Please register or login. There are 0 registered and 1227 anonymous users currently online. Current bandwidth usage: 326.30 kbit/s December 02 - 10:18am EST 
Hardware Analysis
      
Forums Product Prices
  Contents 
 
 

  Latest Topics 
 

More >>
 

    
 
 

  You Are Here: 
 
/ Forums / Software /
 

  Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE! 
 
 Author 
 Date Written 
 Tools 
Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, Next >>
john albrich Oct 08, 2010, 11:37pm EDT Report Abuse

This post is mostly something I hope motivates more people to start using backups and a good UPS. It could save you a LOT of grief and time, and maybe even money.

Within the last couple weeks I experienced 2 catastrophic failures affecting the same system.

It was ONLY because I make regular backups and use a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply) that I did not suffer greatly or flat-out waste a lot of my personal time.

Failure #1
I incorrectly used a benchmark program and ended-up massively corrupting the OS and files on my system disk. The failure ultimately required re-partitioning and re-formatting.

But by simply retrieving my last full backup and my last incremental backup, I was up and running in less time than it takes to prep and eat dinner without losing a single byte of important data.


Failure #2
A major power outage happened when a massive storm was about 20 miles to the west of my apartment. I had no expectation the storm would be a problem. The storm wasn't even close yet took out our power for almost an hour. The UPS let me finish a download in progress, and then do a controlled shutdown of the computer...which resulted in losing NO data. (I enable write caching on my drives, and an unplanned power outage can cause the loss of quite a bit of data...even corrupting the registry)


Compared to the hours...perhaps days wasted otherwise to:
-re-install the OS,
-install OS updates*,
-install program updates
-re-build your data, emails, etc (if that's even possible)

backups and a UPS are a very low-cost investment. High-quality backup software is FREE. Mass storage is at about US$50/1TB. And a UPS that will handle a typical system + display is about US$100. The UPS I use on my home PC also provides line filtering, and Automatic Voltage Regulation (AVR)...which can also increase the lifespan and reliability of your PSU and help your system run just a little bit cooler.

I don't even bother saving my backups to DVDs anymore...hard drives are now LOWER cost per GB than decent quality DVD-R discs, they're MUCH more reliable, they're a hell of a lot faster, and a 1TB hard drive takes up a whole lot less space than 250 DVDs in my fire-proof safe.


*Re: updates. You may not even be able to obtain updates anymore when you use certain versions of Windows! Example: for WinXP you already can download only security updates and Microsoft's support will end April 2014. And, some programs require registering during installation with the manufacturer's website in order to enable the program. I have 5 or 6 that work that way, and several of the companies no longer exist. Re-enabling those programs is impossible if I had to reinstall them, the close to $200 I spent on them would be thrown away, and my ability to use them would be gone.

Note: my backup protocols are actually more substantial than just a simple weekly backup to a single disk I stuff in a safe, but even a simple weekly single-copy backup will save time, grief, and perhaps even money.


edit:
Changed my prior observation that HDDs were about same cost per GB...to reflect that HDDs are now LOWER cost per GB than decent quality DVD-R discs (e.g. I found 3TB 7200rpm Hitachi on sale+rebate for US$40/TB=$0.04/GB)


Want to enjoy fewer advertisements and more features? Click here to become a Hardware Analysis registered user.
john albrich Oct 09, 2010, 03:59am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

New Info

I started using Disk Checkup again after I restored the backups to the disk, and it provided this forecast failure today.

"Disk Checkup" forecasts the system drive will fail in about a month:
15 Nov 2010 10:41:20*
I interpret that to mean it could actually fail at any time.

Prior to the problem I had, I wasn't using Disk Checkup as I should have been. Had I been doing so, I might have received early warning and entirely avoided the system corruption problem.

It may have been a drive problem that caused the data corruption instead of using the benchmarking program. Or perhaps the benchmarking simply accelerated a failure in the drive (it's been in use 24/7 as a system drive in one machine or another for about 5 years).

