the drive is AF, even if the website and retailer-provided specifications don't explicitly state it is an Advanced Format HDD.

The AF logo is just the letters "AF" enclosed in an almost square outline box with ONE rounded corner (the upper left).


edit to add:
Some Western Digital drives that I have don't show the AF logo on the drive label, but they do stipulate on the drive label that the drive is "Advanced Format" in fairly tiny letters.

john albrich Jun 29, 2013, 12:55pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Adding third HDD to my setup
.
Re: effect of system-level events on the reliability of HD Tune reports...

Just remembered, another thing you can do that can reduce (but not entirely eliminate) the magnitude of system-level events interference on HD Tune performance metrics is to go to the Options>Benchmark settings of HD Tune and set the "accuracy" slider for maximum accuracy. Also set the Block Size option to a fixed value like 2MB (optimum results can vary depending on configuration). You should see some reduction in the larger anomalous downward "spikes" and an evening-out of the other performance variations.


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