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  The future of gaming? 
 
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TamTheBam Mar 25, 2009, 06:40pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?

Good point. And from what I gather frm the video link you supplied,
it seems it will only be a members club only. I suppose if it works like
they say it do, then the gamers who have high spec machines and are not
using the system like members would, we'd only cos a lag in the system???
That would defeat the purpose of the whole idea I guess??

....I'm back, but only as a part-timer... :)
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Gerritt Mar 25, 2009, 06:44pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Sean,
It doesn't matter if you purchaced the product, you'd have to pay OnLive for access to their users/players, as well as any saves. It is all remote.
Additionally after listening to the presentation by the CEO and COO, you'd need 5Mb broadband just to get 720p levels of resolution, much less 1900x or 1600x resolutions.
As I look at my two screens, this would be a major issue for me.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
Mar 25, 2009, 06:45pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Gerritt Mar 25, 2009, 02:39pm PDT
I find myself in the unusual position of actually agreeing with McFly (go figure!).

Why so unusual? :P

Sean Costello Mar 25, 2009, 06:49pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Gerritt said:
Sean,
It doesn't matter if you purchaced the product, you'd have to pay OnLive for access to their users/players, as well as any saves. It is all remote.
Additionally after listening to the presentation by the CEO and COO, you'd need 5Mb broadband just to get 720p levels of resolution, much less 1900x or 1600x resolutions.
As I look at my two screens, this would be a major issue for me.



Yeah thats kinda what i meant, if it was on just their network. I mean could someone using OnLive join a public server that normal PC users would use/see or is it OnLive Only servers for only OnLive users?

______
Story of My Life- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c764JWVt5Fw
Gerritt Mar 25, 2009, 06:54pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
I love the whispered exchange between the COO and the CEO at about 41minutes into insofar as the datacenter and ISP agreements being made by OnLive.... "I'll take this one".
They both also mentioned 1500 miles as a maximum. Later on around 46 minutes they pretty much said that you had to be within that range for the service to work. Thus my contention that it would require regional server farms, but they didn't state how the user community could or would work across the 1500 mile boundries.

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
Meats_Of_Evil Mar 25, 2009, 06:56pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Gerrit excellent explanation, you always know how to lecture us lol. Also, I did heard in the video that the server was 50 miles away and even with that I saw jerkiness and lag. But what worries me is that they say the latency is lower than any human can perceive; I always hate when they say something like this, cause based from experience they'll probably won't be able to satisfy most hardcore or experienced gamers due to the noticed lag in games. Now I don't know if it was for show but why did they shot themselves standing still in Crysis Wars? Is it because of the guy who spoke was a total noob (he seemed like one) or was it due to the latency not letting them play normally?

Regardless, I like one thing the article said:
OnLive will live or die by milliseconds.


Sean, I was wondering the exact same thing as you. Also, how will playing and streaming a multiplayer game affect the connection? Cause we all know what happens to the ping when we're downloading other stuff while playing. And also, what will happen to mic support? That will turn off a lot of people. But if their target are singleplayer games then I guess this doesn't matter.

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Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Meats_Of_Evil Mar 25, 2009, 07:00pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Gerritt said:
Sean,
It doesn't matter if you purchaced the product, you'd have to pay OnLive for access to their users/players, as well as any saves. It is all remote.
Additionally after listening to the presentation by the CEO and COO, you'd need 5Mb broadband just to get 720p levels of resolution, much less 1900x or 1600x resolutions.
As I look at my two screens, this would be a major issue for me.


Yes, they did say HD but these days HD is everything above 480i, this case being 720p which I think it will be the maximum until ISP's evolve. I'm sure a lot of people who are used to true HD like most of us here will certainly notice the video compression and loss of quality.

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Dr. Peaceful Mar 25, 2009, 07:10pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
The idea of, using a super fast computer as the mainframe then split the power to many thin clients, is not new. The idea was originated when at the time (60s / 70s) they think the only way computer can go would be a giant mainframe. The idea Flopped!

Why? Because, if you can have a computer decently powerful at about the same price as a thin (dumb) client computer, why the hack bother to buy a thin client at all! Not to mention the overall cost of maintaining a central server and networks to feed the thin clients. It is just not cost effective.

Especially today, when personal computer gets faster and faster, it will just get yet more faster in the future, no doubt. When you can have the best and the fastest computer hardware right here at home, why bother to have someone else run the PC for you from miles away. Just doesn't make any sense.

Geeks like us, like to have a system built by ourselves, maintain by ourselves, can run powerfully independent of any outside network, and to play games that's in our own possession. This OnLive thing is just completely against that idea. You own not a thing, you pay premiums for their service and rental for their equipments, and then what? They feed to you games like a TV? Yeah right! Like many mentioned there are network latency and bandwidth problems. Unlike TV which data goes mostly one direction, games you need interactions, therefore it's a bidirectional communication. Multiple that by hundreds if not thousands of households, you will get a network problem there.

