Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 1677 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s December 01 - 01:38pm EST 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
 

  Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere? 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Next >>
Stuart K Apr 26, 2007, 04:24pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Brendan Gonsalves said:


What are the main reasons to use it over Windows XP?


It is typically more secure and more stable than Windows XP, and it often performs better on the same hardware than XP does.

However, I just recommend that people try it and see if they like it. If nothing else, you will broaden your computer experience a bit.

I've used Linux for various things for over a decade, and am now running Ubuntu 7.04 on my desktop computer at work. Ubuntu really is a very nicely polished product.

Both Linux and Mac OS X really _are_ viable alternatives to Windows at this point. I would bet that 90% of home computer users could happily use Linux or the Mac and not miss a thing. (The percentage probably depends mainly upon how many people are hardcore gamers, and I've always heard that's really a small percentage of total home computer users.)

Personally, I'm not completely pleased with Windows, other MS software, and the way MS behaves. I also don't like their pricing. Viruses, trojans, spyware, crashes, blue screens, phooey! Other OSes are like a breath of fresh air. I'm certainly not in any hurry to adopt Vista, and a lot of people feel the same way.

Some people will still like Windows the best for whatever reason. No problem. I'm just glad I can have several options and can use what's best for my needs.


Want to enjoy less advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
Adam Kolak Apr 26, 2007, 04:45pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Wow lots of new faces in this thread, that's always nice to see, welcome folks :)

I have tried out multiple distributions of Linux. Kubuntu, Ubuntu, Xubuntu, Linspire, Damn Small Linux, to name the ones I have used the most. Linspire sucks by the way. Damn Small Linux is decent if you have a really really slow computer (like Pentium 1). Overall I like Ubuntu the best of the Linux distributions I have tried.

Right now I have a tri-boot going, between XP, Vista, and Ubuntu. I use XP alot, and I use Vista quite a bit. I fool around with Ubuntu 7.04 alot though. I mostly have it because I want to learn about it more. It's really not anything like Windows once you start trying to install programs and get things setup. Getting kind of use to the whole "sudo apt-get" thing to install programs now-a-days, but at first it was really weird. And I still follow guides and forums to help me do stuff in Ubuntu. Overall Ubuntu is still experimental for me. For everyday I use I still prefer Windows for its ease of use, and because I know Windows in and out.

Windows is a great OS, I love it, and it is without doubt the best OS you can use today. But I think it is important that Linux is learned by people like us who are involved with computers, because Linux is gaining and its important to know your way around Linux the way you know your way around Windows. I can't ever see giving up Windows completely, but I can see using Linux more and more.

Adam Kolak
Moderator, Hardware Analysis
adam@hardwareanalysis.com
DFI LP P35-T2RS | Xeon Quad @ 3.2Ghz | 4GB DDR2-1000 | 8800GT 512MB | See Profile
Stuart K Apr 26, 2007, 04:46pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Juan Francisco Saavedra said:
Ubuntu is great. Really, it is. It was my first contact with Linux and I will always be thankful to it. I've learned a LOT thanks to it, and mainly, the breaking-up with Windows less painful.:)
But:
After researching and installing other Linux distros, I have to say, that Ubuntu is far behind some of them, such as : Fedora, Debian and, my personal favourite, openSuSE ;).
I'm actually runing openSuSE with dual-boot, and got to say is rather better than Ubuntu. Though Ubuntu offers something not usually available : the live cd.:_)
Before ending up, three more things:
-SuSE 10.2 + Beryl goes more than fine on my computer WHICH DOESN'T MEET VISTA MINIMUM SPECS. So, I can assure you, Linux is much faster. (Though startup is a bit slower).
-Security is AWESOME.
-Careful with audio and video codecs.


Ubuntu hasn't been around that long, so how much experience have you had with 4 different distros?

I used SuSE for longer than you've used Linux evidently. :) I used it daily for a couple of years here (9.3 and then 10.0.) I've also had a lot of experience with RedHat and Debian.

SuSE is nice, but Debian is built better and Ubuntu inherits that superiority. I needed to upgrade or switch sometime fairly soon because SuSE 10 is being EOLed later this year. I thought about upgrading to 10.2, but decided to get away from Novell, and get away from ReiserFS. I installed Ubuntu 6.10 and had everything I needed in no time at all. I upgraded to 7.04 when it came out, and that upgrade went more smoothly than an upgrade with an rpm-based distro ever has (including SuSE 9.3 to 10.0),

Sorry that Ubuntu didn't give you the warm fuzzies, but saying that it's far behind Fedora, Debian, and SuSE just isn't true. (How can it be behind Debian, anyway? It's based on Debian.)


Stuart K Apr 26, 2007, 04:51pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Adam K. said:

Windows is a great OS, I love it, and it is without doubt the best OS you can use today.