And, this morning I started hearing the head seeking even over the whirring of a ceiling fan and a space heater, whereas before I could not hear anything from the drive with 0 fans running.

Time for a new drive...Yes!


Disk Checkup (for personal use it's freeware)
http://www.passmark.com/products/diskcheckup.htm


* Personally, I think providing the hour, minute, and second in the forecast is pretty damn cheeky. Even showing the DOM is pushing it. It's about as meaningful as the system reporting the CPU voltage is 1.823 volts or the core temp is 47.8 degrees. Those many digits just aren't meaningful and they aren't that accurate.

Meats_Of_Evil Oct 09, 2010, 11:39am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
I'm interested to know in what your methods are for backing up a drive? Do you have like a RAID installation? Or do it weekly by software?

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 09, 2010, 01:49pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
I found this so important also, that I made a video of how to properly choose a UPS, unfortunately, it's only in Spanish: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngegj4bI-sE

For Backups this is how I do it:
Drive 1: Files are created here (This is the main drive)

Drive 2: Files are synchronized with Drive 1 (Only important stuff such as MyDocs, Desktop, Firefox Profile, Thunderbird Profile, etc.)

Drive 3: On my 2nd computer a File Server - Files Synched with drive 2.

Drive 4: External drive, I synchronize with Drive 3 and store this one in a fireproof, waterproof safe.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
Meats_Of_Evil Oct 09, 2010, 11:29pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Joshua I loved the video man, it was really simple and straight to the point. I honestly did not know the things you said. Now I need to save and buy a good UPS.

Also loved the music, I would love to hear some Michel Camilo on the next video :)

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Everything I write is Sarcasm.
Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 09, 2010, 11:31pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

Thanks Meats! Glad you found it useful.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
john albrich Oct 10, 2010, 04:19am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Meats_Of_Evil said:
I'm interested to know in what your methods are for backing up a drive? Do you have like a RAID installation? Or do it weekly by software?

For that particular system I use a very simple backup approach. I currently don't use RAID. If I did, it would be for performance only.

The main reason I didn't use RAID in this case is that I believe an important part of a good backup protocol for important data is to have some backups physically separated from the system. Even better is to have at least one backup located physically off-site. However, you can lose certain legal protections by doing so, thus it's a balancing act of convenience, redundancy, and legal considerations.

Since I have decided to use a physically separate backup in this particular setup, there's really very little benefit gained by using RAID for redundancy and RAID would needlessly make system management a little bit more complicated.

I have configured the system such that only the OS, active programs, and day-to-day data (like email) are kept on the C drive. This keeps the C drive to a relatively small size that can be backed-up quickly. I've set the partition size to 25GB. Currently about 15GB (excluding the pagefile) is actually used. If you put everything on the C drive, the monthly and weekly full backups would take correspondingly longer times and more disk space...depending on what you put on the C drive. I know people that over the years just kept indiscriminately adding more and more things to their C drive. It then contains all sorts of useless crap that keeps getting backed-up, taking much more time and disk space than it should.

Here's the simplified backup protocol I'm using on that particular system:

A monthly backup is made to an encrypted drive that is normally stored in a fireproof safe when not being used for backup or restore (note: it could also be kept off-site).
A weekly full backup is made to a different physical drive located in the current system. This disk gets its power from a separate power "brick" and is thus protected if the system PSU fails in a way that zaps the rest of the electronics and drives.
A daily incremental backup of key files/folders is made to a different physical drive located in the current system. It may or may not be the same drive as the weekly backup archive (in this specific instance it is on the "weekly backup" drive). This includes things like email folders, key Documents and Settings content, etc.

Monthly Backup Details
From this you can see the amount of time needed to do this is actually very small...a bit more than an hour a year. It's a no-brainer when you think of the potentially many hours or days that recovering from a system crash or drive failure might take without a backup.

