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  Math Question Like really really hard question 
 
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Tyler Fenske Dec 16, 2004, 09:36pm EST Report Abuse
Ok well my math tacher has this calendar on which he puts like questions that the answers equals the date. On todays (the 16th) he had this

15 + 1/2 + 1/4 + 1/8 + 1/16 + 1/32 + 1/64 + 1/128 so on and so forth for ever


My question is Will the answer ever get close enough to 16 that it will equal 16.


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Tyler Fenske
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Greg M Dec 16, 2004, 11:47pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Its 1/2 a parabola... it will never quite reach 16.

We once had a lengthly discussion in my math class about 1.999999999999 repeating.... and had to figure out what it was....

After much deliberation we decided it was 2. because 1.33333333 repeating is 1 1/3 and 1.6666666 repeating is 1 2/3 so 1.9999999 repeating must me 1 3/3 or 2.

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Tyler Fenske Dec 16, 2004, 11:51pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Yes we had like the same discussion but we proved it mathmatically, and i need an answer that says it is not equal to 16 cause then i get candy. :)
Well I think it would get close to .999999999999......... but never actually get there.

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Tyler Fenske
Mr. Aveng Dec 17, 2004, 12:37am EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Yeah, it will never equal 16. It will b so infinetely close to 16 that u can say it's 16, maybe ur calculator even will, but it will never b equal to 16. Just 15.9999999999999999999999 repeating infinitely.

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Rhort Dec 17, 2004, 04:24am EST Report Abuse
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Bob Smith Dec 17, 2004, 08:04am EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Yea, the word you're looking for is asymptotic, the line woould be asymptotic about 16, meaning it would always be approaching 16 but would never actually reach it, except in the case where x = infinity.

Diablos Dec 17, 2004, 12:37pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
I suppose the answer should be 16 - 1^(inf)x(-1). That's 16 minus 1 raised to power infinity multiplied by -1. :)

Predator Dec 17, 2004, 04:25pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question

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Tyler Fenske Dec 17, 2004, 04:34pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Ya its geometry but its not a quetion for the class, it's a like just a question that came up.

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Tyler Fenske
Bob Smith Dec 17, 2004, 06:10pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
Favourite maths topic is topology....ever seen a one sided piece of paper? I touched on it when I did maths at A level, but since then I haven't really studied it at an academic level, just as a personal interest. It's in that great zome of mathematics where it's impossible to differentiate it from philosophy. Kinda miss it- no room for that sort of stuff in an engineering degree :(


John Warner Dec 17, 2004, 06:38pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
yer asymptotic, your never going to reach it.

Yay for engineering degrees btw... mine starts next year

tom riddle Jan 07, 2005, 12:24am EST Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
There was a steel beam 50 feet long. The entire construction crew (total weight: 6000 pounds) was standing at the center of the beam. Assume the modulus of elasticity is 29,000,000 pounds per square inch, the moment of inertia is 850 inches^4, the beam has simple pin connections at either end, and all loads other than the weight of the crew are disregarded.

How much will the beam deflect? Please round to the nearest tenth of an inch.


Louis Stron Sep 10, 2011, 11:13pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
yes,the answer is 16

Louis Stron Sep 11, 2011, 07:28am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
the terms after 15 goes on to infinty and ratio decrases the term by 1/2 and using the sum formula a/(1-r) the sum is one.

Dublin_Gunner Sep 13, 2011, 05:08am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
tom riddle said:
There was a steel beam 50 feet long. The entire construction crew (total weight: 6000 pounds) was standing at the center of the beam. Assume the modulus of elasticity is 29,000,000 pounds per square inch, the moment of inertia is 850 inches^4, the beam has simple pin connections at either end, and all loads other than the weight of the crew are disregarded.

How much will the beam deflect? Please round to the nearest tenth of an inch.



Pounds? feet? Inches?? I don't understand.

Us European's deal in logical weights and measures :P

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john albrich Sep 13, 2011, 07:57am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
tom riddle said:
There was a steel beam 50 feet long. The entire construction crew (total weight: 6000 pounds) was standing at the center of the beam. Assume the modulus of elasticity is 29,000,000 pounds per square inch, the moment of inertia is 850 inches^4, the beam has simple pin connections at either end, and all loads other than the weight of the crew are disregarded.
How much will the beam deflect? Please round to the nearest tenth of an inch.


a) The entire beam is deflected 0.0 inches because it's lying on a perfectly flat relatively non-deformable ground surface in a uniform gravity field at a uniform temperature of 25C.

b) The entire beam is deflected 0.0 inches because the center of the beam is at Earth-Sol L1.

c) The entire beam is deflected 0.0 inches because the suspension mechanism (not being mentioned in the problem) has apparently detached from the pins and the beam and all objects in contact with the beam are now plummeting to the ground at about the same speed.

d) This answer assumes a typical construction-grade iron/carbon-content steel beam suspended by cables attached to the pins as in a typical construction environment.
The entire beam is deflected 0.0 inches because Coyote (Carnivorous vulgaris) has a powerful Acme electro-magnet situated some fixed distance above the mid-point of the beam with field-strength varied by active-feedback as needed such that it continuously offsets the vertical deflection that would otherwise be observed in the assumed environment. (Caution: do not wear steel-toed boots and low-carbon steel belt-buckles while conducting this experiment.)


edit:
added item "d)" to the list

Meats_Of_Evil Sep 13, 2011, 12:49pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
^^^^ROFLMAOCAKEWTFBBQ!!! ^^


lol nice one john

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Dr. Peaceful Sep 14, 2011, 04:40pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question

Dr. Peaceful Sep 14, 2011, 05:28pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Math Question Like really really hard question
tom riddle said:
There was a steel beam 50 feet long. The entire construction crew (total weight: 6000 pounds) was standing at the center of the beam. Assume the modulus of elasticity is 29,000,000 pounds per square inch, the moment of inertia is 850 inches^4, the beam has simple pin connections at either end, and all loads other than the weight of the crew are disregarded.

How much will the beam deflect? Please round to the nearest tenth of an inch.



For steel beam with load at center and supports at both ends.
Max Deflection = (Load x Length^3) / (Mod-Elasticity x Moment-Inertia x 48)
= (6000lb x (50 x 12in)^3) / (29000000lb/in^2 x 850in^4 x 48)
= 1.09533 in
= ~1.1 in

Done. BTW, I f**king hate imperial units! Metric for the world!!



 

    
 
 

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