How come I never hear people say things like that in real life? :)

Adam Kolak Apr 26, 2007, 05:06pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
It's funny I always hear all these problems people have with Windows, and I never have any of those problems. The last time I saw a BSOD it was because my videocard died, thanks to BFG that was replaced for free. I have never seen a BSOD in Windows Vista, not even in the Betas or RC2, or even back when it was Longhorn. I can't remember the last time I had an application crash under XP or Vista (or Ubuntu for that matter). It rarely happens. I use OS X Tiger in school, and applications crash in OS X way too much compared to my experiences in Windows and Linux. For me Windows "Just works".

Maybe I'm just really good at keeping my PC clean and running good. I love Linux and never really have problems with it either, and when I do I can usually figure out how to solve them from a quick search on the web. Overall I have found Windows XP, Vista and Ubuntu to be all completely stable operating systems. They all run great, and they all have little things about them that stand out above the rest. And that's why I tri-boot them all together.

Adam Kolak
Moderator, Hardware Analysis
adam@hardwareanalysis.com
DFI LP P35-T2RS | Xeon Quad @ 3.2Ghz | 4GB DDR2-1000 | 8800GT 512MB | See Profile
Bitmap Apr 26, 2007, 05:17pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Stuart Krivis said:
Adam K. said:

Windows is a great OS, I love it, and it is without doubt the best OS you can use today.


How come I never hear people say things like that in real life? :)

*raises hand* I say that all the time with my buddies. :)

________
"None of you understand. I'm not locked up in here with you. YOU'RE locked up in here with ME." - Walter Kovacs, A.K.A. Rorschach.
Adam Kolak Apr 26, 2007, 05:24pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Bobby Phillipps said:
Stuart Krivis said:
Adam K. said:

Windows is a great OS, I love it, and it is without doubt the best OS you can use today.


How come I never hear people say things like that in real life? :)

*raises hand* I say that all the time with my buddies. :)

I have a friend who owns the MacBook Pro and even he says that sometimes he gets the urge to just install Boot Camp and get XP up running native on it after he experiences silly Mac OS X errors on it. Funny thing is I know more about OS X then him and I don't even own a computer that runs it. He had to ask me how to bring up the Force Quit box the other day. So I showed him.

Adam Kolak
Moderator, Hardware Analysis
adam@hardwareanalysis.com
DFI LP P35-T2RS | Xeon Quad @ 3.2Ghz | 4GB DDR2-1000 | 8800GT 512MB | See Profile
Marinus Mellaart Apr 26, 2007, 06:59pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Has anyone here tried LINSPIRE? Formerly known as LINDOWS, it was distributed in many different languages, and recently it has a download service (CNR) to allow "LINUX Newbies" to download and intall software packages. Just a thought, check it out here http://www.linspire.com

Adam Kolak Apr 26, 2007, 07:16pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Yes I tried Linspire (like I mentioned in one of my other posts on this thread). It's crap. Ubuntu is way better.

Adam Kolak
Moderator, Hardware Analysis
adam@hardwareanalysis.com
DFI LP P35-T2RS | Xeon Quad @ 3.2Ghz | 4GB DDR2-1000 | 8800GT 512MB | See Profile
mothow Apr 26, 2007, 07:37pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
It wont install on my system.So now thats 3 OS's that this POS wont run other than windows XP Pro.. The J micron drivers suck.

ASRock Z97 Extreme 4 / i7 4790K / Corsair H80i / 4x4GB Crucial Ballistix Smart Tracer DDR3 1600 / 1TB Western Digital Caviar Black / 240GB Mushkin Chronos Deluxe SSD / 2x Evga GTX 670 FTW 2GB in SLI / Sound Blaster Recon3D Fatal1ty / Corsair HX1000w
Kevin Connors Apr 26, 2007, 07:38pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
I'm still surveying Linux OSs. But I have to agree, Ubuntu is the friendliest, and quite simple and compact. And, best of all, it is truly and absolutely free.

The problem I have is that it appears to be a totally 32 bit OS. I just spent several hundred dollars, and am about to spend a few hundred more, upgrading to Core 2 Duo, and I'd like to be able to exploit my system's new 64-bit capability.

In my case, or others like me, I think Mandriva is the way to go.

Adam Kolak Apr 26, 2007, 08:10pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
There is a 64 bit version of Ubuntu you know, right?

http://www.ubuntu.com/getubuntu/download

Choose AMD or Intel 64 bit instead of x86 based PC to download 64 bit version. ;)

Adam Kolak
Moderator, Hardware Analysis
adam@hardwareanalysis.com
DFI LP P35-T2RS | Xeon Quad @ 3.2Ghz | 4GB DDR2-1000 | 8800GT 512MB | See Profile
Mort1616 Apr 26, 2007, 08:28pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
No ones mentioned Mandrake.

I was mentioned early in the thread that Ubuntu gives you lots of free software which is true. But I would like to point out that Windows has a myriad of free software available; open office, firefox and a whole host of third party stuff as well. Apart from buying your OS from MS you don't have to spend another doller/pound (I am English) with them, all you have to do is get off your fat arse/ass and google around.

Also has anyone tried turning off all the "eye candy" (unnescessary crap) in Vista, and disabled all the unused functions? Haven't used it much and only on a very high spec mated computer. Will it run at a reasonable speed for spec - that seems to be peoples problem. BTW I have seen it BSOD, nearly peed myself laughing it was the second time I saw it running. I'm no big fan but I can't complain. - "Gilbert and Sullivan - Its a pirates life for me" great song from a great musical.

