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  Which of thses two brands of RAM is better? 
 
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Calvin Cutts Aug 26, 2014, 08:32am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Hi, could someone tell me please what is the better of these two RAMs please.

Corsair Vengeance Pro
http://www.corsair.com/en-gb/vengeance-pro-series-16gb-2-x-8gb...2a2400c10r

G-Skill TridentX
http://www.gskill.com/en/product/f3-2400c10d-16gtx


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TamTheBam Aug 26, 2014, 11:20am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Which of thses two brands of RAM is better?

....I'm back, but only as a part-timer... :)
john albrich Aug 26, 2014, 04:16pm EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Which of thses two brands of RAM is better?
.
In GENERAL my personal experience has been that Corsair has been marginally more reliable then GSkill when used at standard rated voltages and timings, and I've sometimes had difficulty overclocking some GSkill modules above rated speeds by any significant amount regardless in which motherboard I've used them.

However, you need to keep in mind that the RAM I was using at that time didn't make the claim to overclock to the extremely high frequencies both these RAM sets are claiming. Since both these are claiming 2400MHz (but spec'd at 1333MHz) differences in overclocking may not be as significant an issue.

You also want to keep in mind that depending on how many cores your CPU has, you may be able to get superior performance out of 4x4GB modules instead of 2x8GB modules. That is motherboard and CPU dependent and of course if you're not running with a 64bit OS anything above 4GB Total RAM is wasted money.

Now, on to nitty-gritty stuff.

It depends on what you actually mean by "better"...
what your goals are...what you're trying to do...what your system can do
(e.g. does BIOS/UEFI provide the flexibility to do what you intend to do in terms of adjusting RAM timings and voltages and if necessary depending on motherboard also the CPU and Northbridge voltages, and so on?) What the motherboard firmware lets you do is critical to successful and meaningful overclocking.

Or...IF you have a huge CPU cooler will that reduce overclocking on the GSkill Trident modules? (because in that case you might have to remove the RAM modules' clip-on cooling fin(s) (aka heat-spreader) so the RAM can physically fit) and so on.

And, it all can change depending on how many modules you're using and the mode they're being used in.

...but once you overclock all reliability statements and assessments become relative and not absolute (for example, overclocking in my system with the motherboard and cooling I use may be 100% reliable but in someone else's system the SAME RAM might not be as reliable when overclocked by the same amount...because of lower cooling or less precise motherboard voltage regulation for the RAM, CPU, or Northbridge).

BOTH sets high-speed claims mean operating at 1.65V (and therefore running hotter), but operating at lower speeds (e.g. 1333MHz) they'll work at 1.5Volts.

If the color clip-ons for the "Vengeance" are plastic, then if overclocking I would NOT install the clip-ons at all as it seems to me the plastic would actually disrupt and therefore degrade cooling to some degree. Whereas the metal heat-"spreader" clip-on for the GSkill "Trident" seems like a good idea IF they will fit in your system with the CPU cooler you use.

Naveen Goud Sep 01, 2014, 02:00am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Which of thses two brands of RAM is better?
Hi,

I have personally used Corsair 8GB and so would vote for 16GB one based on my past experience.

I don't have any experience about G-Skill and even never heard of it from anyone. So, would certainly chose Corsair.

Company: http://www.stonefly.com

Facebook:http://www.facebook.com/stoneflyinc

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Calvin Cutts Sep 01, 2014, 03:54am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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Edited: Sep 01, 2014, 03:54am EDT

 
>> Re: Which of thses two brands of RAM is better?
john albrich said:
.
In GENERAL my personal experience has been that Corsair has been marginally more reliable then GSkill when used at standard rated voltages and timings, and I've sometimes had difficulty overclocking some GSkill modules above rated speeds by any significant amount regardless in which motherboard I've used them.

However, you need to keep in mind that the RAM I was using at that time didn't make the claim to overclock to the extremely high frequencies both these RAM sets are claiming. Since both these are claiming 2400MHz (but spec'd at 1333MHz) differences in overclocking may not be as significant an issue.

You also want to keep in mind that depending on how many cores your CPU has, you may be able to get superior performance out of 4x4GB modules instead of 2x8GB modules. That is motherboard and CPU dependent and of course if you're not running with a 64bit OS anything above 4GB Total RAM is wasted money.

Now, on to nitty-gritty stuff.

It depends on what you actually mean by "better"...
what your goals are...what you're trying to do...what your system can do
(e.g. does BIOS/UEFI provide the flexibility to do what you intend to do in terms of adjusting RAM timings and voltages and if necessary depending on motherboard also the CPU and Northbridge voltages, and so on?) What the motherboard firmware lets you do is critical to successful and meaningful overclocking.