Every 30 days (or so) I spend about 6 "hands-on" minutes doing this...
Remove the drive from the safe, connect to the system, initiate the backup, and then put it back in the safe. Older backup files on the drive will be deleted to make room for the latest ones. With a 1TB drive this [i[could[/i] provide up to 8 years of "C disk" backups before backup data are dropped off the drive. But I don't keep that many monthly backups so the rest of the disk is used for simple archival. I keep an ultra-conservative 12 months (12 datasets) worth of older backup images. And this is just in case for some reason a malware attack or file corruption is detected only after a couple of months have gone by. It's sort of like keeping multiple Windows "restore points". If needed, you can find and go back to an older backup dataset that has not been compromised. I also keep a copy of the latest monthly backup dataset at a friend's house. This is in case my apartment is burgled and everything is taken.

I didn't count the "hands-on" time to take a copy to my friend's house as most people probably won't do that. The backups in the safe would be sufficient probably 99% of the time. It's just something convenient for me to do so I do it for a bit more added protection.

This "30 day" backup can be done whenever it's convenient.
It takes about 4 minutes to retrieve the drive from the safe, connect it to the computer and initiate the backup. The backup takes about 10 minutes and runs in the background while I do other things. It takes about 2 minutes to disconnect the drive and stuff it back in the safe.

An automated background weekly full backup is made to a drive inside the computer. This requires no personal time/attention. Each weekly backup is replaced by the newest backup. There is no need to keep older weekly backup files so the amount of disk space required is limited to the space taken up by a single image of your system disk. Since I use compression, this is about 8GB.

An automated background daily incremental backup is made to that same local drive. Again this requires no personal time/attention and the older dataset is replaced by the newer dataset each time a backup is made.
(Note: Mirroring of critical folders. While I chose not to do this on that system, it would be an fairly easy thing to add another backup category...a category wherein important files/folders that change at any given time are immediately automatically copied to that local drive. This would mean you have almost real-time backup copies of files/folders you deem particularly vital. Your restored data wouldn't be even hours old as might be the case by relying on daily backups.


Of course, a person could decide to NOT save a monthly backup in a fireproof safe and thus avoid even the "6 minutes" required to do this. In a decent number of instances of "simple" system crashes the automated weekly local backup will still reduce your risks by quite a bit. But for 6 minutes a month and the low-cost of an extra hard drive I think the added protection is well worth it.

As for daily incremental backups...this situation has me giving some thought to this.

With the very low cost of high-capacity hard drives and the vastly improved performance of systems and hard drives over the last few years, I'm beginning to think it would be just as easy and makes sense to setup an automated schedule of a full daily background backup. It requires no "hands-on" time and runs in the background so the impact on me would be virtually nil. It would simplify things without any negative effect on restorations, and would even save a few minutes during the restore process.


Edit to add:
I changed the backup scripts to create automatic full backup at 4 a.m. every day
Trying it for awhile. So...no more full-weekly or daily-incremental backups. This also means the monthly full backup now simply consists of copying the last daily backup dataset to the drive I keep in the safe. That's even faster: 6:30 v. 10:30 minutes for the copy, and takes about a minute off the 6 minutes of "hand-on" time. I'll see how things go.

edit: forgot to mention the weekly/daily backup internal hard drive is powered independently from the system PSU.

Oct 10, 2010, 12:27pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Nice backup system, Joshua. I've been putting off setting up something for far too long. :|

I've got one external drive that I use as an encrypted backup, but that's not going to do me any good in the even of a fire.

Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 10, 2010, 01:07pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Actually, I should give more details.

I use two drives, one for the OS the other for Documents and such.
I then change all of the "preferences" folders to the Documents drive, so for example:

Desktop (Just look for User Shell Folders in Registry)
Pictures
Downloads
Favorites
Firefox Profile
Thunderbird Profile
etc.

These can all be changed to point to another drive. That way when you restore your OS, you can just wipe the 1st Main drive without having to worry about your docs and preferences on the 2nd drive. Regarding the OS Restore, I just create an Image using TrueImage of the whole drive - in less than 10 minutes I can restore a nice, fresh, activated OS. But yeah, the SAFE is definitely a must, or at least storing it somewhere else. Can't imagine what I would do if somebody where to break inside my house and steal everything.