Mort

I'm a mawg. Half man. Half dog.

Hey, I'm my own best friend.

Rig spec in profile.
Bitmap Apr 26, 2007, 08:28pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Kevin Connors said:
In my case, or others like me, I think Mandriva is the way to go.

Mandriva, or at the time, MandrakeLinux, was my first foray into the world of Linux, and I actually found it quite welcoming, considering my skill with computers at the time (4.5 on a scale of 1-10 :P) I dual-booted XP Home and Mandrake for quite a while, starting with Mandrake 9.0. Then, I bought the 10.1 PowerPack+Book. Such a great operating system.

I'm trying to give SuSE and Fedora Core 6 some runtime on my PC, but my CD/DVD drive seems to be crapping out. Time for a new purchase. :(

________
"None of you understand. I'm not locked up in here with you. YOU'RE locked up in here with ME." - Walter Kovacs, A.K.A. Rorschach.
B Apr 26, 2007, 08:34pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
Anyone here used Red Hat?

Gerritt Apr 26, 2007, 08:56pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
OK, so I'm going to put on my security hat here....

I've been a user of Linux and BSD since Yrggisil (sp).
Both BSD and UNIX are based arround a OPEN connectivity (as opposed to VMS which was closed). The Linux and BSD initiatives, including GNU are based around easy access to all source code. If everyone has access to the source code, to include CHAINS and all other FW and IDS/IPS applications, the vulnerabulities increase a thousand fold!

Yes, MS started off ALL OPEN, but in the last few iterations has attempted to close SOME of the points necessary, to the degree that under Vista, some very usefull applications will not load by default.

Though IBM and other major OS/HW manufacturers have provided for a Linux/BSD based platform in the enterprise, it still remains that the defaults will open up more ports than the standard MS Server implementation, and IBM and others require a FW in front of them to be concidered to be internet accessable and reletively safe.

Even AIX needs to be tuned for secure access.

I'm not trying to say that AIX, or any flavor there of is better than MS2003, but niether am I trying to say MS2003 is better than any UNIX flavor.

Most of the new US CERT alerts that I get are for UNIX or MAC vulnerabilities.

Linux is cool, and is a OS that should be under concideration for those that have a specific need and don't need some of the standard operations that are provided by MS or Novell.

Oddly, I've not gotten a Novell CERT in a long, long time....hmmmm.

Gerritt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
dark41 Apr 26, 2007, 09:10pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
I haven't had many BSODs on XP and no real problems with it, other than getting to know it at first.

On the other hand, I had several BSODs with Vista. In fact, now Vista won't install to my RAID array at all. It gets to extracting files and freezes.

I'm always looking at alternatives. :)

EX38-DS5
E8500@4.0GHz (445x9, 1.40v) TRUE Black
Corsair HX620W
2x2gb Kingston HyperX 9600
HIS IceQ4 HD4850
2X1TB F1s (RAID 0) XP Pro/Win7 Ult 64
Auzen X-Fi Prelude 7.1
Cambridge Soundworks 500w 5.1
G5, Antec 1200
Robyn Hahn Apr 26, 2007, 09:52pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
FingerMeElmo87 said:
where can this Vmware and Synaptic be found? can you run any windows app with that? and how does it work? which one is better? do you need to change your drivers?

Actually, the operating system *itself* is set up as a multi-user environment, which implies the bottom of the barrel user - the common herd - have little to nil privileges. Linux is a security-focused OS... it was designed with that as the first objective, instead of as a tack-on, as in the case of single-user OSes. That's a good thing. A virus would also have nil privileges, so it couldn't run.

As far as installing a virus with software install, if you stick to installing via Synaptic and the Canonical repositories, you won't go wrong - they'll have been checked for nasties.

Robyn Hahn Apr 26, 2007, 09:59pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
John Ingram said:
Seems okay for the office; but for the home? Games? Education software? Joysticks? Steering Wheels? Retro compatiblity for your old win98 games that you can get to work in XP compatibility mode, etc etc.

I'm running X-Plane - the man's version of flight simulation, requiring real flying skills - on Linux... in WinXP, I typically got 16 - 26fps, in Linux I get 55 - 95... same settings. Other people claim the same sort of fps boosts for Warcraft, Doom2 and all those high-graphics-demands games. My Logitech Extreme3D Pro USB joystick was basically installed as soon as I installed the OS - didn't even have to think about it. All runs sweet-as!

Gerritt Apr 26, 2007, 10:19pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Re: Ubuntu here, Ubuntu there, Ubuntu everywhere?
No BSODs on Vista.
New load on VISTA Ultimate.
XP was just as if not more stable, but when I went to XP x64 I had huge problems.
Oddly, the 3rd party applications seem to work better under Vista than XP64, but I've not tried Visa/64 on the same system.
Can anyone out there tell me the deltas?

Gerrittt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO

Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, Next >>

 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.