Future of gaming? Not really. ;) Fat Clients rule, man!

Mar 25, 2009, 07:25pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?

Gerritt Mar 25, 2009, 07:30pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
You know, this may be a good solution for the console crowd, that are used to those resolutions, but I think, like myself, it will turn off a lot of the PC crowd once the max res is widely known.
Now having said that, if my Mother wanted to play Crysis, this company would provide her a way to do so.
I do have a console, a PS2, which I bought like 3 or 4 years after it was introduced. My kids play DDR on it, as well as Legos SW.
My Mother has a Core2 lappy with a good GPU, my kids and wife have....(I know whats coming) Dells.
My Kids love to play Dazzler, and do so online with no inturuptions. My wife...well she doesn't play anything; if she did she'd be 1227! as she is very very focused.
What does this particular service bring to ME or my family? Very little. I don't upgrade my system just for games, but I appreciate being able to play my games on a new system.
What does it bring to the folks that post here about:"How do I build a gaming machine for less than $700", well maybe much more.
This offering from OnLive is focused on those that would rather spend $200/year (an arbitary sum chosen out of my hat) vs. those that would spend that money NOW. I've sat on my present primary build for YEARS. This is a AMD 4400+ 939 socket, DDR system. I have recently purchaced an i7, 920 processor, 12GB DDR3 replacement/upgrade, but don't have the BALLS required to re-plumb, replace, and upgrade my reference (BIO)system to RAID5 right now. I hate the downtime. I have the parts, have spent the money, it's up to me to actually implement them. Having said that. The average user would have to spend 3-5 times as much in order to get a pre-built system with the same functionality that I expect to get from this upgrade. BTW, my upgrade is costing just a bit over $1000.
For low enders and non-twitch games, I can see this service working, but they aren't pushing that. I can't see how this service will work world-wide, like Steam, nor can I see it pushing out high end gamers or thier systems. I seem to recall that the new consoles were supposed to do that anyway.

[end rant]

Gerritt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
BlazeYDH Mar 27, 2009, 08:10pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
I saw this thing the other day. I've thought about the latency issues, but one thing I haven't seen mentioned here (almost, but they went another direction) Is that. You can buy or "rent" these games from what the video shows. What happens if this system actually makes it out of BETA testing and does hit stores? Let's say you pick up OnLive. You start to play it to find that there is not latency issues or anything. Well I'll be damned this is a pretty good thing to come, but what happens in a year or two when it becomes obsolete? Or the company goes kaput? You spent hundreds of dollars buying all the latest and greatest games on your OnLive service and at $60-$120 per game that's not something to fool around with. Company goes kaput, what happens to your games? You spent hundreds and have nothing to show for it! Sure, since you bought it you could now go download legal backup copies for your PS 4/5 and Xbox 720/1440, but then again that would require you to have a modded console which voids your warranty and could get banned from live services if caught! So unless there's something that guarantees "Hey if we go bankrupt we will send you legit unopened copies of the games you bought from us." Then consumers should realize they could potentially be loosing hundreds or even thousands of dollars.

Ah, didn't think of that did you? lol.

~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~~^~^~^~
Blaze, putting the Hard Anal in Hardware Analysis.
Gerritt Mar 27, 2009, 10:59pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Blaze,
You are not "buying" the games, just the access.
Of course if the service is offline or gone you loose everything you did on them, but then again, if your system crashes, and you don't have a good enough backup, the same is true.
This service, OnLive, is offering the access to multiple games, supposedly first tier games, and doesn't require a 1GB download. I can see where this service could work, I just don't see HOW it can work. Even within the US with a 3MB DSL connection, their demo "paused" three times, even though the content was supposedly buffered.
Of course I didn't download thier plug in, but I've gotten 480p content from Hulu with much fewer lags.
This is more like a cell phone contract, you pay monthly, or you commit to a longer term, but if the service goes away, then you no longer pay, but you've lost your connection to the services, and many of the functions that you had are gone as well.
Instead of buying a $50 game/month, you are getting access to many games for a lower price, and you don't have to upgrade.
There are some trade-offs, but it could work.

Gerritt

Ad Astra Per Aspera
(A rough road leads to the Stars)
We all know what we know, and everyone else knows we are wrong.
System Specifications in BIO
BlazeYDH Mar 28, 2009, 01:54am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: The future of gaming?
Here, if you watch this video about half way through he's going through the games.
You can clearly see the option to Buy or Rent
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lxReVwEYTAs&eurl=http%3A%2F...r_embedded

If I am mistaken then I give my apologies.

~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~^~~^~^~^~
Blaze, putting the Hard Anal in Hardware Analysis.

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