Or...IF you have a huge CPU cooler will that reduce overclocking on the GSkill Trident modules? (because in that case you might have to remove the RAM modules' clip-on cooling fin(s) (aka heat-spreader) so the RAM can physically fit) and so on.

And, it all can change depending on how many modules you're using and the mode they're being used in.

...but once you overclock all reliability statements and assessments become relative and not absolute (for example, overclocking in my system with the motherboard and cooling I use may be 100% reliable but in someone else's system the SAME RAM might not be as reliable when overclocked by the same amount...because of lower cooling or less precise motherboard voltage regulation for the RAM, CPU, or Northbridge).

BOTH sets high-speed claims mean operating at 1.65V (and therefore running hotter), but operating at lower speeds (e.g. 1333MHz) they'll work at 1.5Volts.

If the color clip-ons for the "Vengeance" are plastic, then if overclocking I would NOT install the clip-ons at all as it seems to me the plastic would actually disrupt and therefore degrade cooling to some degree. Whereas the metal heat-"spreader" clip-on for the GSkill "Trident" seems like a good idea IF they will fit in your system with the CPU cooler you use.


I have an i7 4770K overclocked to 4.4ghz. Would 4x4gb be better then 2x8? And all I'll be doing is loading up the XMP preset in the RAM.

john albrich Sep 01, 2014, 07:05am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Re: Which of thses two brands of RAM is better?
Calvin Cutts said:
I have an i7 4770K overclocked to 4.4ghz. Would 4x4gb be better then 2x8? And all I'll be doing is loading up the XMP preset in the RAM.


If you don't want to study a lot more about memory management, and research your hardware, firmware, and software, then you already have 2 votes for Corsair over GSkill.

As for (a)x(b)GBconfiguration...go with what your hardware and budget allow, and any plans for expansion or using the memory in future platforms you may have. However, regardless of any technical merits in your specific implementation one way or the other, I suspect for whatever reasons you'll always be subjectively "what if" wary of the 4x4GB configuration and will end up being happier just "going with" 2x8GB.
------

I had hoped that if you were that committed to overclocking optimization, that my original post would be sufficient to get you to do a LOT more self-study about overclocking and memory management for your specific implementation. It can be rewarding in a faster and reliable machine and simply the accomplishment of doing so. Simple internet searches can identify tutorials and fora in which these are discussed in much more detail than I could possibly discuss here.

A lot of other people already have done a lot of work to help people in this area and you need to take advantage of that existing knowledge and expertise.
------

Memory overclocking can be very challenging. I'm sorry to say it's not simple, and it's not instantly learned. It'a a very complex subject and depends a lot on exactly what hardware you have up to and including memory module base voltage, whether the memory modules are tested as a "kit", whether the motherboard manufacturer specifically supports them, and much more. (note: while normally buying multiple modules as a "kit" is not absolutely required to work at the specified base frequency and voltage, it may make a difference on some motherboards and/or when overclocking, especially if manufacturer rates the tested "kit" at the desired overclock speeds and voltages).

For example, I indicated it can depend on the motherboard as well. Some motherboards (e.g. Intel x79 series) allow "quad" channel memory mode, which may provide some performance gain using 4x4GB modules over using just 2x8GB modules. However, other factors are involved besides just hardware and firmware factors, including whether the programs you plan to use can even make use of quad-channel memory management benefits.

In some cases, the performance gain is so minimal it may make more sense reliability-wise simply to go with 2 modules. That may produce less stress on the memory subsystem than 4 modules. But again, even that decision strictly speaking depends on things like the modules, voltages, etc. Reliability considerations are also affected when just simple number of modules is considered: 4 modules generally less reliable than 2 identical modules. Fewer parts generally means lower probability of failure. Yet an arbitrary 1x8GB memory module's memory chips may have higher density memory cell process and thus may be less reliable than arbitrary 2x4GB modules as higher density process means less room for error in the manufacturing process. On the other hand, lower density memory chips generally create less waste heat than higher density chips, so cooling becomes more imporant. Then again, the 4GB memory module's memory chips may use the same density manufacturing process and there may be no difference in reliability on the process basis alone. Notice how many times I used the word may?

john albrich Sep 04, 2014, 08:43am EDT Reply - Quote - Report Abuse
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>> Motherboard RAM Support
.
Since you haven't yet ID'd your motherboard, an extra warning may help.

You need to make sure whatever RAM module size you purchase is supported by your motherboard. While we might assume you know this, we all know what assumptions can do.

Many motherboards do NOT support 8GB RAM modules, including some of the newer boards (that keeps the manufacturing cost down, and it's more true for micro-ATX and economy motherboards)


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