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  memory timings and voltage? 
 
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squire strahan Jan 14, 2008, 08:17pm EST Report Abuse
hi im new to OC or even messing with the cell menus in any bios. but i was looking in the bios under my memory page. and the voltage was set to 1.75v when the memory is stated at 2.75v
and i looking under the timing also and the memory is stated at 2-3-2-6(CAS-tRCD-tRP-tRAS)
and the setting are set to auto. should i manually set the timings 2-3-2-6? and set the volts to 2.75? are should i just leave them on auto?


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Gerritt Jan 14, 2008, 08:52pm EST Report Abuse
>> Re: memory timings amd voltage?
squire strahan said:
hi im new to OC or even messing with the cell menus in any bios. but i was looking in the bios under my memory page. and the voltage was set to 1.75v when the memory is stated at 2.75v
and i looking under the timing also and the memory is stated at 2-3-2-6(CAS-tRCD-tRP-tRAS)
and the setting are set to auto. should i manually set the timings 2-3-2-6? and set the volts to 2.75? are should i just leave them on auto?


Don't change the volts unless the memory is unstable at the lower power levels!

You're focusing on the wrong area to start.
If the memory modules themselves are rated at 2-3-2-6 and you are running stock CLOCKING for it and they are stable at 1.75, then leave them there.

You only have to move from the auto timings if your modules are rated at higher than being detected, or defaulted by the memory controller/MB/on die.

Now once you start moving the MHz clocking upwards along with the FSB and Divider, you will probably have to increase the operational voltage to retain stability, but this also increases HEAT. So you should only increase voltage settings to offset instabilities in an OC environment, and then only in small increments.

Gerritt


Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
Mami Hashimoto Apr 05, 2008, 02:20pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: memory timings and voltage?
Cerritt,

I think you may have misunderstood his/her question. It seems that English may not be his/her native language. I think what Squire is saying is that on his bios setting, the memory voltage is set at 1.75v when his ram actaully suggests the voltage to be 2.75v. I also think he is asking if he should manually put the correct timing. From my own experience, some mobos use the lowest dimms by default. Same thing can be said about the timing. I had to manually set the correct suggested voltage and also the timing in my bios setting. on Auto set up, it was using only 1.9v and a very slacked timing of 5-6-6-15 before I had to manually set the correct voltage and timing which are suggested by the manufacturer.

~Vel Apr 05, 2008, 03:24pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: memory timings and voltage?
I love topics brought back from 3 months ago!

Gerritt Apr 06, 2008, 12:46am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: memory timings and voltage?
Vel, As do I, but let me respond to the poster Mami.
Even if your DRAM can run UP TO 2.75V, this is not a reason to increase the voltage to 2.75, it just means that it will survive at those levels of voltage, but WILL generate a great deal more heat.
If you can get to the rated clockings, and run stable without increasing the DRAM V, then do so, if the DRAM becomes unstable, find the stable voltage (lowest) that you can.
Don't just crank it up to 2.75V if you don't HAVE TO.

Gerritt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO


 

    
 
 

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