I am thinking of creating encrypted images on another drive and taking that to a relative's house, or maybe a Safe in a bank. You can never be too careful and must always apply Murphy's laws.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
john albrich Oct 10, 2010, 01:40pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Joshua Marius, LeThe said:
...I am thinking of creating encrypted images on another drive and taking that to a relative's house, or maybe a Safe in a bank. You can never be too careful and must always apply Murphy's laws.


Re: Encryption
If you setup each partition/drive as an encrypted entity using something like TrueCrypt, it simplifies things, and I've found the performance is generally better than using a backup program's encryption, or encrypting at the file/folder level. If one uses TrueCrypt in particular, I think it is also likely to be more robust encryption.

Re: Off-site Storage
In the U.S., if the backup is kept at a business (bank, at work, online backup company, etc) a search warrant may not even be needed. Unlike a search warrant, a National Security Letter doesn't need a judge's approval and the criteria are fairly broad. The authority level of the person who has to sign the letter (and the attendant accountability) has been going lower almost every year and it is reported NSLs have been abused numerous times.

In addition, one of the conditions of an NSL is that the people served with one are prohibited from even telling you your data were examined, copied, or seized.

If you're an active blogger, political activist, etc. or even if you just have concerns about privacy, it's another thing to keep in mind.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Security_Letter


In the U.K., I understand even the bin police can now enter your home without a warrant...so it might not matter where you store your data if for example you live in Nottinghamshire. ;)

Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 10, 2010, 01:45pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
If the backup is kept at a business (bank, at work, online backup company, etc) a search warrant may not even be needed. Unlike a search warrant, a National Security Letter doesn't need a judge's approval and the criteria are fairly broad. The authority level of the person who has to sign the letter (and the attendant accountability) has been going lower almost every year and it is reported NSLs have been abused numerous times.

Actually, I was more worried about a fire breaking out at my location or somebody breaking in and just taking everything. If I have a backup at a relatives house, then all my stuff will still be available - that's what I meant by this. I have nothing to hide, really and privacy isn't a concern, losing my stuff is what I'm worried about.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
john albrich Oct 10, 2010, 01:55pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Joshua Marius, LeThe said:
Actually, I was more worried about a fire breaking out at my location or somebody breaking in and just taking everything. If I have a backup at a relatives house, then all my stuff will still be available - that's what I meant by this. I have nothing to hide, really and privacy isn't a concern, losing my stuff is what I'm worried about.


Yeah...that's why mine's kept at a friend's house. Though it's still kept encrypted. (which I think you mentioned, too). Plus, it's just more convenient and it's free.

~Vel Oct 11, 2010, 02:32pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
What kind of UPS do you have?

john albrich Oct 11, 2010, 08:49pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
~Vel said:
What kind of UPS do you have?

On this system, I've got this Tripp Lite (was US$100 at a local "big box" store. It's listed on Newegg at ~$120
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E1684211103...ART1000LCD)
Detailed specs
http://www.tripplite.com/en/products/model.cfm?txtModelID=3071

Tripp Lite
SMART1000LCD
1000VA/500W*
AVR (Automatic Voltage Regulation) For AC input of 89-139 volts, the AC output is adjusted to a stable level, and outside those limits it xfers to battery)
Battery is hot-swappable by user
4ms(max) Transfer time (better than 1/2 the typical time of similar UPS, and 1/3 that of cheap units)
Output=Sine-wave, not a modified sine-wave

However, I also have a number of APC and other Tripp Lite UPS units, some on more complex higher-power systems and some are used only on peripherals.

I used to be "APC or nothing". Recently, I like Tripp Lite's price-points, their very fast transfer times, that Tripp Lite provides detailed specs "up-front" that APC recently seems reluctant to provide up-front, and I had 2 "lightly" loaded APC units catastrophically fail on me a couple years ago ( the loads were only about 80% of their rated load). They were out of warranty so I dissected...2 MOSFETs had "blown" in each unit. I suspect over-heating.


