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  Corsair CX600 issue? 
 
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Benny Oseguera Mar 07, 2014, 07:56pm EST Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Everytime I am doing something on an intense load, the computer would reboot with no bluescreen,warning, etc. An example of intense load would be me playing Battlefield 4.

My specs:
Cpu: I5-3570k
Gpu: Gtx 760
Psu: Corsair Cx600
Mobo: Gigabyte-B75M-D3H
RAM: (Stock) 8gb
HDD : 1TB
Chassis: Thermaltake Commander MS-I Edition

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Reason   Mar 10, 2014, 12:26pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
That certainly sounds like a PSU issue, or at least, it sounds exactly like an issue I had back in the day with a 450w rosewill that would do the same thing under certain graphically intense situations in HL2. Went away when I upgraded the PSU.

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Benny Oseguera Mar 10, 2014, 11:06pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
But it's new and it's a damn Corsair -.- such "quality".

Meats_Of_Evil Mar 11, 2014, 11:44am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 11, 2014, 11:48am EDT

 
>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
You can get a lemon from any manufacturer even if its quality. If it's new you should rma it or replace it in the store asap. Though the only sure way to test if the faulty component is the PSU is to use another one and see if the problem persists.

Also, just in case you were thinking about buying a PSU tester I would save my money if I were you since from experience, PSU testers do not put any load on the PSU so you can't really be sure of anything unless the PSU is absolute crap and doesn't provide the appropriate voltage.

*Edit*

As far as lemons go, I have a Netgear N900 (WNDR4500) and given the rave reviews you would think it would be a quality router but oh man, was I unlucky! The damn thing would restart and crap out on the internet every few days and the lag in games was horrendous. Even after days of adjusting every setting on the router and re-reading the entire manual 2 to 3 times and playing with every settings on the QoS the thing would just suck. I now have the most expensive Access Point I've ever bought. One thing it was good at was with signal range.

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Everything I write is Sarcasm.
john albrich Mar 11, 2014, 02:05pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 11, 2014, 02:34pm EDT

 
>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
.
Also check your CPU and GPU temperatures. Use an app (program) that either logs them or displays them in a 'real-time' chart so you can see how temps vary with usage.

Make sure your cooling fans are spinning at appropriate speeds (e.g. typically as CPU gets hotter, the fan should spin faster, etc). If they aren't already doing so, try forcing all the cooling fans to run at 100% RPMs for maximum cooling (e.g. direct connect to 12VDC or use fan control software to force 100% RPMs). See if the increased cooling changes the symptoms. Programs like OpenHardwareMonitor can help in both fan/temp monitoring and fan RPM control of system, CPU, and GPU fans.
http://openhardwaremonitor.org/
http://www.majorgeeks.com/files/details/open_hardware_monitor.html

On the other hand, I've had 4 ~700W class OCZ 'Xtreme'-series PSUs exhibit power stability issues, including two that were intermittently 'glitching' and dropping +3.3V rail to ~1.2V and +12V rails to ~10V for milli-seconds at a time, which are definitely out of spec and could cause symptoms such as yours. These highly intermittent (and possibly load dependent) 'glitches' are NOT detected by the 'go/no-go' simple PSU testers one sees for about $15-$30. They report the PSU was 'OK'.
Also, depending on motherboard power regulator design and subsystem using the specific voltage rail, this may or may not show any symptoms during operation. Eventually 2 of the PSUs died completely, including 1 OCZ700SXS 'StealthXtreme' model that had been RMA'd and factory modified for a previous known design/manufacturing defect.

john albrich Mar 11, 2014, 02:29pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Mar 11, 2014, 02:31pm EDT

 
>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
Meats_Of_Evil said:
...Also, just in case you were thinking about buying a PSU tester I would save my money if I were you since from experience, PSU testers do not put any load on the PSU so you can't really be sure of anything unless the PSU is absolute crap and doesn't provide the appropriate voltage....


I completely agree the go/no-go PSU testers don't diagnose a number of PSU operational failures.

However, they CAN save diagnostic time and prevent major damage to hardware when all it takes is 30 seconds to check the PSU for gross failures (like out-of-spec DC levels, power-good signal timing, and so on). Using a dirt-cheap tester can save a lot of time in those situations.

Being careful and doing redundant testing HAS saved me money and time in time-critical situations.

Many here at HWA have probably figured out I'm very aggressive at minimizing exposing costly equipment to potential sources of damage; real-time and latent. Hence...
I also always test a PSU (and all its connectors) with one of these cheap testers before connecting it to a motherboard..even if it is a PSU I 'know' was good last time I used it. It's not a guarantee, but doing this has pre-screened-out many bad PSUs.

I also then connect to a cheap 'known-good' 'throw-away' motherboard with display and various 'throw-away' peripherals, and boot it up to do a second test to reduce the chance of destroying a very expensive motherboard. Only after these two tests (relatively cheap if something goes wrong) do I actually put a previously known//unknown/new PSU into a system that is important to me or others.

note: a 'throw-away' device is simply one that I don't care if it's damaged/destroyed. It's likely one that I've salvaged from somewhere, and costs me next to nothing if it's destroyed.

Benny Oseguera Mar 11, 2014, 06:42pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Corsair CX600 issue?
I can assure you that temps are no issue. I just installed an EVO 212 on my Cpu and my temps are under 65C. The Gpu temps don't even reach 80C before the computer reboots.


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