*You may notice that units that claim 1000VA can have differing "Watts" support. For example, APC's competing model rates their 1000VA spec at 600W, and both Tripp Lite's SU1000XLA and APC's SMART-UPS XL rate 1000VA units at 800W. Some of the differences have to do with usage conditions, and the ability of the units to dissipate heat while running off battery. In some cases it's simply the different way it's calculated due to the different output waveform (e.g. sine-wave vs. approximated sine-wave). Some manufacturers may even make assumptions about the expected load (e.g. a computer PSU with active power factor correction). See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Volt-ampere

john albrich Oct 15, 2010, 08:19am EDT Report Abuse
>> When using a UPS can cause major problems!

I am of course this time referring to United Parcel Service

This is related to discussions in other threads about disk drive reliability and problems with the way some etailers are packaging what they ship. Here's one such...
http://www.hardwareanalysis.com/content/topic/76903/?o=40#584807

Today UPS delivered an electronics order and in my opinion was completely reckless and irresponsible in how he handled the package.

The guy rang the bell at my patio gate, and it took me all of 30 seconds to get to the door. By the time I opened the door, the delivery guy was nowhere in sight. I got out to the apartment's parking lot just in time to see his truck leave the exit. I returned to take my package inside.

Just before I opened the door I had heard a very loud "THUMP" on my concrete patio, and immediately knew what it was...

He had DROPPED the package over the top of my 6 FOOT HIGH WALL onto the concrete patio..

The package was located about 4 feet from the wall, so either the package bounced several feet or he actually tossed it over the wall.

One end of the 5"x12"x15" box was also "smushed" in about an inch.

Since I moved here, this is now the THIRD TIME a UPS agent has done this when delivering electronic components.

Unfortunately, neither complaining to UPS about the problem nor telling the etailer about the problem seem to do any damn bit of good.

...and THAT'S another reason disk backups are a good idea. Who knows how much earlier a drive/motherboard/adapter card/PSU/fan/etc might fail after that kind of treatment (assuming it didn't arrive DOA).

Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 15, 2010, 08:37am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

This is no surprise. Too bad a lot of people end up blaming the company that manufactures the product or the seller. I've seen tons of reviews on Newegg where people say "I'm never buying a Seagate disc again!" or "Newegg's packing sucks!". I ordered a very large UPS once and by the time I got it, the manuals and the power cord were sticking out of the box because it had holes in every corner.

Also, I ordered a 22" LCD Monitor once and the UPS guy put it under the door mat. I was lucky it did not rain that day or nobody bothered to see what the huge and obvious box was doing under a doormat.

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS
john albrich Oct 24, 2010, 11:39am EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

Thought I'd update regarding my earlier post when I said I was going to try going to an automated daily full system disk backup instead of a daily incremental backup.

It's great. Has absolutely zero impact on my use of the computer. So, this change simplifies things quite a bit.



Even if I'm using the computer at the time the backup kicks-off (~4am) the only impact is that a small window temporarily opens that tells me the backup job started and gives me a countdown to cancel the job if I want to. Then after about 10 seconds it disappears (I've asked the authors to consider providing a quiescent option on scheduled backups so the user might have a choice to make even that pop-up go away sometime soon).

While MR (reflect.exe) runs at a default priority=10* (Above Normal), it still consumes only about 15% of a single core of the CPU. So the impact on me while using other programs (browser, word processor, etc) is almost non-existent during the ~10 minutes the backup takes. On a single core system or older system, it might have more impact.



Just for fun, one thing I've decided to try on top of this, is to force the run-time priority to "belownormal".

Macrium Reflect Free Edition default run-time priority is "10=Above Normal".

MOST programs/processes run at "8=Normal" priority. MRFE does not provide a way for the user to adjust the run-time priority on background scheduled jobs. You can adjust it when you run it manually.

I added reflect.exe to the programs that program "Process Tamer" tames to automatically force the reflect.exe priority to "6=Below Normal"**. So any run-time impact on me is now even lower.

During normal use there's no significant difference in the time it takes to make the backup. If at 4am I just happen to be using the system to do a lot of other tasks, or something very CPU/system disk intensive, it can add 50% more to the backup time because of the "belownormal" priority it is now forced to have.

"Process Lasso" is another process management program one might try for this and other programs. (see majorgeeks.com) Both the programs let you control the priority of various programs, and can help ensure you can maintain control over your computer even if a program goes "rogue" and tries to start hogging all the CPU cycles.


*
While MR does provide a way for the user to set the "default" priority to other values ("Low" to "High" I think), that setting apparently does NOT apply to scheduled jobs (that use an XML script). And I could find no parameter in any of the XML scripts that allows the user to set the priority manually by editing the XML file.

**
I tried using "start /belownormal " in a script to force reflect.exe to run at "belownormal" priority, but when reflect.exe starts up it forces the priority to 10. But after it's been started, then the priority can be set to whatever value you want (either manually via something like "Process Explorer" or automatically using "Process Tamer" or equivalent).


G. G. Oct 24, 2010, 03:19pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
one of the nice thing about having UPS is that one can be online "Frag'n" away in BFBC2 and a storm rolls by knocking out the power....... poooffff.... you still be frag'n ..... hehehehe

I have a APC XS-1200 and a few times my power to the house has gone dark.... but my computer, modem, and router are still up and running. It's really cool, especially when it is in the middle of the night... power goes out, pitch black with only the glow of your system in the whole neighborhood emanating through the window of your house... heheheh...


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

-
Larry Ingram Oct 24, 2010, 07:29pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!
Hi john,

Statement: Re: Encryption
"If you setup each partition/drive as an encrypted entity using something like TrueCrypt, it simplifies things, and I've found the performance is generally better than using a backup program's encryption, or encrypting at the file/folder level. If one uses TrueCrypt in particular, I think it is also likely to be more robust encryption."

1. What are these different encryptions, or a encryption for that matter?

2. I noticed that the SMART1000LCD UPS you use is 500 Watts; What is the output of your PSU? My PSU is 750W.
Link to my PSU specs; http://www.thermaltakeusa.com/Product.aspx?C=1264&ID=1854#Tab1



john albrich Oct 24, 2010, 09:28pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

The full range of encryption capabilities of TrueCrypt can be found at truecrypt.org
They've got quite a few different schemes to select from, different degrees of "robustness" helped along by the option to use extremely long encryption keys, the ability to have an encryption key be a specific file on a thumb drive or similar, and more.

The PSU on the affected system is capable of up to 700W output. But that's not how much the system consumes even when it's loaded "to the gills". When I last checked, mobo, memory, disk, etc. configuration consumes a measured ~400Watts when everything is powered-up and running (all disk and optical drives spinning and doing prolonged read operations, CPU/GPU heavily loaded, etc. I'm not overclocking. I add a 20% buffer to be safe and that takes it up to 480Watts...with still a bit more safety margin left over. I'm not a big gamer.

I power the display and a few peripherals from a separate, cheaper, "dumb" UPS.

Joshua Marius, LeThe Oct 24, 2010, 09:52pm EDT Report Abuse
>> Re: Backups and a UPS--Just Saved Me TWICE!

I've got quite a list here of many custom made computers, lcd monitors, and much more stuff and how much power they use: http://www.letheonline.net/consumption.htm

Joshua Marius
http://www.letheonline.net
-----------------------------
Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1
Intel Core i5-2500K
ASUS P8Z68-V LX
Intel SSDSC2CW180A3 180 GB
RAID 1: Seagate ST3750528AS 750 GB
CORSAIR Vengeance 8 GB DDR3 1600
eVGA GeForce 8800 GTS

Continue Reading on Page: 1, 2, Next >>

 

    
 
 

  Topic Tools 
 
RSS UpdatesRSS Updates
 

  Related Articles 
 
 

  Newsletter 
 
A weekly newsletter featuring an editorial and a roundup of the latest articles, news and other interesting topics.

Please enter your email address below and click Subscribe.